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Use this search box to search all Jewish Web Index pages

Some graphics are from other sites without
permission but with a link to the site

Please note that not all links will work mostly because the
link has been changed or deleted by their respective owner.


http://alabamamaps.ua.edu/historicalmaps/  

http://www.ontariogenealogy.com/

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/vital-statistics/index-e.html

Canada has more lakes than the rest of the world combined and it is the world's second largest country.  Canada is Huron-Iroquoian Indian word (Kanata) meaning "Big Village or Settlement".

There are ten provinces (Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Saskatchewan).  There are three territories: Northwest Territories, Yukon, and Nunavut.  Ottawa, Ontario is the capital city.

Recent studies show that Canadian Jews tend to be more traditional than their American cousins.  About 40 percent of the Canadian Jews identify themselves as being Orthodox Jews; 40 percent as Conservative Jews and 20 percent as Reform Jews.  The Canadian Jewish Community grew during the 1990s to nearly 330,000.  The 2001 Canadian census indicates that the Jewish population increased by 3.7% during the 1990s.  More than half of Canada's Jews, 190,800, live in the province of Ontario.  About 175,000 live in the Toronto area.

Canada is one of the least densely populated and most prosperous countries in the world. The population of approximately 32,225,000 in 2009, is spread out over a vast 9,984,670 square kilometers (3,855,101 square miles).  By comparison, the population of the United States is approximately 305,000,000, ten times  that of Canada


Legal Databases

Juricaf is a free, searchable, francophone database of primarily Supreme Court decision from over 40 countries. Developed with the support of the International Organisation de la Francophonie and the French Ministry of Justice, its objective is to make supreme court decisions, particularly those of African countries, freely available. Coverage varies country to country. The database includes over 700,000 French court decisions, over 4,000 decisions of the Canadian Supreme Court, and a handful of decisions from a number of African countries. You can browse case law by country or search across multiple jurisdictions
http://hastingslawlibrary.wordpress.com/2012/11/07/new-database-for-researching-case-law-in-francophone-countries/


Open Street Maps
The crowd-sourced mapping project OpenStreetMap has amassed a million contributors since its inception in 2005 and, according to navigation app maker Skobbler, boasts greater accuracy in England, Russia and Germany than rivals such as Google Maps.  I tried the site and found an accurate drawing of my father's ancestral town Tal'ne, Ukraine.  Almost every country is available as is most towns
http://openstreetmap.org


Wonder how German/Austrian-born Jews got to Canada and Australia

In May 1940 the British rounded up all male "enemy aliens" including tens of thousands of Jewish refugees who had been given security clearance earlier by local "tribunals." (It is suspected that this was a public opinion ploy to "prove" to the public that the British exerted some sort of power, despite the defeat at Dunkirk.)  The men were marched through the streets and jeered by the local population as "captured spies."  Most were sent to the Isle of Man (in the Irish Sea) and put up in the empty hotels.

The British offered them an opportunity to go to Canada or Australia, and promised to arrange for their families to follow.  They were put on military transports together with captured German soldiers.  The British ship officers regarded the Germans as "honorable" soldiers (and the Jews as cowards who had betrayed their German homeland) and put the German POW's in charge. 

The crossings were severely traumatic experiences and there were many suicides among the Jews.  Most of those interned in IoM were released, after further security processing, in late 1940.  The families did not, of course, get sent over to be with their husbands and fathers.  Posted by Michael Bernet


 

Books  
             


"Biographical Dictionary of Canadian Jewry 1909 - 1914"  
 
Authored by Lawrence Tapper


"The Books of Remembrance"
Contains the names of Canadians who fought in wars and died either during or after them. These books are now available on-line


"A Checklist of Registers of Protestant & Jewish Congregations in Quebec"
 
Authored by Neil Broadhurst Jewish Genealogy etc.


"A Coat of Many Colours: Two Centuries of Jewish Life in Canada"  
 

Authored by Irving Abella and published in Toronto by Lester & Orpen Dennys in 1990. Jewish Genealogy etc.


"Jewish Experiences in Early Manitoba"
Authored by Arthur A. Chiel and published by Manitoba Jewish Publications in 1955 Jewish Genealogy etc.


"Jews in Manitoba: A Social History"
Authored by Arthur A. Chiel and published in Toronto by the University of Toronto Press in 1961


"Journey into our Heritage: The Story of the Jewish People in the Canadian West"
Probably no longer in print. authored by Henry Gutkin and published in Toronto by Lester & Orpen Dennys in 1980. Jewish Genealogy etc.


"Land of Promise" The Jewish Historical Society of Alberta
has a photo history book of the Jews who settled in Calgary and surrounding area.


"Sources in the United States and Canada" (The Encyclopedia of Jewish Genealogy, Vol 1) - Authored by M Weiner  


"Through Narrow Gates: A Review of Jewish Immigration Colonization and Immigrant Aid Work in Canada (1840-1940)"
Authored by Simon Belkin and published in Montreal by Canadian Jewish Congress and Jewish Colonization Association in 1966 Jewish Genealogy etc.

 

General  
Canadian Genealogy Information  

Allen County Public Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana

An excellent source for Canadian and Ellis Island Passenger lists as well as other material.  
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/


Archives

Form 30A: Dmytro Zmendak, 1923. Library and Archives Canada, RG 76 C1j, reel T-15248.
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/022/022-908.004-e.html

Library and Archives Canada provides all Canadians with access to the documentary heritage of Canada and strives to make known that heritage. It acquires and preserves private papers, publications, maps, photographs and other documents in all forms; it receives publications through legal deposit; and as the permanent repository for all Government of Canada records, it serves as our country’s continuing memory.A source of enduring knowledge, Library and Archives Canada contributes to the cultural, social and economic advancement of Canada as a free and democratic society. It promotes and facilitates cooperation among library and archival communities involved in the acquisition, preservation and diffusion of knowledge www.collectionscanada.gc.ca

Address

Canadian Genealogy Centre
Library and Archives Canada
395 Wellington Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N4 CANADA

Telephone
613-996-7458 or 1-866-578-7777
(Monday–Friday, 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. EST)

Fax 613-995-6274

Email inquiries should be sent through our website
www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/022/f2/022-607.001-e.pdf


Arrival in Canadian Ports - circa 1912

 
http://www.maggieblanck.com/Immigration.html

Country of birth and race entries - ship manifests information.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.0008-3658.2004.00071.x/full

http://www.immigrationdirect.ca/tracing-family-history-canada-immigration-citizenship-genealogy-guide/

http://www.theshipslist.com/Research/canadarecords.htm

http://www.ancestry.com/learn/library/article.aspx?article=2053

http://www.family-historian.com/sources/passenger_lists/

The Pursers were instructed to fill in the information required in columns 17 (Country of Birth) and 19 (Race of People). Immigration officials were responsible for columns 3 (Amount of Cash $) and 20 (Destination Post Office)  Different color forms were to be used for each of three classes: steerage - white, interims  - yellow and saloon - blue. The countries were mostly European and reflected the great fragmentation of the Balkan States at the time (Serbia, Croatia and Dalmatia) There were some anomalies in that names were listed for some geographical entities that were not a state e.g. Galicia.

There were five categories of the Hebrew race: Hebrew NES (Not Otherwise Specified), Hebrew Austrian, Hebrew German, Hebrew Polis and Hebrew Russian. In the column under religious Denomination, Hebrew would be shown for persons of the Hebrew race.  Some Pursers preferred to us the term Jew instead of Hebrew in spite of the fact that the term Jew was not included in the listing of races.  Ukrainian is not listed, the official term listed is "Ruthenian" (Russniak).

The immigrants were required to have at least $25 in cash when they landed.  That would equate to two or three hundred of today's dollars.

Pier21

Many Canadians and some U.S. citizens arrived in the 'new country' at Pier 21 on the Halifax waterfront.  Actually 1.5 million immigrants first set foot on Canadian soil at this pier. During WW II, 3,000 British evacuee children, 50,000 war brides and their 22,000 children, over 100,000 refugees and 368,000 Canadian troops bound for Europe passed through Pier 21.  Check out this site
http://www.pier21.ns.ca/pier21.html
 

http://www.pier21.ca/research/

Manifests
Indexed for all ports for the period 1925-1935

http://www.archives.ca/02/02011802_e.html 

http://www.theshipslist.com/Forms/index.htm

http://stevemorse.org/

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy/022-908.003-e.html

US Ports of Entry
Many immigration stations were set up along the Canadian borders as well as other seaports on the east, west and Texas coast.  Passenger manifest information for these ports have been archived and are available on microfilm at the National Archives as well as the Family History Centers.
http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/ports/

http://www.dhs.gov/files/programs/editorial_0685.shtm

http://www.genesearch.com/ports.html

http://www.portcodes.com/

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/immigration-1925/001012-100.01-e.php

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/exploration/index-e.html

National Archives of Canada Immigrant Database 1925-1935
http://www.archives.ca/02/020118_e.html

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/grosse-ile-immigration/001053-130-e.html

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/immigration-1925/001012-130-e.html

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/immigration-1925/index-e.html

http://www.norwayheritage.com/Searching-the-Canadian-Immigration-Records.htm

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/immigrants/


Bension Collection of Sephardic Manuscripts

An excellent summary descriptions of the manuscripts are at the Alberta University Library  
http://www.orthohelp.com/geneal/sefardim.htm

http://www.mail-archive.com/hasafran@lists.acs.ohio-state.edu/msg05893.html

http://www.umass.edu/sephardimizrahi/past_issues/060115.html


Canadian Addresses

There are some very valuable sites, believe me.  I have used these sites in my continuous researching of my wife's family --- SMOLKIN --- from Ossipovich, Belarus who emigrated to Montreal in the late 1800s.  Should you, in your research come across this surname, I would appreciate, as a favor to my wife, if you would let me know if you find any information about the Smolkin name.  It will be most appreciated.
   I sincerely hope you too will find a great amount of interesting information from this site.

About 25% of Canadians have at least one family tie to the U.S., if you go back 2 to 3 generations.  So, if you are in need of Canadian documents, Eve Greenfield suggests the following:  "I got the info from the State Department's Foreign Affairs Manual, which lists addresses to write for biographic docs all over the world.  For Manitoba, the appropriate agency is: 
Vital Statistics Agency
254-258 Portage Ave.
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Canada R3C OB6 
Ask them to send you a request form for the genealogical birth certificate; Canada issues three types of birth certificates, but the genealogical one is actual microfilm copy of the form that was filled out when the birth was recorded.  The fee is $25 Canadian (US $18), which you will need to send them probably in the form of a postal money order.  

One catch:  you will need the written permission of the individuals in question to have documents released to you, if they are living, or permission of their next of kin, if they are deceased.

http://www.melissadata.com/lookups/canadianaddressverify.asp

http://www.whitepages.ca/

http://ca.dir.yahoo.com/reference/Phone_Numbers_and_Addresses/


Canadian Archives

The Canadian Archives website provides detailed information on how to access immigration records, border crossings and passenger lists.  They offer some level of researcher services.  There is also an on-line database covering the years 1925-1935 -- searchable by surname, given name, ship, port of arrival, year of arrival.  It can take a bit of time and sometimes, imagination, on how names might have been spelled, but it works. 
http://www.archives.ca/exec.naweb.dll?fs&02020204&e&top&0

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/index-e.html

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0005605

National Archives of Canada
Offers a highly useful booklet that is downloadable at

http://www.archives.ca/00/00_e.html#top  
and click on "Publications".  Available in both English and French.

The Canadian government did not keep records of people leaving the country; however, in 1895, the United States established border ports along the International Boundary and began recording arrivals from Canada.  These lists are in the custody of the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, D.C. 20408

To request information from the Province where the Naturalization was obtained
Obtain a Freedom of Information form, from government sources or on-line and send the form with the fee of $5.00 and the request to the Citizenship and Immigration Department in Ottawa.  Proof of death of the individual is required or permission from that person for the release of the information, if the person you are researching is alive.

Records of immigrants arriving at Canadian land and sea ports from January 1, 1936 onwards
Remain in the custody of Citizenship and Immigration Canada.  Requests for copies of landing records should be mailed to their office as noted in their web site at 
http://www.archives.ca 

Nanaimo Family History Society
Passenger List Indexing Project

http://members.shaw.ca/nanaimo.fhs/

The National Archives of Canada
Provides detailed information on how to access immigration records, border crossings and passenger lists.  The also offer some research services.  Also, you will find an on-line database covering the years 1925 to 1935 - searchable by surname, given name, ship, port of arrival and year of arrival.  However, the site also says that in order to obtain a Naturalization Records, one must either live in Canada; be a Canadian Citizen; or apply from Canada.  There is a form to be filled out which is only available in Canada, plus a fee.  
http://www.archives.ca/exec/naweb.dll?fs&02020204&e&top&0  

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/index-e.html

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/immigrants/

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/02/020202_e.html

Like the United States, Canada has a number of excellent sites, including Immigration Records; Land Grants; Port of Entry Lists; Passenger Ship Arrivals and more.  Emigration information of the nineteenth century and the ships they came on - are a great starting point for solid research information 
http://www.ist.uwaterloo.ca/~marj/genealogy/thevoyage.html 

http://members.shaw.ca/nanaimo.fhs/

The immigrant records of those entering Canada are in the Canadian Archives in Ottawa and the US records of those who crossed from Canada are in the National Archives in Washington with copies at various branches around the United States.  Immigration records for the years 1924-1935 are available at the Canadian Archives website
http://www.archives.ca/02/02011802_e.html

http://www.ingeneas.com/free/index.html

http://www.archivescanada.ca/english/index.html

http://www.archivescanada.ca/

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/02/020115_e.html

Library & Archives Canada - Immigration Records
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/02020204_e.html


Canadian Arrival Manifests

Available for many years on microfilm for the ports of Quebec and Halifax/Saint John, NB from 1867 to 1919 at the Canadian National Archives.  Later manifests were held by the Immigration Department and the information could only be obtained using the access to Information Act procedures, which were not simple.  Manifests (or microfilms) from 1919 to 1935 have been transferred to Archives and  are undergoing processing.  This has proved to be much more time consuming than the Archives expected and some of the old microfilms were not of archival quality and were very difficult to copy.
http://law.justia.com/us/cfr/title08/8-1.0.1.2.44.html

http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/immigration/northern-ny-state-arrivals.html

http://www.mcculloughgenealogy.com/manifest.htm

Over a million indexed records and images for Canadian passenger lists (1881-1922) are now searchable at FamilySearch.org.

The database includes records for Canadian ports–Quebec City, Halifax, St. John, North Sydney, Vancouver and Victoria–as well as U.S. ports for passengers who reported Canada as their final destination
http://lisalouisecooke.com/tag/immigration/


Canadian Censuses

Has always allowed access to its census records 92 years after collection of the data.  The 1901 census was released to the public in 1993.  In 2003, the 1911 census was released.

The Canada 1921 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population taken on 1 June 1921 when the total population of Canada was about 8.7 million people. Census returns remain at Statistics Canada until 92 years after the taking of a census and are not available to the public.

On 1 June 2013, the 1921 Census will be transferred to Library and Archives Canada and will be made public shortly after that date. Estimated availability dates haven't been published yet. I wouldn't expect the Canadian 1921 census to be available on the morning of June 2, but it should appear on the Web within a few months after that date. You can learn more in a new Wikipedia page started by Helen Riding at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_1921_Census

That page also contains links to several other web sites. Of course, as with everything on Wikipedia, if you have more details than what is already posted there, you are invited to add your information. From Eastman's Blog
http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2013/02/canada-1921-census.html

http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/news/Pages/2013/1921-census.aspx

http://globalgenealogy.com/Census  

http://automatedgenealogy.com/census11/

http://stevemorse.org/census/canada1911.html

http://genealogy.about.com/b/2005/07/22/1911-canadian-census-now-online.htm

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/census-records.htm

1881 Census records are online
And on CDs at the LDS centers.
http://www.familysearch.org   

http://www.familysearch.org/eng/default.asp

http://genealogy.lovetoknow.com/1881_Canadian_Census_Records

1901 Census for Canada
Has much valuable genealogical information, such as names and birth dates for all family members, birthplaces and sometimes a year of immigration and occupation.  The National Archives is located in Ottawa.


Canada has always allowed access to its census records 92 years after collection of the data. The 1901 census was released to the public in 1993.  In 2003, the 1911 census was scheduled to be released, but there appears to be a problem with the release for further information.  Information obtained from Paul Silverstone.
http://globalgenealogy.com/Census

The English version of the 1901 Census explanation can be found at
http://www.archives.ca/02/0201220618_e.html

http://www.archives.ca/www/svcs/english/GenealogicalSources.html#Citzenship.Records

http://www.1901censusonline.com/search.asp?wci=person_search

http://search.ancestry.com/iexec/?htx=List&dbid=8826

http://www.searchforancestors.com/free1901census.html

Canadian census of 1901.  
The entries given are in easily readable form, and there is a place for one to enter corrections.  The original census records are also visible.
www.archives.ca/02/020122/02012209_e.html

http://automatedgenealogy.com/census/

http://stevemorse.org/census/canada1901b.html

1901/1906 Canadian census
The website is fully searchable. The actual image from the National Archives of  Canada is available.
http://www.automatedgenealogy.com/index.html

http://automatedgenealogy.com/census/

http://stevemorse.org/census/canada1911.html

http://www.1930census.com/canadian_census.php

The English version of the 1901 Census explanation can be found at 
http://www.archives.ca/02/0201220618_e.html
 
and states:

Color to be denoted by:

    * "W" for whites (people of European descent)
    * "R" for red (Native Canadians)
    * "B" for black (people of African descent)
    * "Y" for yellow (people of Japanese and Chinese descent)

The French version is available at
http://www.archives.ca/02/0201220618_f.html
 
and states:

    * "B" pour blanche (personnes d'origine europeenne)
    * "R" pour rouge (autochtones canadiens)
    * "N" pour noire (personnes d'origine africaine)
    * "J" pour jaune (personnes d'origine japonaise ou chinoise)

How they distinguish between "B" for black and "B" for blanche (white) is not clear


Canadian Genealogical source

Has links to: Census records; Birth, marriage, death, divorce and adoption records, land records, Métis records, wills and estate records, Military records, Immigration records, Home children, Citizenship (naturalization) records, Loyalist sources, LI-RA-MA (Russian Consular records), Employment records, school records and newspapers.

If you have a family member who entered North America through Canada, the following site lists microfilm and microfiche of Imperial Russian Consular Records in Canada for the years 1898-1922. The Passport/Identity Papers series consists of about 11,400 files on Russian and East European immigrants (Jews, Ukrainians, Poles, Finns, etc.) who settled in Canada in the first two decades of the twentieth century.  The files include documents such as passport applications and background questionnaires.  Many of the records are written in Russian Cyrillic; the National Archives does not provide a translation service. Nothing more was stated regarding further research on this Collection and not all individuals who came to Canada from Russia are included as some did not come in contact with the Consular Offices. However, this seems to be a good tool to find not only Russian ancestors, but those from Lithuania and other areas outside Russia proper.
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/index-e.html

The Likacheff-Ragosine-Mathers Collection (LI-RA-MA)
Contains documents created between 1898 and 1922 by the Canadian consular offices of the Tsarist Russian Empire. The series on passports and identity papers (many with photos) contains approximately 11,400 files on Jewish, Ukrainian and Finnish immigrants who came to Canada from the Russian Empire. Also included are passport applications and questionnaires containing general information. Nearly half the database is now available online.
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/li-ra-ma/index-e.html

http://genealogy.about.com/od/canada/tp/top_databases.--l1.htm

http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7920

http://www.canadiangenealogy.net/free_source_summary.htm

Application for copies of the Naturalization records
Must be submitted on an Access to Information request Form (this form can be picked up at a Public Library or a Government Office).  A check for $5.00 payable to Receiver General For Canada must be enclosed.  Proof of death, copy of certificate, obit, photo of  gravesite must be included.  Include all known information: Full name, date and place of birth, certificate #, if known.  If applying for a search for your own citizenship records, the cost is $75.00.  If you only require a photo copy - file a Personal Information Request Form - there is no fee for this service.
http://www.archives.ca/www/svcs/english/GenealogicalSources.html#Citzenship.
Records

http://www.naturalizationrecords.com/canada/

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/naturalization-1915-1932/001055-150-e.html

Ship Manifests
Application for copies of the Naturalization records must be submitted on an Access to Information Request Form (can be picked up at a Public Library or a Government office). A check for $5.00 payable to Receiver General For Canada must be enclosed.  Proof of death, copy of certificate, obit, photo of gravesite must be included.  Include all known information including: Full name, date and place of birth, certificate # if known.  If applying for a search for your own citizenship records, the cost is $75.00.  If you only require a photo copy - file a Personal Information Request Form - there is no fee for this service
http://www.archives.ca/08/08_e.html

http://www.members.shaw.ca/nanaimo.fhs/

http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2005/12/canadian_ship_m.html

http://www.searchforancestors.com/records/passenger_tocanada.html


Canadian Genealogy Resources 

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy/html

http://main.library.utoronto.ca/eir/resources.cfm

http://www.canadiangenealogy.net/

http://genealogy.about.com/od/canada/Canadian_Genealogy_Family_History_Research_in_Canada
.htm

http://www.kindredtrails.com/canada.html


Canadian History

The Canadiana Discovery Portal searches through 60 million pages of Canada history from 14 different institutions.  It is in beta at this time as you can tell by the page and is in English, but there is a link to the French version.
http://beta.canadiana.ca/co/en


Canadian Immigration

There is quite a bit of information and essays and links that I need to explore at some future date, but you can start the process now
http://www.tccweb.org/immigrat.htm
 

http://www.canadavisa.com/

http://www.mun.ca/mha/

http://members.shaw.ca/nfhs_fodh/fodhindex.html

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/publications/legacy/preface.asp

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=93C0006&lang=eng

Assimilation / Destination: Canada / Hamburg & Bremen / Immigrants and Epidemics / Life In
Canada
/ Reasons For Immigration To America
And including: Immigrants to Canada in Nineteenth Century; Immigration History Research Center; Immigrant and Passenger Arrivals on Microfilm NARA; Immigration at the turn of the 20th Century; Immigrants and Tenement Life; Locating Ship Passenger Lists;  Passenger Lists on the Internet and more!  
http://www.tccweb.org/immigration.htm
 

http://www.islandnet.com/~daveobee/cangenealogy/immigration.html

http://www.tccweb.org/immigration.htm#Hamburg%20&%20Bremen%20-%20Common%20Ports%20of%20Departure


Canadian Jewish News

A weekly newspaper published in Toronto is probably the most widely read Canadian Jewish newspaper, however there are about 20 Jewish periodicals and newspapers published in Canada today.
http://www.cjnews.com/

http://www.mavensearch.com/subjects/181

http://jgs-montreal.org/quebec-research.html

http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?&id_nbr=8241&&PHPSESSID=ychzfqkvzape


The Canadian Jewish Times of 1909 to 1914

On-line although you have to pay a nominal fee for searching the files located at
www.ancestry.com

http://www.paperbackswap.com/Biographical-Dictionary-Canadian-Jewry-1909/book/0962637300/

http://www.gendir.com/link_detail/664


Canadian Naturalization Residency Requirements

up to 1917         3 year residency

1918 - 1977       5 year residency

1977 - 1985       3 year residency

1985 to present  5 year residency

During some of these periods, the wife did not have to apply for naturalization.  She automatically became a Canadian citizen upon her husband's naturalization.

Though prior to 1947, Canadians were British subjects so anyone coming to Canada, who was a British citizen automatically became a Canadian citizen.


Canadian Pacific Archives

This is an internal department of Canadian Pacific Railway, and provides fee-based services to the public.  To use their services, you must send a detailed request in writing specifying the intended end use.  

Mail to: Canadian Pacific Archives 
PO Box 6042 Station Centre-ville   
Montreal, QC CANADA  H3C 3E4 
Fax: 514 395 5132  Telephone: 514 395 5135 
There are no employee records held by this Archive
http://www8.cpr.ca/cms/English/General+Public/Heritage/default.htm

http://www.trainweb.org/galt-stn/cproster/main.htm

http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%22Canadian%20Pacific%20Railway%20Company%22


Canadian Passenger List Records

Passenger lists (RG 76) were the official immigration documents from 1865 to 1935. The lists contain information such as the name, age, country of origin, occupation and destination of each passenger. The lists are organized by port and date of arrival. This database provides access to passenger lists for the ports of Quebec (1865-1921); Halifax (1881-1912, and soon to 1922); Saint John (1900-1912); North Sydney (1906-1908); Vancouver (1905-1912); and Victoria (1905 to 1912).
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/passenger/index-e.html

For information on researching Canadian lists in other time frames use the link below.  The list is indexed not by passenger name, but by year, ship name, port of departure & arrival, et cetera. If you don't have at least a year & a ship name, searching for a relative would be impossible. It's advisable to put in a minimal amount of information - 1907 - Ottawa (the name of the ship). The manifests are alphabetical by surname. Each manifest includes 6-10 rolls through the alphabet!
http://www.theshipslist.com/Research/canadarecords.htm

http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/

http://www.members.shaw.ca/nanaimo.fhs/


Canadian Postal Lookup

http://www.refdesk.com

http://www.canadapost.ca/cpo/mc/languageswitcher.jsf

http://www.canadapost.ca/cpotools/apps/fpc/personal/findByCity?execution=e1s1

Canadian - Israel Tribute Stamp
http://www.canadapost.ca/cpo/mc/personal/collecting/stamps/2010/2010_Canada_
Israel.jsf


Canadian Resources

A site that offers information and links. Canadian Genealogy Pages; National Resources; Alberta Sites; British Columbia Sites; Manitoba Sites; New Brunswick Sites; Newfoundland and Labrador Sites; Northwest Territories Sites; Nova Scotia Sites; Ontario Sites; Prince Edward Island Sites; Quebec Sites; Saskatchewan Sites; Yukon Territory and Acadian Sites.
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~cgaunt/canada.html  

http://www.hareshima.com/regional/canada.asp

http://www.jewishottawa.org/IR/Listing.aspx?id=3795

http://www.jgstoronto.ca/content/category/5/30/73/

http://globalgenealogy.com/globalgazette/gazrr/gazrr199.htm

http://tevalearningcenter.org/resources.php

http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/~ab522/jewish.html

Canadian Resources
A good site to find people as well as business names and addresses 
http://www.infospace.com/info/cansvcs.htm


Canadian Statistics

http://www.refdesk.com

http://judaism.about.com/od/jewishhumor/f/jewry_canada.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_population_by_cities_and_city_areas

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Canada

http://mqup.mcgill.ca/book.php?bookid=167

http://uottawa.ca.libguides.com/content.php?pid=15417&sid=365276


Canadian Virtual War Memorial

http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/general/sub.cfm?source=collections/virtualmem

http://www.google.com/search?q=Canadian+Virtual+War+Memorial+&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/remembers/sub.cfm?source=collections/virtualmem/detail&casualty=59422

http://automatedgenealogy.com/uidlinks/CVWMList.jsp


Children Emigrants from Canada

http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/famhist/genealgy/can2.htm

http://retirees.uwaterloo.ca/~marj/genealogy/homeadd.html

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/maritime/archive/displayGuide.aspx?sid=12&mode=html&sorStr=&serStr=&pgeInt=&catStr


Free, searchable Canadian Database

http://www.ingeneas.com/free/index.html

www.inGeneas.com

http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/index.shtml

http://www.ingeneas.com/free/index.html

http://www.genwed.com/


Genealogical Resources

http://resources.rootsweb.com/world/ 

http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/index.shtml

http://expertgenealogy.com/free/Canada.htm


Heraldry - Jewish

 

http://www.heraldica.org/topics/jewish.htm

http://www.heraldica.org/topics/jewish.htm

http://archive.gg.ca/heraldry/pub-reg/project-pic.asp?lang=e&ProjectID=374&ProjectElementID=1284


Historical Societies addresses in the US, Canada and Australia

http://www.daddezio.com/society/hill/SH-MT-NDX.html

http://listingsus.com/Society/Genealogy/

http://www.ipl.org/IPLBrowse/GetSubject?vid=13&cid=1&tid=7102&parent=6996


Immigrants in Canada and Ethnic Identity Dynamics

http://sydaby.eget.net/swe/ref_emi.htm

http://ftp.iza.org/dp3050.pdf

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/0022-4537.00225/abstract

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0004186


Immigrants to Canada 

Lots of information about ships arriving in Canada during the 19th century along with info for other countries.  
Immigration to Canada

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/canada.html

http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/Exhibitions/orphans/english/themes/immigration/page1.html

http://www.whitepinepictures.com/seeds/i/1/history2.html

Immigrants to Canada in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century
Ships - Emigration Reports - Emigration Handbooks by Marj Kohli

http://sydaby.eget.net/swe/emi_ref.htm
 

http://www.multiculturalcanada.ca/Encyclopedia/A-Z/p4/4

http://thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0004134


Immigration Records

http://www.archives.ca/www/svcs/english/ImmigrationRecords.html

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy/022-905.008-e.html

http://www.cjh.org/pdfs/Canada07.pdf


Inter-Library Loans

From Canada to US.  Your local public library branch can request a reel from the National Archives in Ottawa for a nominal fee.
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/ill/index-e.html


Jewish Funeral Directors (Canada)

You can search for Funeral Directors by state or city at
http://www.jfda.org/listing_state_city.html  

http://www.jgstoronto.ca/content/view/53/71/

http://www.cyndislist.com/cemetery.htm

http://www.jewish-funerals.org/wjw.htm


Jewish Heritage Centre of Western Canada Jewish Genealogy Links

You will find links to Museum, Holocaust, Genealogy, History and an Archives of the site. Email: the center at heritage@jhcwc.mb.ca Webmaster is Ike Kessler lkessler@lkessler.com 
www.jhcwc.mb.ca
 

http://lkessler.com  

http://www.lkessler.com/genbegin.shtml

http://friedlan.customer.netspace.net.au/links.htm

Jewish Heritage Centre of Western Canada
http://www.jhcwc.org/jhswc.htm


Judaism in the Yukon   United States

An interesting article.  Select the year 1998 for 'back articles' and then Wednesday, August 26, 1998 issue.  The story is well worth reading.  There is also a Jewish Historical Society of the Yukon and there is research of at least one Jewish cemetery.
http://www.yukonweb.com/ 

http://www.joyfulnoise.net/tours/alaska2.html

http://www.adherents.com/Na/Na_409.html

http://www.judaism.com/registry/neworg2.asp


   Maps  (Canadian)

http://sydaby.eget.net/swe/emi_ref.htm 

http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/namerica/ca.htm

http://geography.about.com/od/canadamaps/Canada_Maps_.htm

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/canada.html


McGill University Medical Research Institute Membership List

Useful if searching for Canadian Medical Students and faculty
http://ww2.mcgill.ca/muhc-ri/members.htm
 

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/md-im/activit/sci-com/cardio/sacmducs_ccsmmuac_m_bio-eng.php

http://www.mcgill.ca/ctrg/bios/


Military Records


http://www.jameshmarsh.com/2011/12/454/

On June 6, 1944, Canadian forces took part in the greatest amphibious operaation in military history.  Over 10,000 Canadian seamen in 110 warships and 21,400 soldiers took part in D-Day.  One of five assault beaches, code named Juno, was assigned to the 3rd Canadian Division and the 2nd Canadian Armored Brigade

Genealogy Military Records
http://www.archives.ca/

http://www.jgstoronto.ca/content/view/23/48/

http://www.jcmm.ca/

http://jewishgen.blogspot.com/2010/08/availability-of-wwi-military-records.html

Canadian War Graves Commission
http://www.cwgc.org/

http://www.cwgc.org/content.asp?menuid=8&id=8&menuname=Useful%20Links&menu=main

http://www.dadpeter.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=490.0

http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/youth/sub.cfm?source=links

Maple Leaf Project
Online data base containing photographs of every Canadian soldier grave - world-wide.

http://www.mapleleaflegacy.org/Welcome.htm

http://www.suite101.com/content/the-maple-leaf-legacy-project-a90879

Soldiers of the South African War (1899-1902)
Service files, medal registers and land grant applications of Canadian forces serving in the Boer War
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/south-african-war/index-e.html 


Passenger Lists 1865 - 1935

http://sydaby.eget.net/swe/emi_ref.htm 

Passenger Lists
The inGeneas Database contains passenger list records for immigrants arriving at Canadian ports between 1748 and 1873.  For the most part, these records have been extracted from microfilm of the original manifests held at several archives and libraries.  The inGeneas Database contains records from a variety of immigration records (other than passenger lists) for the time period of 1748 to 1906.  For the most part, these records have been extracted from microfilm of the original records held at several archives and libraries

http://sydaby.eget.net/swe/emi_ref.htm 

http://olivetreegenealogy.blogspot.com/2008/09/canadian-passenger-lists-1865-1935.html

http://www.101genealogy.com/passenger-lists-1865-1935-canada/

http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2008-10/msg00302.html


Postcards Look at the History of Western Canada

The University of Alberta Libraries has a collection of postcards available from the Peel's Prairie Provinces web site.
http://peel.library.ualbert.ca/browse/postcards/


Sending Packages to Ukraine

Meest, Located in New Jersey, has offices at 
Meest Alberta Ltd.
10384 97 St. Edmonton
AB T5H 2M3, Canada
Phone: 403 424 1777 or Fax: 403 421 7134 

http://www.meest.net/eng/
 

http://www.meest.net/eng/disp.cgi?305

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100405012035AAT7YOZ

Customs Regulations for Goods Shipped to Ukraine:
According to the resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine, the following items can be imported to Ukraine tax-free:  food products;  pharmaceuticals (certified in Ukraine); clothing; shoes;  bed linens: and articles of personal hygiene.  If it is obvious that the number of items sent to one recipient is unreasonable and exceeds the quantity necessary for an individual user, these shipments will have to be cleared through the customs as a commercial cargo.  Goods subject to customs duties: TV sets, Video Players and VCRs, computers, radio telephones, etc; household appliances,; genuine leather and fur (new); luxury items; cosmetics; compact discs, tapes.
http://ukraine.visahq.ca/customs/

http://www.tnt.com/express/en_us/site/home/support/customs_and_shipping.html

http://fedex.com/us/international/irc/profiles/irc_ua_profile.html?gtmcc=us


Ships They Came On

Between 1869 and the early 1930s, over 100,000 children were sent to Canada from Great Britain during the child emigration movement.  Members of the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa are locating and indexing the names of these Home Children found in passenger lists in the custody of the National Archives of Canada. A listing of ships coming to Canada that list the date, year, name of the ship, Destination and sex of young immigrants are available in a searchable database  
http://ist.uwaterloo.ca/~marj/genealogy/shps3.html

http://www.bifhsgo.ca/

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy/022-203.002.14-e.html

http://www.qfhs.ca/


St Albans List

St. Alban's is a town in Vermont, but this list nonetheless includes all entries into the US from Canada via Atlantic and Pacific ports and everything in between. A large number of immigrants came to the United States via Canada during the mid- and late nineteenth century, and for them there is no U.S. immigration record. They landed in Canada where no U.S. officer met them or recorded information about their arrival in the United States. The always-growing number of immigrants who chose this route in the late 1800s finally convinced the United States, in 1894, to build and operate the bureaucratic machinery necessary to document the many thousands who each year entered at points along its northern border.  
http://www.nara.gov/publications/prologue/stalbans.html 

St. Albans Canadian border crossing records (Canada to US), St. Albans FAQ
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~holdenclan/albans.htm

http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/stalbanslist.shtml

http://www.webbitt.com/volga2/border.htm

http://www.afhs.ab.ca/aids/talks/notes_mar99.html

Incentives were offered by the Canadian Government, the Railways and some of the shipping companies to bring immigrants to Canada.  The traditional migration route, once the Canadian Pacific Railroad was completed, was either by ship to HalifaxSt. John, Quebec, or Montreal and then by train to various towns in Canada.  Other possibilities for those emigrating to Canada could have been New York to Chicago or Duluth, Minnesota, etc.

They came directly from Europe to western Canada.  Many went to agricultural colonies scattered across the prairies.  The main incentive was the availability of land.  Some had help from the JCA (Jewish Colonization Association, founded by Baron Hirsch) or other similar organizations.

"The only online immigrations records for Canada are for arrivals after 1935, and that's just an index.  But all is not lost. First, you should determine - or guess - at which US border city he came into America.  Records for those crossings do exist, are microfilmed, and available from the Mormon Library, nearby US National Archives, etc. There are the St. Albans Lists, the most well known of the records.  These encompass the many small border towns in New England. There are also two or three sets for New York State border crossings, and records for those who entered via Detroit. These records may indicate when your grandfather actually arrived in Canada - or they may not.  The more you can narrow down the date he arrived, the easier the next step will be."

"The ship arrival lists for Canada *are* microfilmed, and stored at the Canada National Archives.  They are available via inter-library loan to approved institutions in the United States, such as libraries.  There is usually no cost to borrow the films. Note:  The passenger arrival lists are *not* indexed. Additional note:  More often than not, the films are wound backwards on the rolls, which means you don't know the ship's name or arrival date until *after* you've looked at the names. Additional note:  Only the first page of each manifest notes the ship and travel information."

"
Check with your local library about doing an interlibrary or inter-institutional loan.  (Be sure to deal with a library which has microfilm readers onsite).   If they haven't gotten things from the Canada National Archives before, you may want to take them the information from the Canada National Archives website."

For more information on interlibrary loan:
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/ill/index-e.html

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/ill/s16-202-e.html

http://www.ala.org/ala/professionalresources/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet08.cfm

"Another note:  The library has gotten *much* more efficient about shipping microfilms lately. While the backlog used to be 4-6 months, now they ship films within a few days.  However, the loan time period is much shorter than it used to be.  So order fewer films more frequently."

For more information of what is on the microfilms and the film catalogue numbers:
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/index-e.html

On the left side of the page, click on <Browse Selected Topics>, then on <Genealogy and Family History>. Click on the first link in the body of the text, <Genealogy Research, Archive Resources. Find the list of available resources, click in <Immigration>. Click on <Passenger Lists 1865 - 1935. Browse and read."
  From a posting by Hilary Henkin

http://www.collectionscanada.ca

http://www.cyndislist.com/portsentry.htm

http://www.shamash.org/trb/judaism.html

http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2000/fall/us-canada-immigration-records-1.html

For information on Canadian Border Crossing Records see the St. Albans FAQ...

St. Albans FAQ

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~holdenclan/albans.htm

For more details on the St. Albans records go here and scroll down to the Vermont section

US Ports of Arrival and Their Available Passenger Lists (1820-1957)

http://www.genesearch.com/ports.html

http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/immigration/passenger-arrival.html

http://www.germanroots.com/passengers.html 

The former INS (now called the BCIS) has copies of Naturalization records created after late Sept 1906. To learn how to request copies of these see the "Finding Naturalization Records Created after 1906" section here

Finding US Naturalization Records
(A genealogy guide)

http://home.att.net/~wee-monster/naturalizationrecords.html

http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/naturalization/

http://www.germanroots.com/naturalizationrecords.html

http://www.naturalizationrecords.com/usa/

Also see the New York link on that page. Be aware that a search with the INS can take several months.

Microfilms available from the Family History Centers or the National Archives
http://www.nara.gov/publications/microfilm/immigrant/rg85.html#sal

http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/about-genealogy-research.html

http://www.archives.gov/northeast/nyc/finding-aids/passenger-lists.html

http://www.stockton.lib.ca.us/subjects/geneal/genealogy-libraries.htm

Emigrants who found themselves in Canada and decided they wanted to move on to the United States (and went through legally), may be on the St Albans list.  Check out the information available on the NARA website  
http://www.nara.gov/genealogy/immigration/immigrat.html 


Naming Customs in Poland and Ukraine

Also used by Canadian Ukrainians.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~polwgw/naming.html


National Archives of Canada

Canadian Genealogy Resources 
http://www.archives.ca/00/00_e.html#top


Orphanage Information

A database of young immigrants to Canada in the period of 1869 to the early 1930s. 
http://www.archives.ca/02/020110_e.html


Pier 21

Many Canadians and some U.S. citizens arrived in the 'new country' at Pier 21 on the Halifax waterfront.  Actually 1.5 million immigrants first set foot on Canadian soil at this pier.  During WW II, 3,000 British evacuee children, 50,000 war brides and their 22,000 children, over 100,000 refugees and 368,000 Canadian troops bound for Europe passed through Pier 21. 
http://www.pier21.ns.ca/pier21.html 

At this same site, you will find 'Stories of Pier 21' and an 'Index of Ships' that have arrived and/or departed from Pier 21.  The list is not complete, but it is being constantly updated.

Pier 21 - Halifax, Canada
Canada's Historic soul
http://sydaby.eget.net/swe/emi_ref.htm
 
 


Purser

The Purser was a ship's officer.  He filled in certain columns of the Ship's Manifest, based on the documents that the passenger carried. 

Canadian Port  Example:
Amount of Cash in $...
Traveled Inland on... 
Initials of Civil Examiner...

This information was completed by the Immigration Agent at the Port of Landing.


Resource List for Community and Family Histories of Ukrainians in Canada

http://come.to/ukrainian.families


Russian/Jewish Consular Records from 1808 to 1922 for Russians and East Europeans

http://www.archives.ca/www/svcs/english/Genealogy.html


Ship Information, etc.

Passenger List Information:
Can be obtained from special lists containing information including:  name, age, country of , occupation and intended destination of each passenger and are the official record of immigration, during certain periods of time. 

In Canada
These records can be accessed under arrangements made by the National Archives of Canada. 

http://www.archives.ca/exec/naweb.dll?fs&02020204&amp;e&amp;top&amp;0


Telephone Directories on the Web

http://www.teldir.com 

White Pages

                                       

WhitePages.com


Volunteer Look Up Site: Help list Canada

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~canghl/

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~canab/

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~obitl/vwcan.html

http://www.cyndislist.com/lookups.htm

World Directories including Canada   

http://springboard.telstra.com  

http://springboard.telstra.com.au/directories/global.htm


World Pages (covers much of the world)

http://www.eu-info.com/inter/World.asp?Country


Alberta

Archive

Provincial Archives of Alberta
12845 - 102 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
T5N 0M6

Phone: 403 427 1750
Fax:     403 427 4646
Email: paa@mcd.gov.ab.ca

http://culture.alberta.ca/archives/

http://www.archivesalberta.org/walls/paa.htm

http://www.archivesalberta.org/

Jewish Genealogical Society (S. Alberta)
Contact Florence Elman, President at
haflo@shaw.ca  
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgssa/
 

http://www.lac-bac.gc.ca/databases/avitus/001069-119.01-e.php?q1=%22Jewish+Genealogical+Society+%28S.+Alberta%29%22&c1=title_en&brws=2&brws_s=1&PHPSESSID=6jaof31kosa7p5nnd5ffvgt2r2

http://listingsca.com/Alberta/Society/Genealogy/


Alberta Gen Web Site

Local History Book Project
Has 47 local history book  indexes online, encompassing over 25,000 names. 

http://users.rootsweb.com/~canab/index.html

http://www.genealogyforum.com/gfaol/internet/albertaGW.htm

http://listingsca.com/Alberta/Society/Genealogy/

http://www.islandnet.com/~cghl/region.php?cat=Alberta

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~canab/ethnic.html

http://www.feefhs.org/

http://users.rootsweb.com/~canab/lookups.html#Alberta


Alberta Telephone Directory

Information available
http://www.alberta.com

http://www.mytelus.com/phonebook/display.do

http://alberta.ca/home/directory.cfm

Canadian 411 
(does not include Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan)

www.infospace.com
 

This site has over 10 million listings, including postal codes, full addresses as well as name of Province and phone numbers 

http://canada411.sympatico.ca

411 info:
www.infobel.com

http://www.canada411.ca/
 

http://www.canada411.sympatico.ca/ 

http://www.eu-info.com/inter/World.asp?Country=   
(Add a name of a Country you wish to research i.e. Britain, etc.)


Jewish Community Centres

1607  90th Avenue SW, Calgary
http://www.calgaryjcc.com/


http://www.abheritage.ca/albertans/articles/jews_5.html

Edmonton
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0006_0_05561.html

http://www.jewishedmonton.org/index.aspx?page=1

Vancouver
http://www.jccgv.com/

http://www.jfgv.com/index.aspx?page=1


Jewish Family Service Calgary

http://www.jfsc.org/

http://www.jewishfamilyservicecalgary.org/


Sibbald

Located in south eastern Alberta, there was a Agricultural colony known as the Montefiore Colony 
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0001_0_00683.html

http://www.littlesynagogue.ca/PhotoArchive.htm

Map to Sibbald Synagogue
http://maps.yahoo.com/map?q1=1607-90%20Ave.%20SW%20ca&mag=5&ard=1#mvt=m&lat=37.271881&lon=-119.270233&mag=5&zoom=14&q1=1607-90%20Ave.%20SW%20ca


British Columbia      

Vancouver - located in the western province of British Columbia, Vancouver has a Jewish community today of about 25,000.  The first Jewish settler was "Leaping" Louis Gold, arriving from Poland in 1872.  He ran a general store in Gastown, and received his leaping name because he was a small man who could leap high when the situation required it.  At the end of the 19th century, Jewish immigrants arrived from England, the U.S. and  Central Europe.  In 1916, the first synagogue was built and called the Orthodox Sons of Israel.

David Oppenheimer, a wealthy Jew, established Stanley Park.  One of the most popular Jewish personality stories is the one about David Marks, a Vancouver tailor and synagogue president, who invited a visiting performer playing the local vaudeville theater to a family Passover Seder.  Marks' daughter Sadie fell in love and married the performer, Benjamin Kubelsky of Chicago.  The couple is better known by their stage names: Jack Benny and Mary Livingston.

There are two Conservative synagogues (Beth Israel and Har El) one Reform (Temple Sholom) two Orthodox (Schara Tzedeck and Louis Brier) one Sephardic Orthodox (Beth Ha'Midrash) one Hasidic (Chabad-Lubavitch) two Traditional (Shaarey Tefilah and Burquest) and one Renewal (Or Shalom).  The city also boasts  a Jewish School and an excellent Jewish community center with a huge library, a fine art collection, a pool, gym and a kosher snack bar.  The center holds an annual Jewish Film Festival.

The Cloverdale Library, Genealogy Dept., has, on microfilm, passenger lists of ships arriving in Canadian ports from late 1890s into the 1920s.  You need to know the approximate year of arrival, then you can search the film ship by ship and name by name until you find the required information.  If you live outside the Cloverdale area, the charge is $2.00 for use of the viewing equipment.  Photocopies directly from the microfilm is 10 cents a copy.

For information about the Jewish Community, get a copy of the free bi-annual magazine Jewish Life.  Email: address is info@shalombc.org


British Columbia Archives

http://royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/bcarchives/

http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/index.htm 

http://www.bcarchives.bc.ca/bcarchives/default.aspx

http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/textual/governmt/vstats/v_events.htm 


Birth, Marriage and Death Indexes

For the B.C. Archives
http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca:9000/sn-1B064C6/gbsearch/Marriages

http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/textual/governmt/vstats/v_events.htm

http://globalgenealogy.com/globalgazette/gazfd/gazfd71b.htm


British Columbia Death Index

The British Columbia Archives' Vital Events Indexes page, which contains summary information on historical births, deaths and marriages that were submitted to District Registrars and registered by the Director of Vital Statistics.
http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/textual/governmt/vstats/v_events.htm

http://www.telusplanet.net/public/mtoll/bc.htm

http://search.ancestry.com/search/category.aspx?cat=34


Jewish Federation of Greater Vancouver

Phone 604 257 5100
http://www.jfgv.com/local_includes/downloads/13531.pdf

http://www.jewishcanada.org/page.aspx?ID=26959

http://www.jewishindependent.ca/archives/Mar04/archives04Mar05-01.html


Calgary

Calgary

Has a Jewish School.
http://www.jewishcalgary.org/index.aspx?page=1

http://www.ucalgary.ca/applied_history/tutor/calgary/jewish.html

http://www.glenbow.org/collections/search/findingAids/archhtm/jewish.cfm


Calgary Jewish Genealogy Society

Meets at Calgary Jewish Community Centre, 1607 90th Avenue, Calgary. 
Email: Florence Elman, President
haflo@shaw.ca
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgssa/

http://www.jewishcalgary.org/local_includes/downloads/27221.pdf

http://www.jewishgen.org/jgssa/resources.htm


 University of Calgary

Provides integrated media systems in support of teaching, research and public service roles of the University community
http://www.ucalgary.ca/UofC/departments/INFO/library/

http://people.ucalgary.ca/~elsegal/Shokel/Art_Index.html

http://www.religiousworlds.com/jewish.html

http://jewishhistory.huji.ac.il/Syllabi/syllabi.htm


Manitoba

Community History Books
These are books owned by Infoukes list members who are willing to do lookup for family names  

http://Communities.UkrainianGenealogyGroup-PEI.org/

http://globalgenealogy.com/countries/canada/manitoba/resources/index.htm

http://www.mcnallyrobinson.com/9781896150529/allan-levine/coming-age-history-jewish-people-manitoba

Jewishfoundation.org
This site offers stories of Jewish families and why they had settled in Winnipeg
Check the section entitled
"Book of Life".
http://www.jewishfoundation.org   

http://www.jewishfoundation.org/news.html

Manitoba Genealogical Societies
Has for sale transcripts of over 1400 cemeteries in the province and posted online
http://www.mbgenealogy.com/

http://www.mbgenealogy.com/index.php?page=cemetery-transcriptions

http://www.jhcwc.org/geninst.php

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/manitoba-mb/winnipeg.html

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~goudied/other_mb_resources.html

Manitoba GenWeb Volunteers Community History Books
Look ups
http://www.rootsweb.com/~canmb/lookups.htm

http://www.jewishfoundation.org/volunteers.html

http://jgs-montreal.org/

Manitoba GenWeb Query Site
Post your question here - there is no subscription required.  No mail unless someone has information for you (or perhaps thinks there is a family connection) 

http://www.westmanitoba.com/

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~canmb/volunteers.htm

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~canmb/cemeteries.htm

Subscribe to the RootsWeb Can-Manitoba Mailing List
Instructions at

http://www.rootsweb.com/~canmb/canmanitoba.htm

Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada

C116 - 123 Doncaster St.
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3N 2B2, Canada;
Phone: 204 477 7460; Fax: 204 477 7465 
http://www.jhcwc.org/jhswc.php

http://www.acjs-aejc.ca/journalindex.html

http://www.concentric.net/~lkessler/jwlinks.shtml

http://fcis.oise.utoronto.ca/~acjs

Historical Societies addresses in the US, Canada and Australia

http://www.daddezio.com/society/hill/SH-MT-NDX.html

http://www.amazon.com/Directory-Historical-Organizations-United-States/dp/0759100020

Manitoba Genealogical Society

Has available for purchase  a list of over 1,400  cemeteries in the province at: 
http://www.mbnet.mb.ca/~mgs/mgs_mis.html

http://www.mbgenealogy.com/

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/alberta-ab/index.html

http://www.jgstoronto.ca/ http://www.islandnet.com/~daveobee/cangenealogy/manitoba.html 

Manitoba General Links

Archives 
Immigration Records; Military and Organizations and various Societies.
http://www.islandnet.com/~jveinot/cghl/manitoba.html  

http://www.mhs.mb.ca/info/links.shtml

http://www.cyndislist.com/manitoba.htm

Manitoba - Jewish Genealogical Exploration Guide

http://www.concentric.net/~Lkessler/jgems.shtml

http://jewishgen.blogspot.com/

http://www.archives.gov/research/alic/reference/ethnic-heritage.html

Minnedosa

Minnedosa is a town in the southwestern part of the Canadian province of Manitoba. Situated 50 kilometers (32 mi) north of Brandon, Manitoba on the Little Saskatchewan River, the name means "flowing water" in Dakota language. The population of Minnedosa reported in the 2006 Statistics Canada Census was 2,474. The town is located in the Rural Municipality of Minto and bordered to the south by the
Rural Municipality of  OdanahPaula Abdul's mother's family was one of the two Jewish families.

Ukrainian Genealogy Group

http://ukrainiangenealogygroup-ncr.org/

http://ukrainiangenealogygroup-pei.org/

http://www.halgal.com/links.html


Winnipeg


Books  
               

"From Kamenets-Podolski to Winnipeg: The History of the Lechtziers, a Pioneering Canadian Family"
Authored by Dr. Reuven Lexier,  Lexier Editions 474 College St. #406, Toronto, ON M6G 1A4. This book will be of value to readers with an interest in Canadian Jewish communities, the role of faith in Canadian Jewish life, or genealogy relating to North Americans of Ukrainian or Russian-Jewish origins.  Genealogical information is given on more than 135 family members.
ISBN 0-9682293-0-1


Hirsch Colony Jewish Farmers Cooperative Society
Also The
Canadian Farmers Hay Exchange Ltd.
http://cap.estevan.sk.ca/community/history/ppp/

http://cap.estevan.sk.ca/cemetery.records/Hirsch/index.html

http://www.co.koochiching.mn.us/history/Hist03.htm

I. L. Peretz Folk Shul in Winnipeg
Contact Maxine Zabenskie, 423 Inkster Blvd., Winnipeg R2W 0K6 or Email:
peretzschoolreunion@hotmail.com 
http://www.lkessler.com/jwlinks.shtml

http://www.grayacademy.ca/about_history.html

http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/transactions/3/jewishschools.shtml

The Jewish Community of Winnipeg
Approximately 15,000 and growing as a result of Argentinean Jewish migration.

Stories of Jewish families and why they had come to Winnipeg
www.jewishfoundation.org

Winnipeg GenWeb
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mbwinnip/

Winnipeg Jewish Community Web Site
Offers links to other sites with related information:

www.jewishwinnipeg.org  

Winnipeg Jewish Information
http://www.concentric.net/~lkessler/jwlinks.shtml

Winnipeg Jewish School
has a Jewish School

Winnipeg Mailing List  
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mbwinnip/canmbwinnipeg.htm


Maritime Provinces

Jews have lived in Canada's Atlantic or Maritime Provinces -- Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland - since before the American Revolution. Many as retailers and peddlers.  There are about 3,000 Jews living n the Maritimes, where they work in the professions, business and the arts.  The largest number live in Halifax which has a Jewish population of 1,700. Myra Freeman was the first female lieutenant governor of Nova Scotia and the President of Dalhousie University is a Jewish man.

An excellent article by Elin Schoen Brockman appeared in Hadassah Magazine - October, 2004 issue.  Also good reading is "Cape Breton Lives" - a collection from Ronald Caplan's Cape Breton's Magazine. 

The Ward Chipman Papers
Ward Chipman the Elder (1754-1824), a Massachusetts lawyer, was also an army administrator in the State of New York between 1777 and 1783. In 1784, he settled in New Brunswick where he served as solicitor general until 1808. The Ward Chipman Papers contain muster rolls of Loyalists, and their families, who were members of demobilized regiments and who settled in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. This research tool provides access to nearly 19,000 references to Loyalist families.
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/ward-chipman/index-e.html


Cape Breton

There is an old Jewish cemetery in Cape Breton.
http://www.theajc.ns.ca/capebreton.php

http://www.thebethisrael.com/cemetery/index.html

http://www.jewishcapebreton.ca/

http://www.jewishcapebreton.ca/glacebay/kumahaym/recollections.html

http://reformjudaismmag.org/Articles/index.cfm?id=1241


Glace Bay

Sons of Israel  Wooden Synagogue
Located on Prince Street
Phone 902 849 8605. 
There are a few Jews still living here.

http://life.nationalpost.com/2010/08/02/closure-of-cape-breton%E2%80%99s-oldest-synagogue-marks-end-of-era/

http://www.cireport.ca/2010/07/cape-breton-synagogue-closing.html


Halifax      

                                                                

This is a city of about 390,000 and receives a lot of attention in Canada for its role as a port, a provincial capital and a college town.  It is also known for the part it played in the Titanic disaster. There are 121 graves in several of the cemeteries, but the one of most interest to those searching their Jewish roots are the graves of 10 whose names are not known, but were identified as being Jews from the sinking of the ship.

Atlantic Jewish Council
Telephone: 902 422 7491
Spring Garden Road
Halifax, Canada

www.theajc.ns.ca

http://www.pier21.ca/planningyourvisit/

Canadian Museum of Immigration
http://www.novascotia.com/en/home/thingstoseeanddo/novascotiaattractions/
listingdetails.aspx/canadianmuseumofimmigrationatpier/T1303
 

Cemetery
There is a Jewish Cemetery in Halifax (Baron de Hirsch Cemetery) and there are 10 identically marked headstones that bear the same date of April 15, 1912, the day the Titanic sunk.  Eight of the marked stones were Jews whose names are not known as the stones are marked only with numbers.
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nshalifa/Cemeteries.html

http://ourtree.org/GenWeb/link.asp?l=

http://www.jewishhalifax.com/cemetery/

Maritime Museum
http://museum.gov.ns.ca/mmanew/en/home/default.aspx

Pier 21 in Halifax
Became a major port of entry for Jewish refugees after WW II.

Synagogues
Beth Israel Synagogue

(The Baron de Hirsch Congregation) - on Oxford Street

http://www.jewishhalifax.com/

Shaar Shalom
A conservative synagogue  - on Oxford Street
http://theshaar.ca/

There is a story about the area published in the San Diego Jewish Journal, Dec. 2009 issue

New Brunswick
Has the only Jewish Museum in the Maritimes

20 Wellington Row in St. John;
Phone: 506 633 1833

http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/sjjhm/

http://www.nowogrodzki.com/genealogy/budarticle1.htm

http://www1.gnb.ca/0003/vrl-brv/000.asp

Prince Edward Island
Legislative history online
(more that a century of information is available)
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2013/02/14/pei-online-archives-legislature-584.html

St John
Congregation Sharrei Zedek
http://www.synagogues360.org/synagogues.php?ident=canada_003

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/new-brunswick-nb/saint-johns.html

http://sjnow.com/todo.htm

Sydney
Temple Sons of Israel
88 Mount Pleasant Street;
Phone: 902 564 9819 in the Whitney Pier section,  It is a conservative synagogue dating back to 1913 and is now the home of the Whitney Pier Historical Museum

http://lemac2.tripod.com/index-185.html

Wellington
A small town about six miles from Yarmouth.  There were part-time farmers and even a Hebrew teacher, but all had to supplement their meager earnings by peddling shmatas or whatever else they could find to sell.

http://www.county.wellington.on.ca/

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~onwellin/

Yarmouth
The synagogue building was originally a church.  The blue-painted building with a Star of David in its tower, still exists on William Street. 

In the late 1860s and early 1870s, enterprising Jewish peddlers from Europe passed through this town plying their wares.  Little is known about them except that they were always looking for a Jewish home where they could have a good Shabbes dinner.  There was at least one resident Jewish couple in Yarmouth: Ketty and Louis Lieberman.  Later, another Jewish settle arrived by name of Joseph Whitehouse who opened a clothing store which was closed on Saturdays but reopened on Saturday night.

One famous resident was Louis B. Mayer, who arrived here and became a junk peddler, but didn't succeed and went to the US where he eventually founded Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios.

Around 1904, the first Jewish cemetery was established.

Almost all of the Jews of Yarmouth have immigrated to the US and Israel or to larger Canadian cities.  There may be less than 10 still living here in 2009. An excellent article written by Judith Fein with photos by Paul Ross can be found in the December 2009 issue of Hadassah Magazine.

http://yarmouthcountymuseum.ednet.ns.ca/historigram_1.html

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/990087/jewish/The-Yiddles-of-Nova-Scotia-and-the-Titanic.htm


Montreal
 

Traces of the Past book cover

To document the movement and development of Montreal’s Jewish community from the 1880s until 1945, much like a detective, Sara Ferdman Tauben has pored over historic city maps and directories, sepia-coloured photos, brittle newspaper articles and long forgotten anniversary publications to track the locations of Montreal’s early synagogues. Her quest results in a fascinating story that describes and defines the social, religious, and economic aspects of a distinct group of people through the architectural traces of its culture.
http://tracesofthepast.ca/

The city has a Jewish population of about 100,000 of which most are Ashkenazi, but there is a large group of French-speaking Sephardic Moroccan Jews now living in the city. Between Montreal and Toronto, there are 12 Jewish schools and several Yeshivas.  About 60 percent of the Jewish children in Montreal attend Jewish primary schools and 30 percent are in Jewish high schools.  The McGill University in Montreal offers programs in Jewish studies and a course in learning Yiddish.  My wife's late first cousin, Zave Ettinger, was quite involved with the school program. In 2013, for the first time in a century, Montreal has a Jewish Mayor who was elected by city councilors  - Michael Applebaum.  Many Montreal Jews fled to Toronto during the "Big Move" in the late 1960s when most of Canada's banks sent convoys to Toronto to get away from the Parti Quebecois and reopened their headquarters in Toronto.  Their new areas of settlement were in the area north of Eglington Avenue, the Don Valley and right in the middle of the city around Yonge Street
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Quebec.html

http://www.jewishinmontreal.com/

http://www.ymywha.com/

http://www.policyarchive.org/handle/10207/bitstreams/18356.pdf


Books  
             

Rebecca Margolis, a German born author who lives in Montreal, tells the story of a Jewish center less major than New York.
http://blogs.forward.com/the-arty-semite/157313/yiddish-montreal-history-wins-book-award/


Cemeteries

Baron De Hirsch Cemetery 
Located on Savane Street. There are 20,000 records and images, about a quarter of the entire cemetery on-line - a commercial site offers an on-line database
www.jewishdata.com

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_de_Hirsch_Cemetery_%28Montreal%29

http://jgs-montreal.org/burials.html

Paperman's Funeral Home
Jewish funeral home in Montreal
http://www.paperman.com/


Cote-des-Neiges-Notre-Dame-de-Grace

A densely Jewish area of Montreal

Cummings House

The site of the Jewish Public Library and the Holocaust Memorial Center 
http://www.jewishpubliclibrary.com

http://www.cummingscentre.org/


JGS of Montreal

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal serves a city with one of the oldest Jewish communities in North America. The first Jewish settlers arrived in 1760 and the first synagogue (in Canada), the Shearith Israel, was founded in 1768. Today, Montreal has a thriving Jewish community of over 100,000. It is in honour of these forebears and those who came after that we introduce our society and research in Montreal and Quebec to the Jewish genealogical community around the world.
www.gtrdata.com/jgs-montreal/

http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com/2009/11/montreal-ottawas-jewish-history-nov-23.html


The Montréal Gazette

Electronic edition
http://www.canada.com/montreal/montrealgazette/news/story.html

http://www.montrealgazette.com/


Montreal Jewish Magazine

http://www.montrealjewishmagazine.com/syncem.html


Research

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal has indexed over 70,000 Jewish birth, marriage and death records for Montreal and Quebec. In addition, there are over 50,000 Montreal burial records on JewishGen's JOWBR, and the Society's web site has a number of research guides for Montreal and Quebec Jewish research.
http://jgs-montreal.org


Synagogues

Beth Tikva Synagogue
Has a membership of over 800 families and celebrated its 36th anniversary in 2001. Rabbi Mordecai Zeitz, a former New Yorker, is the Rabbi.
http://www.bethtikvah.qc.ca/

Portuguese Congregation
Where on the High Holidays you can hear the sounds of five separate services in five different languages.
http://www.spanishportuguese-mtl.org/

Shaarey Israel
The first synagogue in Montreal built in 1768.
http://jgs-montreal.org/burials.html


Saidye Bronfman Community Center

Has an active Yiddish theater.
http://www.arts.on.ca/Page471.aspx


Ontario

Cemetery Locations in Ontario
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/northamerica/ontario.html

http://www.wightman.ca/~dkaufman/

http://www.afhs.ab.ca/registry/regon_death.shtml

http://www.jgstoronto.ca/content/view/52/70/

http://www.jgstoronto.ca/content/view/54/72/

Cemetery Finding Aid
A database of over two million Ontario cemetery listings.
http://www.islandnet.com/ocfa/homepage.html

http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2009-02/msg00344.html

http://genealogy.about.com/od/cemeteries_online/Cemeteries_Online_Cemetery
_Transcriptions_Tombstone_Photos.htm
 

http://www.telusplanet.net/public/mtoll/locate2.htm

Death Certificate in Ontario (Ordering)
To order a death certificate
http://www.cbs.gov.on.ca/mcbs/english/deaths.htm

click on the link to download the form - you can print it out and mail it in.

https://www.orgforms.gov.on.ca/eForms/start.do?lang=en

Jewish Genealogy Society Hamilton
Hazel Boon is the President
 president@jgsh.org  JGS - Hamilton & Area - jgsh@cogeco.ca
www.jgsh.org 


Ottawa

Books  
             

"A checklist of registers of Protestant & Jewish congregations in Quebec"
Author Neil Broadhurst  


Jewish Genealogy Society of Ottawa (Ontario)

Jewish Genealogy Society of Ottawa
Congregation Machzikie Hadas
2310 Virginia Dr., Ottawa, ON, K1H 6S2
Telephone: (613) 723-5114
http://www.jgso.org/JGSOConstitution.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/jgssa/Societies.html


Research
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Montreal
has indexed over 70,000 Jewish birth, marriage and death records for Montreal and Quebec. In addition, there are over 50,000 Montreal burial records on JewishGen's JOWBR, and the Society's web site has a number of research guides for Montreal and Quebec Jewish research.

http://jgs-montreal.org


Ottawa City Directory 1909 

Cover of: Ottawa city directory -- by

https://archive.org/details/ottawadirec190900midiuoft

https://openlibrary.org/books/OL14032821M/Ottawa_city_directory_--


Ottawa Jewish Historical Society Archives

151 Chapel Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 7Y2
(613) 798-4696 Ext. 260
http://www.ojhs.ca/

http://www.jewishottawa.org/page.aspx?id=193507

http://www.ojhs.ca/about.html

Historical Societies addresses in the US, Canada and Australia
http://www.daddezio.com/society/hill/SH-MT-NDX.html


Ottawa Jewish Schools

http://www.jewishottawa.org/page.aspx?id=147645

http://www.omjs.ca/

http://www.hillelacademy.ca/


Quebec

Quebec City

Beth Israel Ohev Sholom Synagogue  
1251 Place de Mericie
Quebec City, Quebec
Canada

Tel:  418   688-3277
The only synagogue in the city of about 100 Jewish souls. The Rabbi is Aaron Sultan.  Joseph Gabay is president of the Canadian Jewish Congress' Quebec region. There is also a Jewish cemetery.
http://www.jewishinmontreal.com/Congregation-Beth-Israel-Ohev-Sholem.html

Quebec Jewish Cemetery online
http://jewishgraveyardrabbit.blogspot.com/2009/01/canada-quebec-jewish-cemetery-online.html

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vtcstjoh/cemetery/quebec.htm

Cemetery
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Royal_Cemetery

Jewish Vital Records Research
http://jgs-montreal.org/quebec-research.html

http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2009-01/msg00275.html


Saskatchewan

 

Six Jewish colonies were established in Saskatchewan by Baron Maurice and Baroness Clara de Hirsch, but later were abandoned, but their cemeteries remain.

Lipton


"Grave-houses What prompted the building of the curious, gabled burial sites?"
http://www.hadassahmagazine.org/site/apps/nlnet/content.aspx?c=twI6LmN7IzF&b=5698175&ct=8806623

Hadassah Magazine, in the October/November 2010 issue, published "Little Houses on the Prairie" authored by Isa Millman.  It tells the story of the gift that became "Prairie Kaddish") published by Coteau Books, which is a book of history of the area, told mostly through poetry.  It is a story, from a genealogical viewpoint of a chapter of hardships that faced the Eastern European Jews who came to this harsh land; lived here and died here.  As Isa states in his article, "Between 1880 and World War I, one in three Jews left Eastern Europe to escape persecution." Baron Maurice and Baroness Clara de Hirsch were instrumental in training these Jews to become farmers, but none succeeded in Lipton so they moved on to cities of Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary and Edmonton.

Lipton's Jewish Cemetery leaves a mark for those Jews to impress on us, the living, the hardships that they had to endure, so we can live the relatively easy life today.  The cemetery is located "somewhere" beyond Lipton, in the middle of a field, in the middle of nowhere.  There is an 'unlocked' shed that serves as the cemetery's office and unofficial museum, complete with the original iron bath for washing the dead, a litter for carrying them and a guestbook for visitors to sign.  Russian and Romanian Jews arrived in Lipton circa 1901.  According to the notes, settlers had each bough 160 acres, a quarter section, for $10, with the stipulation that the land was theirs to keep if they lived on it a minimum of 6 months a year over 3 years and broke 30 acres.  Most had no experience of farming and the prairie grasses had never been plowed.

A fragment in a loose-leaf binder, found in the office, described the grave-houses as a means "to preserve loved ones from the ravages of wild animals and spirits."  The families, in order to bury the loved one, would light fires with straw to heat the ground enough to dig a shallow grave; the houses built on top were, in fact, to protect the bodies.
http://www.hadassahmagazine.org/site/apps/nlnet/content.aspx?c=twI6LmN7IzF&b=5698175&ct=8806623

Saskatchewan Archives Board
Murray Building,
University of Saskatchewan,
3 Campus Drive, Saskatoon SK S7N 5A4  
Telephone: 306 933 5832   
Email: :
info.saskatoon@archives.gov.sk.ca 

http://www.saskarchives.com/

Saskatchewan Genealogical Society
Provide assistance to anyone researching their heritage in Saskatchewan and  promotes,
encourages and foster the study of genealogical and original research in the Province of
Saskatchewan.

http://www.saskgenealogy.com/

http://saskgenealogy.blogspot.com/

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cansk/Saskatchewan/ethnic/jewish-saskatchewan.html

http://www.afhs.ab.ca/registry/regsk_death.html

http://www.carswells.com/gene/e21104.htm

Saskatchewan Jewish Communities
Genealogical Institute of the Jewish Heritage Centre of Western Canada.
Ms. Irma Penn is the archivist heritage@jhcwc.org
http://www.jhcwc.org/geninst.htm

http://www.niedermayer.ca/~ral/history/

http://esask.uregina.ca/entry/jewish_community_saskatoon.html

http://esask.uregina.ca/entry/agudas_israel_synagogue__jewish_community_centre.html

http://www.haruth.com/JewsCanada.html

Saskatchewan Mailing List
Sponsored by RootsWeb

http://lists.rootsweb.com/index/intl/CAN/CAN-SASKATCHEWAN.html


Toronto

Toronto's Jewish community is about 200,000 -- the largest Jewish population in Canada. Rosalie Silberman Abella became Canada's first female Jewish Supreme Court justice; she had been the country's youngest judge when she was first appointed in 1976. The main Jewish areas are Sunnyside and lower Spadina.

Archives   

The Ontario Archives
Will loan these microfilms to libraries via interlibrary loan.  Further information can be found at 
http://www.gov.on.ca

Birth records on microfilm 1869-1902
Marriage records on microfilm 1873 - 1917
Death records on microfilm 1869 to 1927

http://www.toronto.ca/faq/birthdeathmarriage.htm

http://www.torontopubliclibrary.ca/search.jsp?N=37868+4293015080&Ns=p_title_sort&Nso=0

It is difficult to get more recent records from Canada; their privacy laws are generally more restrictive than those of the US.  The Archives of Ontario has the records for marriages within the past 80 years.  Earlier records are at the Canada National Archives, and my be available through the Mormon Library.  The Archives of Ontario conscientiously transfers records each year, to not keep records older than 80 years.

To get a marriage certificate from the Archives of Ontario, you must be: for bride or groom parent or child of the bride or groom closest next-of-kin, executor, estate trustee, of the bride or groom, and one of them is deceased.  A copy of the marriage certificate is $15.00 Canadian.

To get the long form of the application, you must be the bride or groom, closest next-of-kin, executor, or estate trustee, of the bride or groom and one of them is deceased.  A copy of the long form is $22.00 Canadian.

For general information about obtaining these more recent birth, marriage and death records,

The form can be downloaded - Please note that this is a link to a PDF file; you'll need to have an adobe Acrobat Reader

(Available from Adobe for free) installed on your system to download the forms. 
From a posting by Hilary Henkin on JewishGen
www.Adobe.com
 

http://www.ccr.gov.on.ca:80/mccr/english/2542_3fe.htm


Books  
             

"Jews in Toronto"
Authored by Gerald Tulchinsky.


Aliza Libman, who grew up in Toronto, wrote an article about the city in the August/September 2009 issue of Hadassah Magazine.
http://www.hadassah.org/default2.asp

http://www.jewishtoronto.com/index.aspx?page=1

http://www.jewishtoronto.com/page.aspx?ID=160838

http://www.jewishinto.com/


About 30,000 Israelis live in Canada with most of them living in Toronto.


Cemeteries

Agudas Achim Cemetery
Neil Perry is the current President.  Lilian Schorr placed a photo of a tombstone of a great aunt on JewishGen and mentioned that the cemetery is in disrepair with many fallen headstones.  For further information about her visit to this cemetery, contact Lilian
lilianschorr@elsitio.net 
http://www.multiculturalcanada.ca/node/109279/full

http://www.agudasma.org/asktherabbi.shtml

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/tree/CemList.htm

Jones Avenue Cemetery
http://ca.epodunk.com/cgi-bin/genInfo.php?locIndex=2009480

Roselawn Cemetery
Jewish cemetery in Toronto
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lida-district/lida-city/beth-lida-list05.htm

http://boards.msn.ancestry.com/topics.cemetery.canada.ontario/596.3/mb.ashx


Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto)
Garry Stein, President
P.O. Box 446, Station "A"
Toronto, ON, M2N 5T1, Canada
Phone & Fax: (905) 882-2259
Email: :
info@jgstoronto.ca
http://www.jgstoronto.ca/


Jewish Toronto
http://www.jewishtoronto.net/content_display.html?ArticleID=118859


The Junction
Around the turn of the 20th century, East European Jews settled in this west-end neighborhood.
http://www.torontolife.com/guide/real-estate/west/junction-area/

http://www.wtjhs.ca/publications.htm


Kensington Market
Once a center of Jewish life, still has large old shuls in the area.

http://www.kensington-market.ca/Default.asp?id=10&l=1

http://www.jewishtorontoonline.net/home.do?ch=st_downtown

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kensington_Market


Synagogues

Anshei Minsk
http://www.theminsk.com/


Beth Avraham Yoseph of Toronto
www.bayt.org

Beth Tzedec Congregation
www.beth-tzedec.org

Congregation Knesseth Israel
was built in 1912

www.junctionshul.org

Holy Blossom Temple
An orthodox synagogue
http://www.holyblossom.org   

Kiever Shul
An orthodox synagogue in the heart of the Kensington Market area
http://www.kievershul.com   


Telephone Directory

As recently as the 1960's Toronto Phone Directory included the occupation of the person listed.
http://torontoseeker.com/torontophonedirectory.htm

TUGG
Toronto Ukrainian Genealogy Group

http://www.torugg.org/

more to come ...


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