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     Belgium

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Belgium with a population of about 10.7 million, is about the size of the State of Maryland. It is
a multilingual country with Dutch as the primary language in the northern half, known as the Flemish RegionFrench is spoken in the southern half, called the Walloon Region, while a smaller, German speaking community is located along the eastern border.  A mix of these languages is spoken in the Capital Region of Brussels.

The term "Low Countries" is used collectively for Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, a reference to the low-lying nature of the land.

On May 10, 1940 the Nazis occupation of the entire country began.  Some months later, the Nazis launched their anti-Jewish campaign and fifty-three thousand Jews were deported out of 100,000 residing in the country.  Jews were able to hide in an area of Belgium that the Germans, during WW 1, also did not occupy.

The majority of the Jews living in Belgium at this time, were foreign nationals, including many stateless ones.  Many tried to flee the country; some returned and others fled to the US, Latin America, Portugal, Britain, etc. 

Today, Belgium has the fourth largest Jewish community in Europe - a country that is the size
of Maryland.


A SONG IS BORN....... MADEMOISELLE

 In the summer of 1942, as persecution of Belgium 's Jews began, an   underground Jewish group took form in cooperation with the Belgian underground and set out to rescue Jewish children by hiding them in various places around the country. The most active team consisted of twelve-women, mostly non-Jewish, who managed to hide some 3000 children. This admirable clandestine campaign was unique by the complexity of its structure and the degree of its success.

The only remaining survivor from the team is Andre Geulen, and on September 4, a great number of the children who had been hidden, celebrated her ninetieth birthday. The celebration included a screening of a DVD in which singer Keren Hadar performed a song in her honor. The song stirred a great deal of emotion.

This song, composed very shortly before the event, arose from an impulse on the part of one of the hidden children - Shaul Harel, who today is a professor of pediatric neurology. And this is how it happened.....

One warm summer day at the Isrotel Dead Sea Hotel, the Harel family was visiting for a performance of the opera Ada at Masada. Shaul Harel was lolling alone in the whirlpool bath. As the warm water and the complete solitude began to take effect, he wondered intensely what gift he could bring to Andre for her birthday. "After all, she already has everything. After the war,  she married a Jewish attorney, they were blessed with two daughters and with grandchildren and great grandchildren, and to this day she is surrounded by the love of the children she rescued."

Suddenly, as to Archimedes in his warm bath, the Muse descended to him. Although he did not emerge with  mathematical equation - since mathematics was never his subject - he just as suddenly decided to write her a poem. And this is not to be taken lightly, since for many years he had written nothing but medical documentation and articles.

The warmth of the water and the atmosphere brought lines tumbling into his mind, and as if possessed, he burst into the hotel room and told his wife, Dahlia, to sit down and transcribe because otherwise the lines would "get away" from him. His wife raised her eyebrows, thinking that the desert heat had overpowered him. But she consented and soon a poem was on paper telling Andre's story. Shaul's imagination took him further and he said that the poem should be set to music and his favorite singer, Keren Hadar, should Perform it.

Since the poem was written in free verse, Dahlia worked rhymes into it. The poem was read to Keren and she was moved to tears. She said that it was suitable for setting to music and that she would like to sing it. She recommended Rafi Kadishzon, a prolific and well-known composer. Rafi heard the poem, liked it, and immediately recommended Dan Almagor, a master of the Hebrew word, to adjust the text for the music. In the end, Dan Almagor contributed greatly to the rhythm, to the refrain, and to the perfect fit of the lyrics. 

All this occurred in the course of two weeks. A week later, the song was recorded, the DVD visuals were prepared, and copies were printed with graphics and with a French and English translation. Everyone who saw it was moved, and now, here it is for you......

 'Mademoiselle' sung by Keren Hadar, with English translation

 (If this does not work for you, copy and paste link)

 

 

Books

"Belgium Jewish Heritage"
Available from the Belgian Tourist Office, 780 Third Avenue, Suite 1501, New York, NY 10017.  This booklet has information about Jewish museums, kosher restaurants and Jewish organizations.


"Index of Jewish Family Names and Family Search Indicators to Provide Quicker and Easier Searches in Brussels' Archives"  
Authored by Claude Geudevertt, this index is a genealogical tool which provides useful information for those interested in finding their Jewish roots and their possible connections with Belgium.  An alphabetical list of family names, based on available archival sources in Brussels, along with the first location where an individual or family is known or proved to have lived prior to coming to Brussels.  This index is one of a series of helpful publications available from GenAmi at a nominal charge.
http://asso.genami.free.fr/v2/en/index.html


"Memorial to the Jews Deported from Belgium 1942-44"
(Memorial de la Deportation des Juifs de Belgique")
Authored by Beate Klarsfeld, was published after 1978 in English and should be available from F.F.D.J.F 32, rue la Boetie, 75008 Paris, France or from The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation 515 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10022

 

Cities and Towns in Belgium

 

Synagoog van de Portugese ritus Hoveniersstraat 3

Antwerp

Antwerp was one of the main transit ports in Europe.  The Flemish port city encompasses one of the last remaining shtetls in the world.  Diamonds and Orthodoxy are the two forces of this community.  There are six large Ashkenazi Shuls and one small Sephardi one located across from the diamond exchange.  On the front of the synagogue is a memorial plaque to the victims of a Palestinian terrorist bomb placed there in 1981.  The primary language is Yiddish, French or Hebrew. Useful addresses in  Antwerp can be found listed
http://www.amyisrael.co.il/europe/belgium/cities.htm

Antwerp Census of 1913
Names and addresses may be obtained by writing to Micheline Guttmann, GenAmi, Paris, France
michelinegutmann@free.fr   
http://asso.genami.free.fr

http://wikitravel.org/en/Antwerp

In French
http://www.chez.com/genami/english/e_infogen.htm

Antwerp Passenger Lists
Available via the internet.  Make your request by posting a message in the
soc.genealogy.benelux  newsgroup who are very helpful.

Emigrants leaving from Antwerp to the US and Canada, in the period from 1872 until 1935, were in general, transported by the Red Star Line.  Unfortunately, it is said that nothing has survived of the Red Star Line archives.  The only source of information for emigrants who were not residents of Belgium are the registers of hotels and boarding houses.  Emigrants did not usually stay in hotels, but in boarding houses. Some, but not all, registers of boarding houses are kept at the Stadsarchief in Antwerp and can be viewed there.  The periods available are:

1811-1821
1877-1885
1925-1979
Nothing available for 1890-1891

Jan Bousse of Oostende, Belgium boussejan@pandora.be may be contacted for additional information according to a posting to JewishGen

Jewish Quarter of Antwerp, Belgium (1)
http://www.rovenko.com/2011/12/04/jewish-quarter-of-antwerp-belgium/

Shtetl Within A Shtetl
There had been a Jewish presence as early as the 13th century, but it took 500 years before Jews could worship freely.  The Jews were accused of creating the Black Plaque of 1348 by poisoning the wells. Under Spanish rule, between 1506 and 1713, the city attracted Conversos from Portugal who created not only a diamond and pearl industry, but also the sugar trade and in 1536, established the first international stock exchange in Europe.

Around the middle of the 16th century, Spanish sovereigns expelled Conversos who had arrived before 1543; by 1591, just 47 families remained. The Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 brought Antwerp under Austrian rule and Jews - including a few Ashkenazim were allowed residency in the city if they paid a special tax.

Jews were allowed, for the first time to settle freely in Antwerp after the French occupied the Low Countries in 1794.  Ashkenazim became dominant. In 1815, Antwerp was incorporated into The Netherlands and Jews were granted equality.  A Jewish cemetery was established in 1828.  In 1830, Belgium gained independence and over the next 30 years, the Jewish community grew to almost 1,000.

In 1939, the Jewish community reached 50,000 from the count of 8,000 in 1880 which made the Jews to be about 20 percent of the city's population. At the beginning of WWII, (April, 1941), pro-Nazis occupied Belgium and attacked Jewish shops and synagogues and in August they took over the diamond exchange.  With the help of the Jewish Resistance, some 800 Jews were hidden in the city, but, more than half of the Jewish community was murdered by the Nazis.

The city is referred to as the only European city with a shtetl.  The Jewish community is concentrated in Jootsewijk (the neighborhood around Pelikanstraat) and is highly visible of men in black coats and beards and modestly dressed women pushing baby carriages.  There are over a dozen synagogues - all of them Orthodox and now has a population of 18,000 Jews. 

For information about synagogues and kosher food, contact
Jacques Wenger, Director of Shomre Hadas
35 Terliststraat 
Phone 3-232-0187

http://www.shomre-hadas.be

Antwerp has an independent Jewish newspaper - Belgisch Israeliisch Weekblad
http://www.gva.be/regio-antwerpen-stad/antwerpen/belgisch-israelitisch-weekblad-stopt.aspx

Much of the information on Antwerp was gleaned from an April 2007 issue of Hadassah Magazine that was written by Esther Hecht.  There is a lot more interesting facts in the article.
http://www.hadassahmagazine.org/site/c.twI6LmN7IzF/b.5766935
/k.1F72/April_2007_Vol_88_No_8.htm


Arlon

A monument has been placed in the new Jewish cemetery to the memory of the Jews of Arlon who were deported and massacred by the Nazis. 
Synagogue
There is a synagogue at Rue St. Jean. 
Contact: Sec: J. C. Jacob rue des Martyrs 11
Phone: 063 21 79 85
http://www.edwardvictor.com/BelgiumFrame2Main.htm

http://www.alljewishlinks.com/arlon-synagogue-in-arlon-belgium/

http://www.edwardvictor.com/BelgiumFrame2Main.htm

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/belgium/arlon.html   

http://www.culture-routes.lu/php/fo_index.php?lng=en&back=%252Fphp%252Ffo_index.php%253Fdest%253Dbq_00_000%2526lng%253Den&dest=bd_me_det&id=00002093&PHPSESSID=715f12a86592b7636
ebbabe928956713

http://www.culture-routes.lu/php/fo_index.php?lng=en&view=full&dest=bd_ev_det&id=00001594 

http://www.jewisheritage.org/jh/agenda_detail.php?lang=1&e=2009&id=2


Bruge (Brocha)

  

Should you ever plan on visiting Belgium, may I suggest you consider this wonderful and delightful town.  In all of our travels, Shirley and I have never found a more tranquil setting as this town displays.  You will be able to see how people lived from the 14th and 15th centuries on as this town has preserved this delightful atmosphere very carefully. Bruge is a canal-filled former capital of West Flanders.

There are no modern buildings around.  Nothing has been remodeled to look like the 21st century.  The town looks the same today as it did in yesteryear. And if you are lucky, once every four years, I believe, the town has a celebration and the townspeople dress up like in the old days.  We happened to visit there when it happened and remember it now often as one of life's wonderful travel experiences.
http://www.sacred-destinations.com/belgium/brussels-jewish-museum-of-belgium.htm

http://www.brugge.be/internet/en/index.htm

http://www.frommers.com/destinations/bruges/0105020867.html


Brussels

Once a sleepy village that grew up around a chapel on an island in the Senne River, Brussels is now a thriving small capital city.  There is a substantial and diverse Jewish community  and the city is also the seat of the Consistoire Central Israelite de Belgique, the official representative body of Belgian Jewry that is composed of representatives of both Orthodoxy and the secular Jewish organizations.
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=1541&letter=B

Holocaust
List of 100,000 names from Brussels

Containing all the names of Jews and others, deported from Belgium, including some with their families.  Many families lived in Brussels since the 18th century.  Names from Eastern Europe, as well as from France, Germany and the Netherlands
  
http://asso.genami.free.fr
 

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lodz/trace.htm

Also there is a database containing documents, names and pictures from Jews deported from Belgium on the site:
http://dannes-camiers.newedgeconcept.com/

Jewish Museum
(site is in French and Dutch only)

www.mjb-jmb.org

Synagogues
Beth Hillel
The synagogue of the Communaute Israelite Liberale de Belgique rue Josepah Dupont. It is the largest synagogues in Belgium and is traditional Ashkenazim. Rabbi is Albert Guigui.  Email: 512 43.34 & 512 92 37 has about 400 families as members.
http://www.alljewishlinks.com/liberal-synagogue-beth-hillel-in-brussels-belgium/

http://www.kosherdelight.com/BelgiumSynagogues.shtml

The Central Synagogue
Established in 1878 and is next door to the Royal Conservatory and near the Palais de Justice.  Behind its nondescript front, is a stunningly beautiful interior. The congregation is 'traditional' and shares the synagogue with Orthodox  members  who hold their own parallel services in a shtibl on the second floor.  There are about 1,300 families who attend the High Holiday services.
http://www.mavensearch.com/synagogues/C3359Y41444RX

Machsike Hadass
Communaute Israelite Orthodoxe de Bruxelles
67a rue de la Clinique
Rabbi Chaikin. 

Synagogue
Beth Ha'Midrash, a mikva'ot'oth and the Beth Din on the premises.
http://www.sefarad.org/communaute/communautes_anv.php?safa=
 

http://www.ikg-wien.at/static/etis/unter/html/re/synas/machsike.htm  

Much more general information about the Jewish community, including the addresses and phone numbers of the many synagogues and Jewish organizations in Brussels can be found at  
http://www.amyisrael.co.il/europe/belgium/cities.htm


Charleoi

Synagogue and a Kehila at
56 rue Pige au Croly
Contact: Sec: M. Weinberg 65 rue van der Velde, 6300 Marchiennes
http://www.mavensearch.com/synagogues/C3359Y41460RX

http://www.cicb.be/en/help.htm

http://www1.yadvashem.org/yv/en/righteous/pdf/resources/lucien_steinberg.pdf 


Fort Breedonk

This is an abandoned army fortress that was used as a concentration camp by the Nazis during the war.  It primarily housed political prisoners, including Jews who were active in the resistance and was a notorious torture chamber site.  

The site has been preserved intact and is today a national memorial.  It is one of the 22 camps that won the morbid honor of having its name engraved on the floor of the memorial crypt at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.
http://www.channels.nl/knowledge/15020.html

http://www.breendonk.be/EN/index.html

Between 1942 and 1944, the Nazis rounded up more than 25,000 Belgian Jews, including 5,430 children, into the General Dossin de Saint Georges Barracks at Mechelen, halfway between Brussels and Antwerp.  They were then deported to Auschwitz where only 1,207 survived.

Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance
153 Goswin de Stassartstraat
http://www.muselia.com/mechelen/jewish-museum-of-deportation-and-resistance/2542

Breendonck
http://www.skalman.nu/third-reich/holocaust-camps.htm

  • A convoy of Jews(#20), left from Malines, Belgium on April 10, 1943 to Auschwitz

  • On August 13-14, stateless Jews are seized in the Belgian port city of Antwerp and sent to the Malines transit camp.


Ghent

Synagogue
Located at St. Elizabethplein 11. 
Contact is J. Bloch, Veldstraat 60 
Telephone: 09 225 70 85
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0007_0_07267.html

http://www.mavensearch.com/synagogues/C3359Y41461RX

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=209&letter=G

http://books.google.com/books?id=5azmtjTEQW4C&pg=PA307&lpg=PA307&dq
=Ghent+Jew&source=bl&ots=WyoWqgQnht&sig=xJCxutvLsF7UDmi2gXyAKsu31
DQ&hl=en&ei=YpU4TL2bBIvCsAOomoxS&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum
=8&ved=0CDsQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q&f=false


Keerbergen

I received the following Email: - perhaps someone will be able to help Frans.
 
"
I am writing a book about Keerbergen airfield.  In 1943, Berthold Linz and Fréderic Steiner, Jewish people who lived in Keerbergen, were arrested by the Germans.  I suppose that both men died in concentration camps.  Is there any website or database where I can find the names of the Belgian-Jewish people who died in these German camps ?  Where can I find confirmation about the fate of these people from Keerbergen? Nothing was found in the local archives of Keerbergen. Many thanks for your help, Frans Van Humbeek Frans.Van.Humbeek@pandora.be
http://www.dopplr.com/place/be/keerbergen

http://www.glasglow.com/e2/ke/Keerbergen.html

http://www.novelguide.com/a/discover/ciow_03/ciow_03_00117.html


Knokke

There is a kosher restaurant Steinmetz, Piers de Raveschootlaan 129

Synagogue
Synagogue and mikva'ot'oth
Located at Van
Bunnenlaan 30
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Belgium.html

http://www.mavensearch.com/synagogues/C3359Y41462RX

http://www.alljewishlinks.com/synagogues/europe/belgium/knokke/


Koksijde aan zee

This is a kosher vacation camp for children, Damesweg 10 and is run by the 'Centrale'
http://www.koksijde.be/default.html


Le Chateau de Dongelberg

The following 4 people who were hidden in an orphanage called Le Chateau de Dongelberg in Belgium. I have some photos of the children that lived there that I'm sure they would like to have.

SZENKLEWSKI, Nelly born Aug. 14, 1943 in Brussels
PIENICA, Elisabeth born March 13, 1937 in Antwerp
ROSENCWEIG, Rachel born September 24, 1942 in Borgerhaut
KRYGIER, Michele born September 6, 1942 in Brussels

If you know any of these individuals or their families, please contact me privately. Felicia P. Zieff tzippy_chs@sbcglobal.net   Association of Descendants of the Shoah - Illinois, Inc.
http://adsillinois.org

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zloczew/zloczew.html


Liege

Synagogue and Kehila
Located at rue Leon Fredericq 19. 
The Community Centre and Entraide Juive (Jewish mutual help) Located at
12 Quai Marcellis (also a shelter)

Musee Serge Kruglanski
19 rue Leon Fredericq
http://www.mavensearch.com/synagogues/C3359Y41463RX


http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/idcard.php?ModuleId=10006513

http://www.alljewishlinks.com/liege-synagogue-in-liege-belgium/


Mechelen

The Dossinkazerne is an army garrison that was used by the Nazis as a transit camp for Jews to be sent to one of the death camps and is currently being converted into a Deportation Museum.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechelen_transit_camp

http://www.massviolence.org/The-Transit-Camp-for-Jews-in-Mechelen-The-Antechamber-of

Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance in Belgium
Located in Mechelen, Daniel Dratwa
Director
d.dratwa@mjb-jmb.org
or Bob Drilsma
b.drilsma@innet.be or
Marcel Apsel
marap@innet.be  
Ms. Laurence Schram is the archivist and historian.

The museum has available many files including various Registers of Jews, a Library of various genealogical periodicals, many records and a photo archive of about 12,000 photos.

"Joods Museum van Deportatie en Verzet"
Located in Mechelen and holds list of deported Jews.  They are very helpful with providing information.. 
Email:
infos@cicb.be 
http://www.cicb.be/eng/start_eng.htm

http://www.cicb.be 

Joods Museum Van Deportatie en Verzet
Goswin de Stassartstraat 153
B-2800
Mechelen, Belgium
Phone: (015) 29 06 60
Fax: (015) 29 08 76
Email:pmj@link.be


Mons  

There is a small Jewish Community that hold regular services. It is near to the Casteau the International Chapel of NATO AEs Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe.  Information: Shape, 7010, Belgium.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0003_0_02348.html

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1965562

http://www.jewishtravelagency.com/JewishTravel/BelgiumJewishHeritage.htm


Ostend

Synagogue
Services are held in July and August at the synagogue located at
Maastrichtplein 3
21, B-8400
Contact: Secretary Liliane Wulfowicz Parklaan
http://www.sacred-destinations.com/belgium/ostend-synagogue.htm

http://www.visitbelgium.com/index.php/jewish-heritage

http://www.alljewishlinks.com/synagogues/europe/belgium/


Roubaix

Roubaix is known as “l’Enfer du Nord” which translates to “The Hell of the North.” That expression came from the soldiers who were posted there during WW I. The rough farm tracks and cobbled lanes that are used are what was left after the bombing in World War 1.

http://www.thejc.com/travel/holidays/28996/curtain-a-lille-what-you-fancy 

http://books.google.com/books?id=OS2iGsTaeO0C&pg=PA94&lpg=PA94&dq=Roubaix++Belgium+jew&source=bl&ots=
Yh4JGhcZPy&sig=jn79Q35V4O9R8DP_dfIza7SQFmw&hl=en&ei=tJ84TPTHIIycsQPg_
N1R&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&ved=0CDAQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q
=Roubaix%20%20Belgium%20jew&f=false

http://www.genami.org/en/belgian-file/belgian-file-h.php


Spa

The English word "spa" comes from the Belgian town of the same name.  Spa is renowned for its healing hot springs.
http://www.jewishexponent.com/article/11072

http://www.historyorb.com/countries/belgium

http://www.rijo.homepage.t-online.de/pdf/EN_NU_JU_lorch.pdf


Zaventem (Brussels National Airport)

There is a synagogue in the transit hall.
http://www.htbrussels.com/archives/sermons_
2009/A%20House%20of%20Prayer%20for%20all%20Nations%2013%20September%202009%20Robert%20Innes.pdf

http://www.etriptips.com/wiki/Antwerp

 

General  Belgium
Information

   


 

Mademoiselle 

  A SONG IS BORN

In the summer of 1942, as persecution of  Belgium 's Jews began, an underground Jewish group took form in cooperation with the Belgian underground and set out to rescue Jewish children by hiding them around the country. The most active team consisted of 12 women, mostly non-Jewish, who hid some 3000 children. This admirable clandestine campaign was unique by the complexity of its structure and the degree of its success.

The only remaining survivor from the team is Andrée Geulen, and recently, a great number of the children who were hidden, celebrated her 90th birthday. The celebration included a screening of a DVD in which singer Keren Hadar performed a song in her honor. The song stirred a great deal of emotion.  

Composed shortly before the event, this song, arose from an impulse on the part of one of the hidden children — Shaul Harel, who today is a professor of pediatric neurology.

And this is how it happened...

One warm summer day at the Isrotel Dead Sea Hotel, the Harel family was visiting for a performance of the opera Aïda at Masada.  Shaul Harel was lolling alone in the whirlpool bath. As the warm water and the complete solitude began to take effect, he wondered intensely what gift he could bring to Andrée for her birthday. "After the war, she married a Jewish attorney, they were blessed with two daughters, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and to this day she is surrounded by the love of the children she rescued."

Suddenly, he decided to write her a poem.  

The warmth of the water and the atmosphere brought lines tumbling into his mind.  He burst into the hotel room and asked his wife, Dahlia, to transcribe before the lines could "get away" from him.  His wife raised her eyebrows, thinking that the desert heat had overpowered him.  But she consented and soon a poem was written telling Andrée's story. Shaul's imagination took him further and he said that the poem should be set to music and his favorite singer, Keren Hadar, should perform it.    

Since the poem was written in free verse, Dahlia worked rhymes into it. The poem was read to Keren, who was moved to tears. She said that it was suitable for setting to music and that she would sing it. She recommended Rafi Kadishzon, a well-known composer. Rafi heard the poem, liked it, and recommended Dan Almagor, a master of the Hebrew word, to adjust the text for the music. In the end, Dan Almagor contributed greatly to the rhythm, refrain, and to the perfect fit of the lyrics. 

This occurred in the  course of two weeks. A week later, the song was recorded, the DVD visuals were prepared, and copies were printed with graphics and with a French and English translation. Everyone who saw it was moved, and now, here it is for you... thanks to my North High School buddy, Al Isenberg.  Sorry about the commercial.

'Mademoiselle'  sung by Keren Hadar, with English translation
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QR6PC74--1s&feature=youtu.be&noredirect=1

 


Archives - General State Archives - in Brussels

Lewis Baratz, in a posting to JewishGen of Feb 10, 1999, stated that "as a Fulbright Scholar, Belgium has remarkable archives, probably second only to the UK, and the documents are highly accessible." 

Liege Archive
In the Francophone community which is a bit less likely to prioritize a foreign request - language reasons, primarily.

http://arch.arch.be/AGR_N.HTML
 

Stadsarchief Antwerpen
(City Archive of Antwerp, Belgium)
http://www.evamp.org/partnersSA.asp?page=partners.asp

http://vlib.iue.it/hist-eur-integration/Archives.html

http://users.skynet.be/pjansse1/genealogy/BEL-archives/arch.html 

http://www.oesta.gv.at/site/6408/default.aspx

DIGITAL RONBEWERKINGE D B N N NETHERLANDS AND BELGIË
http://www.geneaknowhow.net/digi/bronnen.html


Belgium Jewish History

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Belgium.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Belgium  

http://www.visitbelgium.com/index.php/jewish-heritage

http://www.rootsweb.com/~jfuller/gen_mail_country-blg.html


Belgium and Dutch Jews

They were sometimes called Black Dutch in America because they spoke Dutch or Flemish and were darker than the other Dutch and Flemish. They had only recently moved to the Netherlands and Belgium (then Spanish Netherlands) from Iberia (Portugal and Spain). When Spain annexed Portugal for a while, many Portuguese Jews fled to Spanish Flanders to escape the Inquisition or Flanders as part of Spanish Netherlands).
http://www.theotherside.co.uk/tm-heritage/background/flanders.htm   

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118746675/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0  

http://fcit.usf.edu/holocaust/people/rescuer.htm

http://www.geschichteinchronologie.ch/eu/belgien/EncJud_juden-in-Belgien01-MA-ENGL.html

http://www.tngenweb.org/campbell/hist-bogan/BlackDutch.html

http://www.comanchelodge.com/black-dutch.html

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hornbeck/blkdutch.htm

Most, like the famous philosopher Baruch Spinoza, crossed into Protestant Netherlands for greater freedom of expression and religion. For more on Spinoza. These Sephardic Jews were, on the average, darker than the Ashkenazic Jews of northern Europe, so an explanation like Black Dutch suited them well.
http://www.astrotheme.com/portraits/s566Kh62w8L3.htm


Belgium and its Jews During the War

http://www.ihr.org/jhr/v18/v18n2p-2_Weber.html

http://www.southerninstitute.info/holocaust_education/study_guide_jeannine_burk
.pdf
 


Belgium-Roots Project

Created for the purpose of assisting the descendants of Belgian emigrants/immigrants living abroad in tracing their Belgian roots and exploring their Belgian heritage
http://belgium.rootsweb.ancestry.com/

http://www.immigrantships.net/newcompass/pass_lists/listbelgium.html 

http://www3.telus.net/public/mtoll/belgium.htm


Belgian Society for Jewish Genealogy

Genealogy and Family History
In the Benelux Jewish Museum of Belgium
On-line Archives in Flanders, Belgium
City Archives of Antwerp in Belgium
City Records of Mechelen in Belgium
Shoah Museum in Belgium - GeneaNet
 
http://www.nljewgen.org/

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4GGLL_enUS361&q=Belgian+Society+for+Jewish+Genealogy+

http://www.pitt.edu/~meisel/jewish/jgs.htm

http://www.jgsws.org/jewresearch.htm#begin

Daniel Dratwa is the President and is also the Conservator of the Jewish Museum of Belgium.


Belgian Tourist Office

Jewish cultural organizations, synagogues, Shoah memorials, 24-hour radio station information
http://www.towd.com/search.php?country=Belgium

http://www.visitbelgium.com/


Central Jewish Welfare Organization

B-Antwerp 2018, Belgium
http://www.jewnet.ru/eng/sitescat/?region_id=0&profile_id=0&action=search


Digital Resources for Belgium

Contains a huge amount of resources including passenger lists  
http://geneaknowhow.net/digi/resources.html

http://genealogy.about.com/od/belgium/Belgium_Genealogy_Family_History.htm 

http://www.genealogylinks.net/europe/belgium/


The Emigrants from Belgium to the United States and Canada

www.ping.be/picavet/

http://www.theshipslist.com/Forms/Canreport1901.htm

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gsfa/links.html


European Council of Jewish Communities

http://www.jewisheritage.org/

http://www.ecjc.org/modules/home/index.php

http://www.jesna.org/sosland/resources/National-and-International-Associations/European-Council-of-Jewish-Communities-(ECJC)/details


European Visual Archive (EVA)

The European Visual Archive  is a searchable image resource containing historical photographs dating from 1840 up to today. The photographs originate from the collections of the London Metropolitan Archives and the Stadsarchief Antwerpen. Currently EVA contains 18.028 descriptions of digitized photographs.  The site is available in English, French, Dutch, German, Italian, and Spanish.
http://192.87.107.12/eva/uk/search_adv.asp


FrenchSIG

This is a discussion group and there is a lot of information about Jewish genealogical research in France, French Colonies and French-speaking areas including Belgium, Luxembourg and Switzerland.   
http://www.jewishgen.org/french

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jfuller/gen_mail_jewish.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/rabbinic/infofiles/genami.htm

http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com/2010/06/france-genami-issue-52-now-available.html


GenAmi

Has a list of names from the Brussels Archives.  These lists are indexes for the dictionary of genealogy and biography and are important because immigrants to Brussels came from all over Europe including: France (Paris, Alsace, Lorraine), Netherlands, England, Germany, Eastern Europe, Turkey, North Africa and even America.
http://asso.genami.free.fr/v2/index.html

http://www.genami.org/Personnages-celebres/en_membres-gd-sanhedrin.php


Index of Jewish Family Names and Family Search Indicators

Compiled by Claude C. Geudevert, is partially available at the GenAmi website  
http://asso.genami.free.fr/v2/index.html

This is an index providing an alphabetical list of family names, along with the first location where an individual or family is known to have arrived from, or has proved to have lived prior to coming to Brussels.
http://www.avotaynu.com/wwwsites.html

http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/Ties-That-Bind

http://databases.lapl.org/


Jewish Cemeteries

Based on various sources, there are no Jewish cemeteries in Belgium.  This information was also based on a Belgian Law that requires a cemetery to be dug up, or destroyed, after a period of 49 years.  Most Belgian Jews were buried in Holland.
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/belgium/putte.html

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/belgium/index.html

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Jewish_cemeteries_in_Belgium

US Military Cemetery
Henri La Chapelle US Military Cemetery
http://www.criba.be/index.php?option=com_contentview=article&id=19:henri-chapelle-american-military-cemetery&catid=14&Itemid=28

http://www.peachmountain.com/5star/American_Cemetery_Henri_Chapelle_Belgium
.asp

http://www.awon.org/memorials/henrichapelle/


Jewish Genealogical Society of Belgium

Daniel Dratwa, President
74 Avenue Stalingrad
B-1000 Bruxelles, Belgique 
Phone: 32 2 512 19 63  Fax: 32 2 513 48 59
Email:
d.dratwa@mjb-jmb.org  
http://www.mjb-jmb.org

http://www.jgsny.org/dorot.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/

http://www.genealogylinks.net/country/jewish-genealogy/europe/index.html


Jewish Museum of Belgium (Joods Museum van Belgie)

Genealogy and exhibition links and choose language of choice. The JMB has a card-index system of 65,000 Jews who lived in Belgium in November, 1940. The Museum has many other lists according to the web site.
Daniel Dratwa Email:
d.dratwa@mjb-jmb.org
http://www.mjb-jmb.org/  

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/belgium/brussels-jewish-museum-of-
belgium.htm

http://www.cicb.be/en/home_en.htm

http://www.opt.be/informations/tourist_attractions_bruxelles__jewish_museum
_of_belgium/en/V/16901.html

http://www.travelchannel.com/Places_Trips/Destinations/Europe/Belgium
/Brussels/Attractions/Jewish_Museum_Of_Belgium_Musee_Juif_De_Belgique
 


Jewish Secular Community Center

B-1060 Brussels
Belgium
http://www.culturaljudaism.org/ccj/communities/communities

http://www.holocausttaskforce.org/memberstates/member-belgium.html


Jewish Social Services

B-1060 Brussels
Belgium
http://www.ijc.be/
 

http://forms.claimscon.org/allocations_lists/all_allocations.php?order=city&type=asc 

http://www.ijc.be/newcomers.html


List of family names up to 1900

http://www.nljewgen.org/international.html 

http://www.cyndislist.com/jewish.htm


  Belgium Maps 

       

Open Street Maps
The crowd-sourced mapping project OpenStreetMap has amassed a million contributors since its inception in 2005 and, according to navigation app maker Skobbler, boasts greater accuracy in England, Russia and Germany than rivals such as Google Maps.  I tried the site and found an accurate drawing of my father's ancestral town Tal'ne, Ukraine.  Almost every country is available as is most towns
http://openstreetmap.org

http://www.wordtravels.com/Travelguide/Countries/Belgium/Map

http://www.europeetravel.com/maps/

http://www.trabel.com/belgie-imap.htm

http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/europe/be.htm



Search Sites

www.pageszoom.com 

www.teldir.com  

www.world-address.com/francetres


Society for Jewish Genealogy in Belgium

http://www.nljewgen.org/belg_gen.html

http://www.cyndislist.com/jewish.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/french/links.htm


Yiddish Newspapers

"Yiddishe Tseitoung" was published in Antwerp and Brussels.  Copies of the paper may be found at the Hebrew University in Cincinnati.
http://www.artsci.uc.edu/judaic/


http://huc.edu/

http://www.world-newspapers.com/jewish-magazines.html

http://assembly.coe.int/Documents/WorkingDocs/doc96/edoc7489.htm

more to come ...


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