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  Bukovina (Bukowina)

c



The Jewish relics of Czernowitz under Romanian occupation were much less devastated during the Second World War than those in neighboring Galicia. The majority of its Jewish population, for whom the city’s mayor, Traian Popovici managed to secure exemption from the Transnistrian deportation, also survived the war. The vast cemetery stretching along behind the mortuary, where there were burials even as late as the 70s, has preserved a multitude of beautiful gravestones. And the former diversity of Czernowitz is well attested by the fact that, just like those in the Christian cemetery, they also show German, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Hebrew, Yiddish and other names and inscriptions alike
http://riowang.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-cemetery-of-czernowitz.html

Mode of t

Use this search box to search all Jewish Web Index pages

Some graphics are from other sites without
permission but with a link to the site

Please note that not all links will work mostly because the
                        link has been changed or deleted by their respective owner.
ation in 1994

 
 
 

Bucovina (Bukovina, Bukowina) in English this translates to Beech Wood - is located in northeastern Romania and is a region that is also located in southwestern Ukraine. 

Bucovina (Bukowina) is an area located in the eastern Carpathian mountains.  Until 1769, the area was ruled by the Ottoman Turks when it was then taken over by Russia. In 1775, it formed a part of Galicia until 1849 when it became a separate province of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until the end of WWI.  It was a province of Romania from 1917 to 1944. 

Bukovina was once located in Galicia.  It was separated from Galicia by the Cheremosh river.  According to a knowledgeable source, there are no Bukovina records in the Romania Archives, but rather there are some in the Ukraine Archives.  This statement was challenged by Bruce Reisch in an Email: to me of 10/23/01 in which he states "In my experience, the records to be found in Romania are much more complete than those in the Chernivetskaya oblast.'  'All of the Suceava Judetel Jewish records prior to approx. 1890 are to be found in the regional archive in Suceava.'  'The post ca. 1890 records are in the local town halls.'  'The records for Radauti at both locations are amazingly complete.'  'Birth and death records are available post - 1857 but marriage records are much more spotty.'

Before WWI, the area was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and became known as Bukovina when it was taken from the Turks in 1775..  The capital city is Chernovitz (Chiernovce, Czernowitz, Cernauti). The German (Austrian) name is Czernowitz.   

Both Galicia (which was part of Poland before Poland was partitioned in the late 18th century) and Bukovina were in the Austro-Hungarian empire and from 1786 to 1849, Bukovina was administered as part of the province of Galicia.

After WW II, the northern portion became a part of the USSR while the southern area was part of Romania. Today, the northeast is in Romania and the southwest is in the Ukraine.  ShtetLinks offers photos and more searchable information
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/suceava.htm
 

Duchy of Bukovina belongs to the countries austryackich since 1774, covers 1,011.134 hectares of land, with a population of 305,101 Russians, 273,254 Romanians, 102,919 Jews, 66,210 Poles, 62,700 Germans, Hungarians 10391, 3232 Lipowanów
http://www.karpaty.travel.pl/?fn_mode=fullnews&fn_id=57

Look in all three countries: Ukraine, Romania and Moldavia. For further information about Bukovina, subscribe to the Bukovina Mailing List by sending an Email: to listproc@gpfn.sk.ca with the following message subscribe bukovina-gen (your first name) (your last name)

Bukovina (Region), Romania/Ukraine

Bucovina (region), Romania/Ukraine
Handbook prepared under the direction of the Historical Section of the British Foreign Office, 1919; Geschichte Der Juden in Der Bukowina (History of the Jews in the Bukovina)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html
 

Bukovina (Bucovina) (Region), Romania/Ukraine
Handbook prepared under the direction of the Historical Section of the British Foreign Office - 1919 - Geschichte Der Juden in Der Bukowina (History of the Jews in the  Bukovina) 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/suceava.htm  

Bukovina Society
http://www.bukovinasociety.org/Religion/Massier-German-Baptist-Movement-Bukovina-Galicia-1997.html

Bukovina Society of America
Maps and a lot of good information
www.bukovinasociety.org/

Bukovina Society of the Americas
http://www.bukovinasociety.org/map-room.html

General Websites about Galicia and Bukovina

Galicia in the Jewish Encyclopedia

Galicia in the "Yivo" Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe

Bukovina - General information (most in German)


A photograph website of Galician Jewry


Organizations

The Galicia Jewish Museum in Krakow

The "Yivo" Institute for Jewish Research

The Zolkiew and Mosty Wielki organization

The Jews of Bukovina Organization

 

Archives and Historical Societies:

The Central Archive for History of the Jewish People

The Historical Jewish Press website

The Virtual Shtetl website

The American Jewish Historical Society

The Israeli Historical Society

The Jewish Virtual Library

The Bukovina Society of the Americas

The Center for Urban History of East Central Europe


Genealogy

The Jewish Gen Website

The Gesher Galicia Website

The Israel Genealogical Society

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies

A dictionary of Jewish Surnames from Galicia

The Central database of Shoah Victims' names

http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134891/articles/useful-links

Region in Romania
http://motlc.wiesenthal.com/text/x04/xr0472.html

(See also my Romania Web Page for additional information)


Books 
             

"Jewish Cemeteries in Bucovina"
A diplomat has published a book on Jewish cemeteries in Bucovina, Romania and Ukraine, a region shared by the two countries since World War II.

Authored by Swiss Embassy counselor in Bucharest, Simon Geissbuhler It is a travelers' guide to 15 Jewish cemeteries - nine in Romania and six in Ukraine.


"Bukowina: History of the Jews in the Bukowina"
Volume 2: Czernowitz, Ukrainian (Chernivtsi)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


"Der Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina"
Authored by Hugo Gold.  There are two volumes: Band I and Band II, published in 1958 in German.  There does not appear to be an English version.  This book mentions these towns: Sadagora, Suczawa, Radautz, Wiznitz, Sereth, Kimpolung, Aschkoutz, Storozynetz, Gurahumora, Bojan, Dorna-Vatra, Unter-Stanestie, Uscie-Putila, Banila, Ob. Stanestie, Zastawna, Ispas, and Rohozna.


General  
Bukovina Genealogical
Information


    Jews being deported from Bessarabia and Bukovina to Transnistria 

http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/nazioccupation/romaniagal/Jews%20are%20deported%20from%20Bessarabia%20and%20Bukovina%20to%20Transnistria.html


All Galicia Database

This search engine currently features 226,572 records from 76 different data sources, covering everything from birth, death, marriage and divorce records to phonebooks, school and landowner records, all from the former Austro-Hungarian province of Galicia, which today is part of eastern Poland and western Ukraine. Although Gesher Galicia's focus is researching Jewish roots in this region, the diverse community sources of information in this database also contain names that span all the ethnic and religious groups who lived in the area, so not everyone listed in this database will necessarily be Jewish
http://search.geshergalicia.org/


Bucovina (Region), Romania/Ukraine

Handbook prepared under the direction of the Historical Section of the British Foreign Office - 1919; "Geschichte Der Juden in Der Bukowina" (History of the Jews in the Bucovina)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Bukovina-Gen list

To subscribe, send a message to listproc@lists.gpfn.sk.ca with NO subject header and NO signature file, saying only: subscribe bukovina-gen yourfirstname yourlast name where, of course, your first name and your last name is your real first and last name.

Links
Information on Bukovina and its capital, Chernovitz as well as Radauti/Radautz, Gura Humorului and the Romanian Jewish Genealogy SIG
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/sadgura/sadgura.html
 


Community Names and Administrative Districts

Jews started settling in Galicia and Bukovina in the 12th century, and the Jewish population of these regions reached close to one million on the eve of the Holocaust. Most of the Jews of these regions lived in small towns (Shtethlekh in Yiddish), and in some of these they constituted a majority of the population. At the beginning of the 20th century a significant proportion of the regions’ Jews lived in the countryside – according to some estimates, up to 36.6 %.

http://jgaliciabukovina.net/131/article/communities


Database

Of more than 250 graduates from the years 1885 - 1896 of the Ober-Gymnasium (secondary school) in Radautz, Bukowina (now Radauti, Romania) - In addition to the year of birth, the profession and town of residence in 1897 is given for each graduate.  Webmaster is Peter Elbau
http://mypage.bluewin.ch/bukowina/StudRad.html
 


Galicia and Bukovina War Refugees Directory

Based on an *initial* official registration with the authorities on arrival [first address and number of people in family group]. QED - there were 3 people in the MOSCISKER family group, so we have effectively confirmed the *3 os.* problem and any further *os* problems, if they arise again. Thus, the little word *os* can give us quite a lot of genealogical information! This information was obtained from a posting by Celia Male
http://www.dbhd.org/search.php 


Jewish Bucovina

A rich source of information, namely bibliographies and synopses.
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/search/tombstones

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/sadgura/ReischToronto.html

http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com/2009/06/book-bucovina-jewish-cemeteries.html 

http://ftp.nizkor.org/hweb/people/c/carmelly-felicia/deportations.html

http://www.infohub.com/vacation_packages/5500.html

http://www.shanibaron.com/Project_.html


 Maps

Maps of Russia and the FSU (Former Soviet Union)  Republics - be prepared to stay online for quite some time, if you want to see one of the largest collections of different types of maps.  This site is fabulous and offers a huge variety of maps that include such titles as Bucovina Maps; Ukraine Maps and Distances; Ex-USSR map; Maps of Europe in different eras; Russian Far East Maps; Belarus Maps; Ukraine Maps; Kazakhstan Maps:  Georgia Maps; Tajikistan Maps; Crimea Maps; Uzbekistan Maps; Azerbaijan Maps; Kyrgyzstan Maps; Moldova Maps; Turkmenistan Maps; Armenia Maps; Caucuses Region Maps; Baltic States Maps including Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia; and more at
http://users.aimnet.com/~ksyrah/ekskurs/maps.html

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~romwgw/districthotmap.html

http://user.aol.com/LJensen/bukomaps.html 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bukovina

http://historicaltextarchive.com/hungary/map13.gif

Ethnographic Map of Bukovina Based on the Census of 1910
http://www.bukovinasociety.org/map-room.html

Open Street Maps
The crowd-sourced mapping project OpenStreetMap has amassed a million contributors since its inception in 2005 and, according to navigation app maker Skobbler, boasts greater accuracy in England, Russia and Germany than rivals such as Google Maps.  I tried the site and found an accurate drawing of my father's ancestral town Tal'ne, Ukraine.  Almost every country is available as is most towns
http://openstreetmap.org


Photos of Tombstones in various Jewish Cemeteries in Galicia and Bukovina

http://jgaliciabukovina.net/98/article/galleries


Shtetls of Bukovina

   
Lost shtetl of Bukowina
http://ewigerjude.blogspot.com/2010/12/lost-shtetl-in-bukovina.html

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/shtetls_bukovina.htm

http://www.bukovinasociety.org/map-room.html

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/18M03uX8K4szAMgPABAUkxkO8wggw2r5qhaP3-r0hqH4/edit?headers=false#gid=1814596747


Apicisa

   Czechoslovakia 1938

A tiny shtetl near Upper-Apsha, with few Jews  since most of them were already murdered in 1941. Having had that bitter experience behind them, they went into hiding in 1944 and did not enter the ghetto. Despite the searches of the Ruthenians who served as the hunting dogs of the Hungarian gendarmes, they succeeded to remain in hiding for two whole months. Given the existing conditions, this was a very long time - until the detective instinct of the excellent Ruthenian police-dogs hit upon their tracks. Of course the Hungarian gendarmes were called immediately. These Jews also hit upon good fortune. Since all the ghettos in the country had already been liquidated, they were sent to Budapest, confined to a concentration-camp and managed to remain alive
http://israeluutisiani.blogspot.com/2014/05/marmaros9.html

 
http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Banilow

"Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina" 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html
 

Maps

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/maps.htm


Bicskof

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Bistra (Bystra)

The Ruthenian Geargia Godinka saved 8 Jews from Bistra and provided them with food. Godinka was invited to Israel by the survivors and he visited there in the winter of 1969, when he was 80 years of age.
http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Botosani

Located today in Romania
http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/83120

http://www.romaniatourism.com/jewish-heritage.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom1_00029.html


Brister 

"We stand in awe before the heroic act of that man from the village of Brister (Zvi Farkash, who climbed out of the mass-grave, overpowers a Hungarian soldier, dons his uniform, takes his weapons, reaches Budapest and there joins the Jewish underground resistance forces"
http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Budest 

In contrast to the behavior of the Ruthenians, the documents in our possession testify to the fact that the Romanians shared the plight of the Jews and tried to help them. Like the residents of Lower-Wisho, who brought food to the ghetto, their own and what was taken from the Jews, this despite the beatings they received at the hands of the gendarmes for doing so; and as the Jews of Budest tell us, the Romanian farmers did not cooperate with the Hungarians in searching for Jews in hiding. The fact is that 16 Jews from Budest managed to survive the months of mass-executions, until the liberation, and that the Romanian peasants not only did not betray them, but provided them with food and misled the gendarmes searching for them

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Burshtyn


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities
 

http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134890/articles/cemeteries 


Cacica

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig


Chernivtsi   (Ger. Czernowitz, Czerniowce


http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/czernowitz6/members/production/index.html

In 1930 , the city had 112 427 inhabitants and the ethnic composition was as follows: Jews 38%, Romania 27%, Germany 15%, Ukrainians (Rusyns) 10%, 8%, Poles, Russians 1.3%. The number of Poles also included hundreds of Polish Armenians .

http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Czerniowce

The capital city. The German (Austrian) name is Czernowitz. The LDS has no Jewish records. Czernowitzers, Family Finder, Address Finder, Street Name translator, Photos, maps, trip reports and more are available at
http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/menu.html

Czernowitz
The purpose of the site is to provide a collection point for materials (stories, histories, photographs, lists, maps, links, etc.) that are of interest to list members and other researchers concerned with genealogy and the history of the Jewish community in the Czernowitz area. The Czernowitz-L Discussion Group

czernowitz.ehpes.com


 Maps

Click here to get to the Original Map Collection page. Note some maps may be available in higher resolution than shown on the website and can be mailed to you as an Email: attachment. Email: the web person for details.

Research
Another database for Czernowitz Ober-Gymnasium is currently in progress.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/Popovici.html

http://www.ucpress.edu/content/chapters/11263.ch01.pdf

http://www.ghostsofhome.com/

http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/hyl-cz-jewish-culture.htm

List of Towns in the Chernivtsi Oblast
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_villages_in_Chernivtsi_Oblast


Dibeve

See also "Ganice"

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Dolha

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Ganice

The testimony of a Jew from the village of Ganice is quite instructive: “The Ruthenians displayed jubilation and teased the Jews, upon seeing the Jews' bitter fate. Among these, non-Jews with whom one lived and did business with, in friendship, trust and good-neighborly relationships for decades.” This man's testimony continues, “And this is one of the reasons that the Jews were deterred from escaping to the nearby forests.” In some cases the Ruthenian peasants with their own hands killed Jews who tried to hide. There were times when the Jews preferred to give themselves up to the Hungarian gendarmes rather than falling into the hands of the Ruthenians, who would torture the Jews before murdering them; and the tales of the Jews of Dibeve which assert that there were several cases of attempted escape, but not one of them was successful, for the Ruthenians took part in the chase and search for the Jews hiding in the forests and betrayed them to the gendarmes.

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Gura Humorului Jewish Community

The aim of these pages is to provide a photographic record and to provide the burial records of the Gura Humorului Jewish cemetery (Romania), and others records from the Jewish community of that town, for the benefit of those genealogists who live some distance away and for the decedents of Gura Humorului Jewish community
http://humora.tripod.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gura_Humorului

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/07/travel/07iht-GRUBER.html

http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/czernowitz12/testfile2006/0071.html


Iza

A ghetto, briefly described at
http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Kasely

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Kitsman (now in Ukraine) aka Cotmani; Kotzman, Kuchmeh, Cosmeni, Kocman, Kicman,  Cotman, 
                     Copzmeni, Koshman, Kozmeny       
Ukrainian Shtetls

Yizkor Book
"Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina" 

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bukowinabook/buk2_090.html

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1042070


Leszkowka [Laskowka, Laskovka], Austria

    

LDS Film 897093 includes the Austro-Hungarian Empire Postal Gazetteer for 1910. A very useful book for finding towns with post offices.

This also has a cross reference to alternate names for towns. The preferred name  was Laszkowka. Alternate names were: Laschkowka (o with acute accent) Laskiwca (with inverted carat on s, Czech spelling?) Laszkiwka (L with a slash, Polish spelling?)  The directory suggests rail access via the Luzan - Zaleszczyki line, or road from Kotzmann. The area was known as Kotzman (one n!). From a posting by Harry Dodsworth  af877@freenet.carleton.ca  
http://www.polishjews.org/places/005.htm

http://www.lvov.us/galician-genealogy/2000

http://www.evri.com/location/dynow-0xff2f3


Luh  (Tiszalonka, Lonka, Leh, Lug)

 
   A view of the town -  The Hungarian village of Lonka was cut into two parts after WWI, when
   the Tisza River became a national border. The other half became
Lunca la Tisa, Romania.

 
  http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz.htm

Cemetery
In many places in Galicia and Bukovina, the Jewish cemeteries are the only material remnants of the Jewish community. Some of the cemeteries and tombstones date back to the 16th century.

Cemeteries and burial ceremonies had an important place in the religious life and cultural experience of the Jews of Eastern Europe, and great effort was therefore expended on commemorating the departed through the unique language of tombstone art. Many of these tombstones have significant artistic value, and give us a unique window into the inner life of many generations of Jews, their beliefs and the opinions and the world views of the surrounding cultures
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134890/articles/cemeteries


Lysiec

Cemetery
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134890/articles/cemeteries


Marmaros County

   This is an awesome map of the family seat of my father's side.The old Austro-Hungarian Empire where Marmaros County was.<br />See Marmaros-Szighet for my father's Mother and for the family home it was in the village of Luh.<br />Luh was also known as Tiszalonka, Lonka, Leh, or Lug dpeneding on language used.

   http://www.bigmeathammer.com/albumauschwitz/album/index.html


Nadworna

Cemetery
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134890/articles/cemeteries


Nizhniye Stanovtsy  (Nyzhni Stanivitzi, Nyzhni Stanivitzi [Ukr], Staneştii de Jos [Rom], Unter-Stanestie
                                             [Ger],
 Nizhniye Stanovtsy [Rus], Stanowce Wielki [Pol], Untershtaneshti, 
                                           
Staneshti, Staneshti De-Zhos, Nischnije Stanowzy, Unterstanestie am 
                                          
Czeremosch, Stăneştii-de-Jos-pe-Ceremuş, Stanivcy Welyky nad Czoremoszom.
)

"Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html
 

http://iguide.travel/Chernivtsi/Overview 

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/shtetls_bukovina.htm

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/suceava.htm


Pechenizhin (Pechenezhin, Pechenezh, Pecenizyn, Pechenizhyn, Petchinizhin)

Located in the Kolomyja District, it is a small town in western Ukraine on the Luchka and Pecheniga rivers, 12 km. from Kolomya. It was in the possession of a nobleman. We know that Jews resided there as early as the 18th century, since the wooden synagogue in the town, complete with its spectacular wall paintings, dates to this time. The population of the town – both Jewish and non-Jewish – grew significantly following the discovery of oil wells at the end of the 19th century. In 1890 there were 2,224 Jews in Pechenizhyn (out of 6,838 inhabitants), but with the decrease in oil production the Jewish population of the town dwindled, with many leaving for other locations in Galicia or abroad. During the Holocaust the Jews of Pechenizhyn were deported to the Kołomyja ghetto, where they died together with the Jews of Kolomyja.

Cemetery

 

      Tombstone of:
 Arie Leibush Son of Shlomo in Pechenezhin cemetery

http://jgaliciabukovina.net/110745/community/pechenezhinCemetery

http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134890/articles/cemeteries


Radauti

 
http://radautz-jewisheritage.org/oldradauti1.htm 

The Jewish cemetery of Radautz (Radauti) was established in 1831. A group of people, led by Bondy Stenzler has initiated cemetery documentation process. The headstones are photographed and then a database was prepared. As for this moment, about 3,000 names (out of the approx. 7,700) are documented and the work continues. The site includes a list of all names recorded at this phase, using (with permission) an extension of the JewishGen JOWBR format (plus Hebrew names and dates). A small portion of the names is already linked to headstone medium-to-high quality photographs. From a posting by Yosef Yagur
http://radautz-jewisheritage.org/

There is still a Radauti organization in Israel, along with several other groups associated with towns in Bukovina.  The Weltverbandes der Bukowiner Juden has developed a web site with complete contact information.  Here is the starting page:
http://www.bukovinajewsworldunion.org

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C4%83d%C4%83u%C5%A3i

Movie
Last Jews of Radauti

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/last_jews_of_radauti/

Here you will find the list of  contacts for various towns, including Radauti:
http://www.bukovinajewsworldunion.org/English/6Communities/
Addres.Buk.html    

The group from Radauti is called "The Organization of Former Residents of Radautz-Bukovina in Israel".  They continue to send aid twice a year to the few needy Jews still remaining in Radauti and in the surrounding area.  Bruce Reisch bir1@NYSAES.CORNELL.EDUradautz.html

Database
Of more than 250 graduates from the years 1885 - 1896 of the Ober-Gymnasium (secondary school) in Radautz, Bukowina (now Radauti, Romania). In addition to the year of birth, the profession and town of residence in 1897 is given for each graduate.  Webmaster is Peter Elbau
http://mypage.bluewin.ch/bukowina/StudRad.html
  

Other site for Radautz
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/radauti/radautz.html
 

http://candlesticksonstone.wordpress.com/

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00516.html


Rohatyn


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Cemetery
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134890/articles/cemeteries


Rozhniatoy

Cemetery
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134890/articles/cemeteries


Sadgura  (now Ukraine)

Now located in Ukraine, but formerly in Bukowina. Memoirs on the Sadgura ShtetLinks web site recalling life in Sadgura (Bukovina) and Chotin (Ukraine) in the early 1900s.  Jack (Yankel) Becker tells the story of his early years in this 1974 oral history - interview with his daughter, Elizabeth  becker.html Also sadgura.html

Nick Martin 4accord@bendnet.com is translating some key reference works concerning this shtetl; the relevant chapter from Pinkas Hakehillot, and the chapter from Hugo Gold's 1962, "Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina" is translating some key reference works concerning this shtetl; the relevant chapter from Pinkas Hakehillot, and the chapter from Hugo Gold's 1962, "Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina"

http://www.isro-press.net/www.bukovinajewsworldunion.org/English/3
Bukovina.History/Buk.Reisch.Geneao.html
  

http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/links/links-L.html

http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/reunionposts/archives/chernivtsiarc.html

http://www.dinur.org/resources/resourceKeywordManual.aspx?letter=S&rsid=0


Sherivtsi (Shirivtsy, Shirivtsi, Szeriwce)

See Chernivtsi


Solotvin


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Cemetery
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134890/articles/cemeteries

The Jewish cemetery in Solotvin was not damaged at all during the Holocaust and was fully documented
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/146018/article/solotvin-story-galician-schtetl


Suceava 

Located in Romania today. Once the capital of Moldova (from 1388 until 1565), Suceava is an excellent starting point for trips to the many historical, cultural and natural attractions travelers can enjoy in the Bucovina region.

  
Synagogue in Suceava

http://shadowsoftime.co.nz/synagogues/suceava.html

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0019_0_19328.html

"The Book of Suceava Jews"
http://shotzer.com/zope/home/he/1/thanks_en

http://www.romaniatourism.com/suceava.html

http://genforum.genealogy.com/romania/messages/3548.html


Suceava County

Located in the southern half of the area formerly known as Bukovina.  The northern portion of Bucovina is now part of the Ukraine.  This site includes maps 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/suceava.htm
 


Sziget 

"An almost unbelievable story of those three courageous girls from Sziget (Rochel Tsifser and the Deutsch sisters, Elvira and Magda), who kill by gun-fire the non-Jew who turns from their supplier of food into an extortionist and rapist - an unprecedented incident"
http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Tecs

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm

 


Templom

 

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/albumkratz/album/index.html


Tlumach


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Cemetery
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134890/articles/cemeteries


Veliatin

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Vilhovitz

 

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm

 

 
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