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    Galicia   (See also Bukovina page)

c

 

 

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At different times, Galicia has been part of the Austrian and Austro-Hungarian Empires, Poland and Ukraine. Map located at
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~polwgw/polandgen.html 

(Note: You may find additional information and sources (Galicia, at various times was a part of one of these three countries) in my AustrianPoland and Ukrainian web pages - Click on any one of these hyperlinks)

http://mlodek.republika.pl/geografia.htm 

Galizien is the German/Austrian name for Galicia. Galizien was a Crown land (Kronlander) of Austria prior to WW I. Events after WW I: A West Ukrainian People's Republic (WUPR) was declared on November 1, 1918. In January 1919, the WUPR gained unity with the Ukrainian National Republic which had been restored in Kyiv/Kiev after the fall of the Hetmanate government in December 1918. Then conflicting local and international interests and invasions by Poles, Bolsheviks, White Russians, even the French in Odessa region, various peasant revolts, etc. -- general civil war -- destabilized the entire region. The Poles which had the support from the Western Powers gained the upper hand. This information attributed to Laurence Krupnick in the Galicia Topica of October 9, 2001

Halychyna is the Ukrainian name and Halychyna is the Polish name for this region. The ancient capital city, Galych, is the source of the root name. First historical mention of Galicia dates to 898 AD.

The name of Galicja is most commonly associated with the Austro-Hungarian partition of Poland in 1772, the province was made up of Wolyn and Podole. During 1st Partition in 1772. Both towns, Zurawno and Rozniatow are closely associated with town Stryj but as Austria had subdivided Galicia into circles and districts, towns have been relocated to the different administration and judicial districts.

In the year after the 1st Partition in 1773, Austria has subdivided all Galicia Crown Land into 6 administrative Circles (Kreis in German or Okreg in Polish). Circles Wieliczka and Pilzno in Western Galicia and Circles Belz, Halycz, Lwów and Sambor in Eastern Galicia. Circle Halych included Stryj, Rozniatow and Zurawno.

In 1784, 18 smaller Circles had replaced old 6, and Stryj and Stanislawow became administration centers. Zurawno was placed under the Stanislawow circle and Rozniatow under the Stryj Circle. This placement did not change during next three Circles reshuffling in 1787, 1815 and 1867.

In 1867, Austria introduced new administration divisions known as Districts (Kreisdistrikten in German, Powiat or Okreg in Polish).

This time and for the next five administration changes, Rozniatow was placed under the Dolina and Zurawno under the Zydaczow Administration Districts.

At the same time both towns were the seats of the judicial districts courts which were under the jurisdiction of the judicial circuit court in Stryj 2. Where do Rozniatow and Zurawno fit into your previous discussion of East and West Galicia? East. From a posting by Alexander Sharon

More information can be found at
http://www.kresy.co.uk/galicja.html 

Galicia is a region lying along the north side of the Carpathian Mountains, consisting of the pre-1939 Polish provinces of Krakow, L'viv, Ternopol and Stanislawow, which between the years 1772 and 1918, formed a crown land of the Austrian Empire.

Austria lost to Russia nearly all lands acquired in 1795: It should be noted again, that there were territorial readjustment made during 1815 Vienna Congress when Austria has lost to the victorious Russia Zamosc region, parts of Wolyn and Podolia and nearly all lands acquired in 1795 with exception of the City of Krakow.

Nevertheless, those 20 years when Austria ruled over the parts of Podolia, Wolynia, Lublin, Radom, and Prussia ruled over Warsaw, Bialystok, Lomza and Suwalki had a significant influence on the Jewish people.

During the 1930s, keep in mind in your research, that all of western Ukraine was either located in Poland and/or Czechoslovakia. Before WW I, Galicia was part of Austria and several partitions occurred in the 1700s and 1800s.

After WW II, western Galicia became a part of Poland and Eastern Galicia became a part of Ukraine. The southern boundary follows the Carpathians; on the west is the Polish province of Katowice: on the east by Ukraine and on the southeast by Romania. On the north, it is bounded by both Kielce and Lublin provinces. The western border of the historic Galicia lays along the towns of Chelm (Kholm), Jaroslaw (Yaroslav) and Przemysl (Peremyshl) in southeast Poland. The western part of the Austrian Kingdom of Galicia and the city of Krakow (Cracow) were artificially incorporated into Galicia by the Austrians in 1772.

Today, Galicia is divided between southern Poland and western Ukraine. Some of the larger cities and towns in this region include:

Krakow (Cracow), Poland; Przemysl (Pshemishl), Poland; Tarnow, Poland; Brody (Brod, Prode), Ukraine; Drogobych (Drohobycz), Ukraine; Kolomyya (Kolomea), Ukraine; Ivano-Frankivsk (Stanislawow), Ukraine; L'viv (Lwów, Lemberg, Leopol), Ukraine; Ternipol (Tarnopol), Ukraine

Galicia, which since the late 1700s, was once referred to as Cherevna and was identified as being between Przemysl and L'viv as Grody Czerwienskie (Red Towns). The western part (west of the San river) traditionally called Malopolska, i.e. Little Poland (as opposed to Greater Poland around Poznan). The eastern part of Galicia was also called Ruthenia and originally inhabited by Ruthenians (
now split into Ukrainians and Byelorussians). (A historical description, written by Alexander Sharon, about Galicia can be reviewed at the Gesher Galicia SIG Archive of January 2000)
galicia@lyris.jewishgen.org  More details can also be found at
http://www.polishroots.com/genpoland/gal.htm 

After the first division of Poland in 1772, Empress Maria Theresa named her new province the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodmeria. The Galician area became a part of the Austro-Hungarian crown lands until the end of World War I. The province was made up of Wolyn and Podole. The Carpathian Mountains are a natural boundary at the Hungarian border. Look for information also in the Hungarian Index, Banat, Croatia and Siebenburgen.

According to a translation by William 'Fred' Hoffman of the Slownik Geograficzny: Galicia
http://www.polishroots.com   

Galicia was bordered by Silesia to the west, by Russia, the Kingdom of Poland, Volhynia and Podolia to the north/northeast and by Bukowina and Hungary to the south/southeast. Mostly Poles inhabited West Galicia while Ruthenians inhabited East Galicia, the San river being the dividing line between east and west. You can find this and tons of other information to help you in your research at
http://www.polishroots.com

When WW I was over, Galicia really split into two parts. The western part became a part of southeastern Poland, sometimes called Malopolska (Little Poland) which Kleinpolen translates to the same thing i.e. Little Poland. The eastern part of Galicia became what is in today's world, Ukraine.

There are a great deal of interesting links available at the PolishRoots™ web site including Austrian Military Recruitment in Galicia; Cemetery of the Defenders of Lwów; Galician Federal Representatives; Galician Provincial Representatives; Galician Vital Records; The Martyrs of Zloczow which includes a list of people detained during the tumultuous times at the end of WW I

http://www.polishroots.com/database.htm

“Following the Soviet seizure of eastern Poland in September 1939, Polish Galicia, comprising nearly 62,160 sq km (24,000 sq mi), was incorporated into the Ukrainian SSR. When the Germans invaded Ukraine in 1941 during World War II (1939-45), Ukrainian nationalists hoped that an autonomous or independent Ukrainian republic would be set up under German protection. Much to their disappointment, the Germans not only divided Russian Ukraine and West Ukraine (Galicia) but came as hostile conquerors. Ukraine was retaken by the USSR in 1944. In the same year parts of Bessarabia and northern Bukovina were added to it, and the Ruthenian region of Czechoslovakia was added in 1945.

The Ukrainian SSR became a charter member of the United Nations in 1945. The Crimean region in Russia was added to Ukraine in 1954. Communism in the USSR collapsed in 1991. At the end of 1991, the USSR ceased to exist, and Ukraine became an independent republic.”
http://grossmanproject.net/ukraine.htm 

European Galicia
Galicia Genealogy in General
http://emol.org/zucker/genealogy/galiciaeurope.html 

The Galician Index Program
Incorporates 74 Administrative Towns from the eastern part of Galicia -- 71 are now in Ukraine and 3 are in Poland. Of these 74 towns, 50 are listed with an Indexing Priority Number. Of these 50 towns, 34 have had their records indexed and 2 are partially indexed. Check the status of your town
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html

You can find an alphabetical listing of Galician towns with their Polish names on the excellent "Galician Town Locator" on the PolishRoots web site. This information was compiled from the 1900 census conducted by the Austro-Hungarian empire of Roman Catholic, Greek Catholic, and Jewish records. This database indicates where the records were registered, however, it only provides limited information about which records still exist.

The links on the Polish Roots, RTR and JRI-Poland websites do not appear to be working, but an archived version of the page can be found here:
http://web.archive.org/web/20080322000043/

http://www.polishroots.org/asp/findTown.asp 


From these Polish names, using JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker on their "Jewish Communities Database" you can discover their present-day names, whether Polish or Ukrainian, as well as their Yiddish and historical names. As an example, note JewishGen's listings for the town of Grzymalowe, today known as Hrymayliv: Grimaylov [Russian], Grzymalow [Polish], Rimalov [Yiddish], Hrymayliv [Ukrainian], Hrymajiliv, Hrymalliv, Gzhimaluv, Grzhymalov, Grzhimalov, Grimalov. Knowing all these variants is essential to genealogical research. From a posting by Pamela Weisberger
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp 

Lists of the 5600 towns in the Jewish Communities Database
by the governmental provinces in three periods ...pre WWI, between the wars, after WWII.
http://www.jewishgen.org/communities/trees/ 

Specific Community Photos
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Galicia Jewish Museum
Located in Krakow. Web site is in English
http://www.galiciajewishmuseum.org/en/index.html

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_KIellwHLsm4/TRk60_67CEI/AAAAAAAAQXk/
820wJeg52Cc/s1600/Krakow_Poland_Galicia_Museum.jpg
  

Most of the information placed on all of my web pages were taken from various forum messages that I have felt might be of value to a Jewish genealogist. Almost nothing is my opinion, (I am not that smart), but I believe, that when someone appears to offer more knowledge that can appear to add value, than I won't hesitate to add it to my pages until the information is either proven wrong or corrected.

Such is the case of the following information Email: ed to me by Frederick Kobylarz.


"Ted, "While I haven't read everything as of yet, you certainly have put a massive work together. I had been trying to put together a work on Galicia but have been unable to complete it just yet. Most of this work was in its initial phases several years ago, but I was sidetracked doing family work amongst other things. I have some comments for your review and may want to consider these when you try to
complete this section.

I have looked into the history of Galicia and find many terms on the web are just not totally correct... [revisionist history]. The most difficult aspect of this is that phrases being used serve no truth. As an example, I have seen the that Galicia "a term invented by the Austrians for their region they annexed at the first partition" etc
.

The following is what I have found to date which appears to be the most accurate.

1.Galicia, maps from around 1210 show Galicia. A small region that would lie in today's
   Ukraine.

2. Here are some massaged messages that I received regarding Galicia:

The full name of the Crown land was "Galizien und Lodomerien" in German, or "Galicia et Lodmeria" in the Latinized form. The name was derived from two ancient duchies, Halychyna and Volhynia, which served as buffer states between the southeastern Polish frontier and the Kievan State, until their absorption by Poland in the 14th century.

Lodomeria: The Latin name of Volodymyr-Volynskyi principality, as in "Regnum Galiciae et Lodomeriae." It appeared in Andrew II of Hungary's title, "Galiciae Lodomeriaeque rex," starting in 1206 and in the title of the Austrian emperors after Austria annexed Galicia (Galizien) in 1772. In Maria Theresa's manifesto of 18 September 1772, the annexation of Galicia was justified on the basis that Lodomeria
was a former possession of Hungary.

At the First Partition of Poland (1772) Austria in agreement with Prussia and Russia annexed the area of southern Poland. Austria did not invent the name of Galicia, it was in existence and can be found in maps dating back to 1210. Queen Maria Theresa "simply" applied part of her "title" to this region.


Though I have never seen it explicitly, my feeling is that this was done in keeping with the other two conspirators to eliminate the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and to de-Polonize the peoples, as the capital of Galicia was designated Lemberg [not Lwów].

An interesting article "Security in Central and Eastern Europe: A View From Warsaw"

http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usawc/Parameters/96winter/pieciuk.htm

Do a search for "three black eagles" in the article. Also, I have a map of Galicia that allude to the differences of place names in particular West Galicia. See:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~koby/westgalicia.jpg

Fred"


Prior to WW 1, the churches (Roman Catholic and Evangelical) and the head Rabbi of the Jewish Community, were given the responsibility for maintaining vital statistics for Austria. That part of the Ukraine that was in the Russian Empire, the churches also maintained vital statistics for the country as did the Chief Rabbi.

Galician emigrants usually departed from Galicia via England and would have most likely have taken a train to one of the two large German ports, Bremen or Hamburg. Here they would have gone to England, most likely from the ports of Liverpool or Southampton, and boarded a British steamship for passage to North America. The most likely routes, from 1900 to 1910 would have been Hamburg direct to a US port; Hamburg indirectly through Grimsby/Hull, England and/or rail to Liverpool or an ocean liner from Liverpool to a US Port. The 'indirect' route was both cheaper and faster, and popular. Other ports of emigration may have been Bremen, Antwerp or Amsterdam.

"Many went to England because the cost of passage to North America on a British ship was less expensive than on a German ship (North German Lloyd or Hamburg American lines)."

"The emigrants would have either purchased all of their tickets from ticketing agents in Galicia (such as in L'viv) or tickets would have been purchased in North America by their relatives or friends who were already there".

Jewish Wedding Dances in the Carpathian area
(Stanislav, Yasen, Mitvina, Delyatin and Pereginsky); Kaperush (a dance where everyone has to imitate exactly what the leader does) Other dances emanating from this area also include Mitsve-Tants, Broyges-Tants, slow volokh, sirba, kolomeyka "Kabinya Marisya", Yiddishe Troika and Hutsulka. Wedding songs include "Shrayt shoyn 'Mazel Tov', "Ot Azoy Makht Men Khasene Kinder" and "Chipkelakh mit Fasolyes".

Major events in the Galician history can be found itemized at this wonderful site
http://www.kresy.co.uk/galicja.html

Halych
Old capital of Galicia
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm



Books
  
             


Yizkor Books

There are Yizkor Books available for Galician Jewish Celebrities by Regions at http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html 

Further information, along with a detailed description about 'Yizkor Books' can be found at my Book page See also my link to amazon.com by clicking here >
Books


"Accessible Vital Records For Jews, Germans, Ukrainians and Poles in Galicia, Volhynia, Lithuania and Latvia- A Second Zabuzanski Collection"
Available at the downtown branch of the Vancouver Public Library. Other Libraries may also have a copy. Brian Lenius is Chairperson and Editor of East European Genealogist. Or Email: eegsociety.co
m
www.eegsociety.org


"Austrian-Jewish Life Stories From the Time of the Hapsburg Monarchy"
(Als haetten wir dazugehoert: Oesterreichisch-Juedische Lebensgeschichten aus der Habsburgemonarchie) Authored by Professor Albert Lichtblau and published by Boehlau-Verlag in Vienna in German.


"A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames From Galicia
Authored by Alexander Beider. Information about some 25,000 different surnames used by Jews in Galicia.


"Eastern European Genealogist"
Published by the East European Genealogical Society,
PO Box 2536, Winnipeg, MB
Canada R3C 4A7 - Pho
ne: 204 989 3292

http://www.eegsociety.org/ 

http://www.feefhs.org/


"Encyclopedia of Hahamei Galitzia"
Authored by Meir Wunder


"Encyclopedia Me'orei Galicia"
Authored by R" Meir Wunder


"Finding Your Jewish Roots In Galicia"
Authored by Suzan F. Wynne and published by Avotaynu. Possibly available in genealogically oriented libraries or through inter-library loan and from Avotaynu. Galician town listings start at page 132, including the district and sub district in which they are located. Many of the names are Polish in origin, but some are German.

http://www.avotaynu.com/galicia.htm


"Galician"
A quarterly Galician genealogical magazine

http://www.feefhs.org/surname/frg-ggm.html 

My notes indicates that in the April 2, 1996 issue, there appeared an article on a census conducted on 12/31/1900 in Gorlice, Poland. Since there are no known Jewish Vital Records for this time period currently available for Gorlice, this information may prove to be of value to those searching the Gorlice area.

Galicia, Editorial Offices
PO Box 312, PL-50-950
Wroclaw 2, Poland.
FEEFHS Representative: Edward Tadeusz Wojtakowski at the above address.
Phone and Fax: + 48 (71) 61 32 16


"Galizien - Eine Reise Durch die verschwundene Welt Ostgaliziens und der Bukowina"
Published by "insel Taschenbuch"
ISBN 3-458-34447=0


"Gazetteer of the Former Galicia and Bukowina"
Compiled by Felix Gundacher and published in Vienna, Austria in 1998 by the Institut fur Histroische Familienforschung (Institute for Historical Family Research) in both German and English. Listings of towns and districts of both Galicia and Bukowina, and also notes of those towns having a formally recognized "Jewish Community" under the Austrians, as well as those with Christian parishes of the primary denominations i.e. Roman Catholic, Orthodox and several others. The names of town included are the ones used by Austria in the 1870s.
directly from this web site
http://www.netway.at/ihff/index.htm/ 


"Geographic Dictionary of The Polish Kingdom and Other Slavic Countries"
(Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego i Innych Krajow Slowianskich)
Edited by Bronislaw Chlebowski in Warszawa in 1892


"Gorodenka Memorial Book"
http://shangrila.cs.ucdavis.edu:1234/heckman/gorodenka/membook.html


"The Jews of Galicia, 1839"
Authored by Suzan Wynne, the book is available in PDF format as an email attachment, in CD format and hard cover bound with a spiral binding. Costs will be involved with all 3 options.  The book covers the authors' travels to many places outside Galicia. The advantage to the booklet produced by Gesher Galicia in 1997 was that it was created as an index to the places mentioned, along with an introduction and other aids to the chapter on Galicia. Check the Gesher Galicia SIG discussion group for ordering/payment information. Please send questions and requests directly to Suzan
rwynne@erols.com


"Meorei Galicia: Encyclopedia Lekhakhmei Galicia"
(Encyclopedia of Galicia Sages) - authored by Rabbi Meir Wunder and reviewed by Chaim Freedman. This five-volume work is quite extensive and reliable sources of rabbinical genealogy written in the twentieth century. The article may be accessed from the "What's New" section of the Rav-SIG home page

http://www.jewishgen.org/Rabbinic 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Rabbinic/journal/mgalicia.htm 

http://www.jewishgen.org/rabbinic/databases/mgalicia.htm 


"Rediscovering Traces of Memory: The Jewish Heritage of Polish Galicia"
Photos by Chris Schwarz, text by Jonathan Webber and published by Littman Library of Jewish Civilization and Indiana University


"Sefer Stryj" (Book of Stryj)
Edited by N. Kudish of Tel Aviv who was a former resident of Stryj, and published in Israel in 1962.


"Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego"
An excellent classical Polish gazetteer available at the New York Public Research Library 42nd St. and 5th Ave. New York - hard copy and on several rolls of microfilms at the Family History Center (FHC) in New York City. Other FHCs should either have the microfilm or will order it for you.


"Treasures of Jewish Galicia"
From the Museum of Ethnography and Crafts in L'viv, Ukraine. A catalog of the exhibit at Beth Ha'tefutsorth in 1994-5 - edited by Sarah Harel Hoshen. Published in soft cover in 1996.


 

General
Galician Genealogy
Information

 

http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/photo817906.htm

An excellent site to find information about most European countries is at
http://searcheurope.com 

and type in the name of the country you wish to research in the search field. This site is a great source o find information for almost every European country.

From 1875 through 1918, Galicia was divided into 74 administrative districts and sub-districts.

Global Gazetteer
A great web site. It is a directory of 2,880,532 of the world's cities and towns, sorted by country and linked to a map for each town. A tab separated list is
ilable for each country.
www.calle.com/world/

Towns of Galicia
What a great site by Roman Zakharii! There are tons of information and photos linked to this site
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Many of the microfilm records photographed by the LDS, are supposed to be deposited in the Polish Archives of Warsaw and Katowice, as in the Ukrainian Archives in L'viv (Lwów or Lemberg in the Austro-Hungarian Empire). There are no complete listing of Galician villages on-line, however, there are several excellent gazetteers in hard copy and some are available at FHL (Family History library) or those that were filed by the LDS. To determine what LDS has for Galicia, you need to examine the FHL Catalog at
http://www.familysearch.org

and also examine this site:
http://lemko.org/genealogy/galiciapl.html 

One of the best resources for information that I know of, is the JewishGen Archives
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop

If you wish to review files in any of the SIG Archives
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop 

If the town you are researching doesn't show having records available, consider determining which was the Administrative District and Sub-district town nearest. The Jewish Community in each town was required by law to collect the vital records for all the towns that were part of the Sub-district. Some Galician towns are now either located in Poland or in Ukraine, so when you search the AGAD record indices, you may want to change the Province from Poland to Ukraine.

The indices do not have all the genealogical relevant data. You can order the actual record from the AGAD Archives using the Order Form


1881 Great Britain CD Lookup

If you suspect that one of your ancestors went to England to live,
email
Jane@Henio.Muc.De  and she has offered to do a lookup.

1881 British Census & National Index Installation Guide
http://www.the-dicksons.org/adobe/1881_install_instructions.pdf


1890-1891 Index of New York Immigrants from Austria, Poland and Galicia

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/1890ny.htm


1891 Galician Business Directory Database

Compiled by Phyllis Kramer, offers over 20,000 surnames and over 1,000 shtetls. This database was transcribed from a photocopy of the directory, found at the British Library, call number [PP 2440.BB C295]
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/galicia1891.htm 


1900 Galician Census

The 1900 Galicia, Austria-Hungary Census is available on Microfilm at the Family History Library as Microfilm #1187928; and in New York City it is on permanent loan. For every small town it lists the number of inhabitants broken down by religion (Roman Catholics, Griedschkatholsch and Israelitsche), Nationality (Deutsch, Polisch, Ruthen, Other) and men, women and Children. It also lists the number of Synagogues, Hebrew Schools, Telegraph, Rail and Post offices. It is grouped by province making it easy to figure out the names of towns quite nearby, and to pick out the ones with the highest Jewish population. From a posting by Phyllis Kramer

Austrian Census Returns 1869-1890 with Emphasis on Galicia
http://www.feefhs.org/links/galicia/shea.html


1929 Business Directory of Ustrzyki Dolne

http://www.forum.echte-musik.com/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=4058&start=0


Administrative Districts

There were 74 Districts:
Biala, Bircza, Bobrka, Bochnia, Bohorodczany, Borszczow, Brody, Brzesko, Brzezany, Brzozow, Buczacz, Chrzanow, Cieszanow, Czortkow, Dabrowa, Dolina, Drohobycz, Gorlice, Grodek Jagiellonski, Grybow, Horodenka, Husiatyn, Kossow, Krakau, Krosno, Lancut, Limanowa, Lisko, Lemberg (Lwow), Mielec, Mosciska, Myslenice, Nadworna, Nisko, Neu Sandec (Nowy Sacz), Nowy Targ, Pilzon, Podhajce, Przemysl, Przemyslany, Rawa Ruska, Rohatyn, Ropczyce, Rudki, Rzeszow, Sambor, Sanok, Skalat, Sniatyn, Sokal, Stanislawow, Staremiasto, Stryj, Tarnobrzeg, Tarnopol, Tarnow, Tlumacz, Trembowla, Turka, Wieliczka, Wadowice, Zaleszczyki Zbaraz, Zloczow, Zolkiev, Zydaczow, Zywiec
http://www.pgsa.org/Inter/galizien.php


Ancient History of Galicia

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm


Archives

AGAD Archives
(The Archiwum Glowne Akt Dawnych - The Central Archives of Historical Records in Warsaw) this site will provide you with the ability to order records from their archives. JRI-Poland database has added more indices from these records - over 20,000 - which include Tarnopol birth and marriage indices and Trembowla birth indices. Also included are Kozowa births from 1877 to 1892; Tarnopol births from 1866 to 1897, Marriages from 1878 to 1897 and Trembowla births from 1877 to 1891.

The Archives is the repository of 2,010 Jewish metrical books for the area of the former Lwów, Stanisiawow and Tarnopol Voyevodship (now known as L'viv, Ivano Frankivsk and Ternopol Oblasts in Ukraine). These registers are mainly for the period from 1877-1899 when these areas were a part of the Austro-Hungarian province of Galicia. Other Jewish metrical books for this area will be found in the L'viv branch of the Ukraine State Archives. The overall total of records is estimated to be close to two million and are generally written in Polish. There are separate books for births, marriages and deaths. Information about the JRI-Poland AGAD Archives Project can be viewed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/

Altogether, the JRI-Poland reports that they have indexed more than 1.5 million records. The goal is to create a searchable on-line database of the indices of all 19th century Jewish records from current and former territories of Poland. Further information about the project can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriintro.htm 

Note that to write to the Archives, you can write in English. To a registry office, local official, etc., write in Polish. Writing in the language of the person that you are writing to is always best ... it exhibits respect and courtesy. Make it as easy as possible if you want the quickest response. Six to eight months for a reply, is not uncommon.

Archive Addresses,
Oblast and Raions names in Ukraine; Genealogical Sources in Russian, Ukrainian and Byelorussian Archives Based on professional research experience.
http://www.lemko.org/genealogy/oblasts.html

Archive Addresses
Polish Archives addresses
http://www.donhoward.net/genpoland/geninfo4.htm

Central State Historical Archives Lviv
Tsentralny Derzhavnyi Istorychnyi Arkhiv (TsDIA-L)
290008, Lviv - 8, pl. Sobornosti Square 3-a,
Ukraine
Phone/Fax: (0322) 72 35 08 or 72 30 63
Director is Orest Laroslavoych Matsiuk; Deputy Director (Directress) is Diana Peltc who, it has been noted, forwards personal researcher requests to a "freelancer" who then increases the price, but the cost is still relatively reasonable
archives@cl.lv.ukrtel.net 
Hours are Monday through Friday 9 to 3 pm.
http://www.donhoward.net/genpoland/geninfo4.htm

Director of the Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine
110 Solomianska Street, 24
252601 Kiev, Ukraine

http://www.huri.harvard.edu/abb_grimsted/K-3.html

It is recommended that both addresses be also written in Ukrainian. A sample of how to address the Archive can be found at
http://lemko.org/genealogy/galiciapl.html 

where you will also find 'Vital and Marriage records from Greek Catholic and Orthodox Parishes in Former Austrian Galicia, Former Malo Rus, Ukraine, Poland and Belarus.'

'Letter Writing Guide to Archives
http://www.halgal.com/archivesineurope.html 

There is an Excel spreadsheet that includes a good deal of information about the records of these 90 district and sub-district towns and a status report for each town is constantly being updated.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/galicia/index.htm

Each year, the Warsaw Srodmiescie USC Archives transfers vital records registers to AGAD. These are registers that only include vital records that have now become more than 100 years old. This transfer occurs in compliance with Polish privacy laws that permit public access to vital records only after 100 years. Recently, AGAD had received many registers that contain records mainly for 1898 and 1899. These registers will be available for indexing about September 2001.

Should you contact the Polish State Archives, the following information should be of value. Len Markowitz
priluki@voicenet.com  offered the following in a posting at Gesher Galicia SIG: 'I guess that it is time to repeat the method that I have used successfully to send money to Poland. Admittedly, it has been about five years since I have last done this, but it was done on at least 4 occasions. To pay for information from the Polish State Archives, purchase a Postal Money Order at your local post office for about $1 - not an International Postal Money Order, which costs about $8.50 (five years ago). Address the Postal Money Order to the bank, including the bank account number, suggested previously by the Polish State Archives. Also make a copy of the Postal Money Order and send it with your next letter to the Polish State Archives'

Another method of handling payment to the
Polish archives is to check out a personal PayPal account
www.paypal.com 

This commercial service offers a wide variety of payment options, including electronic transfers from your bank account to another. PayPal sends you a confirmation of your transaction.

Note:
One of the problems is the frequent name changes, not just of families, but of towns in which they lived. Check out this site that Miriam Margolyes wrote about which contains a list showing most of the hundreds of town name changes from German to Polish in 19th Century Posen Province

http://www.posen-l.com/


Arenda

A leasing system in Galicia.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0002_0_
01275.html


Birth Records Information

Contact the Registry Office (Urzad Stanu Cywilnego, USC) in Poland directly, rather than a Consulate. The USC will perform the search for records and will send it to the Polish Consulate nearest to your residence. You will be billed for their efforts, Upon payment by money order or certified check, the Consulate will then send any material that the Registry Office has. Request from the manager of the USC a complete extract of the entry, rather than a brief certificate. Site is in Polish
http://bip.city.poznan.pl/bip/public/bip/organizacje.html?co=print&or_
id=12&or_typ=W


Books  
             

"Austrian Census for Galicia"
Authored by Gayle Schlissel Riley and edited by the
FEEFHS Webmaster
http://feefhs.org/links/galicia/1880-gal.html


Austrian Census Returns 1859-1910 With Emphasis on Galicia
Authored by Johnathan Shea, A.G.
http://search.datapages.com/data/open/offer.do?target=%2Fspecpubs
%2Fmethodo1%2Fdata%2Fa069%2Fa069%2F0001%2F0000%2F0001.
htm%3Fq%3D%252BtextStrip%253Abrine


"Dimensions of a Triangle: Polish-Ukrainian=Jewish Relations in Galicia"
This shows that Poles constituted the gentry in Galicia, owning most of the landed estates and sharing very little with Jews around the turn of the 19th century, who by the beginning of the 20th century had begun to buy the estates. Polish peasants identified Jews with the manor owners and resented them at least as much as they did the nobility, according to Hinka's study.


"Economic Origins of anti-Semitism: Poland and Its Jews in the Early
Modern Period
"
Authored by Hillel Levine and


"History of the Jews in Russian and Poland"
both address the subject, though just in passing.


"Studies in Polish Jewry: Focusing on Galician Jews, Poles and Ukrainians"
Edited by Israel Bartel and Antony Polansky. Further information can be found in Naomi Fatouros; review on Gesher Galicia SIG memo of October 15, 2001
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/ 


Deciphering Galician Record Heading from Different Years

http://www.feefhs.org/journal/11/bielawa.pdf

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/galicia/GalicianVitalRecords_Titles_
Nov2002.pdf
 


DOEW's Database

The DOEW's database of over 62,000 Austrian victims of the Shoah is searchable by any combination of first and last name and date and place of birth.
http://www.doew.at/ausstellung/shoahopferdb_en.html

The site is important to Galitzianers because so many Galician Jews made their way to the Austrian capital in the late 1800s and early 1900s, in search of economic, cultural, and educational opportunities. Tragically, immigration to this "enlightened" city did not save them from the same fate that befell their relatives in Poland.

Searching the DOEW database by place of birth, I tried a number of Galician towns (using the spellings listed) to see how many Austrian victims are listed with these birthplaces. Here are the results:


Boryslav 58 victims
Brody 249
Drohobycz 91
Jaroslau 88
Kolomea 197
Krakau 267
Przemysl 130
Rzeszow 50
Sambor 53
Stanislau 255
Stryj 102
Tarnopol 225
Tarnow 188


People born in dozens of other Galician towns -- thousands more Galician victims -- also appear in the database. On the other hand many birthplaces are unlisted because they didn't appear in the records used to create the database. Past discussions suggest that the names of Galicia-born Austrian victims who were Polish citizens or stateless may not appear in the database; I would appreciate hearing from anyone who knows if this is the case. Other victims are absent from the online database because their deaths were not officially "confirmed."

An article by Gershon Lehrer appeared in Avotaynu Spring 2012 issue entitled:
"How and Why Galician Jewish Refugees Became Stateless After World War I"

"Blumen der Erinnerung" ("Flowers of Memory")

http://www.aletterstothestars.at

is another site with similar information -- plus the victims' last known street addresses. Search its database by first name, last name, town of origin or address.  Use the white search box, then click "Suche starten").  Alternatively, on the home page, click "Die Liste der Ermordeten" (List of the Murdered). On the next page, use the search box in the upper left and then click "Suchen." In the results, click on a name for more information about the person. Results can be sorted by name or address ("adresse") to group family members. To navigate long lists of results, use the page selector ("Gehe zu Seite.") Names marked with a white rose (a symbol for resistance) have been memorialized by Austrians participating in the Letter to the Stars program. The buttons labeled "alle" [all], "frei" [available], and "reserviert" [reserved] also refer to the "adoption" of victims by Austrians.

http://www.lettertothestars.at/suche.php

"Letters to Heaven"
written by Austrian schoolchildren to some of the victims, appear at
http://www.lettertothestars.at/himmelsbriefe.php
 
On both sites, it is possible to search using the first few letters of a name or town. On the DOEW site, use an asterisk at the end of the letters for a wild card search; LTTS assumes a wild card search and always produces all words beginning with the letters you have entered.

Please note that changes have been made to each of these sites over the past few years, so some of the URLs and instructions that appear in old messages may no longer apply.

Neither site is limited to victims from Vienna. They include people who lived anywhere in what is now Austria -- but the majority (especially of the Galitzianers) were Viennese.

I am very grateful to Celia Male -- a very active and knowledgeable contributor to the Austria-Czech list and a new subscriber to Gesher Galicia's -- for teaching me the power of these two databases. For an excellent overview of Jewish genealogical resources in present-day Austria, see Randy Schoenberg's. 
From a posting by Renee Stern Steinig genmaven@gmail.com


"Beginner's Guide to Austrian- Jewish Genealogy"
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/ausguide.htm 


Eastern Galicia

There is an on-going project by the JRI-Poland, to index all the vital records held by the AGAD Archives in Warsaw. You can search this database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm 

Enter your surname using the "Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex" and Province = Ukraine.

There were 90 East Galician Administrative district and sub district towns in the AGAD project
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/galicia/index.htm

then click on '90 towns' in the first paragraph. There are two ways to determine if your town's records were registered in one of these 90 towns.


East European Genealogical Society

http://www.eegsociety.org/Home.aspx


Eastern Slovakia  (Slovak and Carpatho-Rusyn Genealogical Research)

http://www.iarelative.com/slovakia.htm

http://www.lemko.org/related.html 


Family History Library (FHL)

"First of all, for those not familiar with using the catalog (and as a previously record-deprived Galitzianer, you might not be!): Click on
http://www.familysearch.org/eng/library/fhl/frameset_library.asp

http://www.familysearch.org

Click "Library," then
"Family History Library Catalog," then
"Place Search." Enter Lviv,
 then follow these links:
"Ukraine, L'viv,"
"Ukraine, L'viv - Jewish records
,"
"Metrical books, 1820-1939."
Finally, on the page that says "Jewish Congregation. L'viv," click "View Film Notes" for details on the contents of each of the 108 rolls of new microfilm.

I found references to vital records from the following towns, filmed from originals at the Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine in Lviv:

Berezhany, Bilyi Kamin , Bolekhiv, Borshchiv, Budaniv, Bukachivtsi, Chortkiv, Hlyniany, Horodok, Hrymativ, Husiatyn, Ivano-Frankivsk, Kolomyia, Kosiv, Kozelnyky, Kozliv, Krycha, Kudryntsi, Liubych, Lviv, Melnytsia, Mostyska, Mykulynitsi, Nadvirna, Naraiv, Navariia, Nesterov, Novy Vitkiv, Okopy, Olesko, Ozeriany, Ozerna, Pidhaitsi, Pidvolochysk, Probizhna, Radekhiv, Rozdol, Rudky, Sambir, Skalat, Sokal, Stare Misto, Strusiv, Stryi, Sukhostav, Tartakiv, Ternopil, Tuchyn, Turka, Velyki Mosty, Velyki Ochi, Vodiane, Zbarazh, Zboriv, Znesinnia, Zolochiv

Please check for yourself in case I missed any towns. Once I saw my town -- Ozeriany -- I had trouble focusing!
http://www.halgal.com/TsDIAL.html

Note that these are current place names as spelled in the library catalog. In many cases spellings differ from the contemporary spellings that appear in the JewishGen ShtetlSeeker, the revised edition of
"Where Once We Walked",
and/or Gesher Galicia Family Finder. Some cross checking in these sources and on Routes to Roots Foundation website should help clarify the identity of the towns.
http://www.rtrfoundation.org/

The records are not yet cataloged by individual locality name, so a Place Search for Ozeriany, for
example, does not bring up a link to Jewish records. As the search results state, "This is a preliminary description provided to allow immediate microfilm access." From a posting by Renee Stern Steinig


Galicia (Region)

Chapters on districts of Kolomyia and Stryy from the dissertation Emergence of genocide in Galicia and resettlement transports to Belzec extermination camp - Galician Jewish Celebrities
http://resources.ushmm.org/Holocaust-Names/List-Catalog/display/details.php?type=nlcat&id=140520&ord=23 

Galicia
(Gallich, Galitsiya, Halicz, Galizien)
Resources, map and links
http://www.rootsweb.com/~autwgw/agsgai.htm

http://www.pgsa.org/pubindex.htm 


Galician Jewish Celebrities
http://www.cjh.org/pdfs/GaliciaResources07.pdf


Holocaust
Rabka Police School
http://www.deathcamps.org/reinhard/rabka.html


Galicia

Popiel Family site contains great background information about Galicia and this particular Polish family background
http://kingpopiel.tripod.com/

http://members.tripod.com/krolpopiel/ 

A quarterly non-Jewish Galician genealogical magazine.
Edward Tadeusz Wojtakowski, Responsible Editor
Editorial Offices
Galicia,
P. O. Box 312,
PL-50-950 Wroclaw 2 Poland

Telephone and Fax: + 48 (71) 61 32 16
http://emol.org/zucker/genealogy/galiciaeurope.html


Galicia and Bukovina War Refugees Directory

Based on an *initial* official registration with the authorities on arrival [first address and number of people in family group]. QED - there were 3 people in the MOSCISKER family group, so we have effectively confirmed the *3 os.* problem and any further *os* problems, if they arise again. Thus, the little word *os* can give us quite a lot of genealogical information! This information was obtained from a posting by Celia Male
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GaliciaPoland-Ukraine/message/20288


Galicia Discussion Group

Galicia Discussion Group
To access the mailing list's archives
http://www.topica.com/lists/galicia

http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/about_gg.html

http://genforum.genealogy.com/galicia 


Galicia Research List

This site is a wonderful source for the Jewish genealogist researching their ancestry and it includes a link to translate documents; links to general information, Associations and Societies, Historical Records, Gazetteers and Maps, Archives and Libraries and more at
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/html/research.html

http://www.feefhs.org/

I noted in a posting on JewishGen by Steve Gold that Gayle Riley has a contact to do research in Krakow and she may be able to put you in touch with that researcher
Email: Gayle at
key2pst@PACBELL.NET 


Galicia Surname Index

A consolidated index of Galicia surnames, with links to web pages having databases of surnames is in the planning states by the Gesher Galicia. Galicia related databases already on-line as searchable databases on JewishGen will be part of the All-Galicia Database.
http://www.avotaynu.com/csi/databases.htm

http://polishgeno.com/?page_id=35

http://www.geshergalicia.org/families/


Galician Record Books

The LDS has filmed the Galician record books which are in the Lviv Archive in the Ukraine (these are different records than those which have been indexed by JRI Poland and are in the AGAD Archive in Warsaw or other Polish archives). These films can now be rented and viewed at any LDS Family History Center.
http://search.geshergalicia.org/

http://www.avotaynu.com/galicia.htm

http://jewishappleseed.org/apple/genlinks.htm


Galician Town Locator

Identify where Jewish vital records were registered, using the Austrian era name, you insert your town's name and click on 'search'. The resultant table will show where Jewish records were kept.
http://www.polishroots.com/Research/Galician_records/tabid/203/Default.aspx

http://friedlan.customer.netspace.net.au/links.htm

http://www.transparent.com/polish/where-in-the-world-is-galicia/


Galitzianer

Articles published in the Fall 2012 issue are:

Town Research Updates -

Jodlowa, Rohatyn and Zurow
"The Holocaust in Stanislawow" by William Tannenzapf
"The Krosono Airfield" by William Leibner
"Jewish Community Life in Brody" by Edward Gelles
"Hunting a Dead Nazi" by Susan J. Gordon
"A Teacher Returning: Bronia Horn" by Marla Racher Osborn

My "Research Corner" column discusses the new Stanislawow Records Indexing Project for microfilms from the Ivano Frankivsk archives held at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, which include passport
applications from the 1920s and 30s for residents from that region (some for entire families) that have been digitized by the Museum.  Also discussed are new records and maps acquired by the Cadastral Map and Landowner Records Project, updates to our online Map Room, and the Polish Magnates Records Project.

You must to be a dues-paying current member of GG to receive "The Galitzianer," not just a subscriber to this discussion group. If you are
not a member, but want to join go here for info:
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/join_gg.html

January 1, 2013 is the official debut of the Gesher Galicia re-designed website, with a "members only" portal to our "Gesher Galicia Family Finder" and a searchable database containing 20 years of issues from "The G," which means that members will be able to
search all the articles by surname, town name or keyword terms. The members portal will require a log in and password that will be provided to all
current members.


The new website offers searching capabilities and quick access to the All Galicia Database so you can trace family members and learn more about your cities, towns and shtetls, including links to photos, videos, maps and other research pages.

And warm thanks to our members from the entire board of Gesher Galicia.

Pamela Weisberger
President & Research Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com

www.GesherGalicia.org
www.search.GesherGalicia.org
www.maps.GesherGalicia.org
www.inventory.GesherGalicia.org

Gesher Galicia offers records including: birth records transcribed from old Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine in Lviv; old out-of-copyright Polish telephone books from library collections; early 20th century tax records copied from the private files of a Chabad rabbi in Ukraine; Landsmanshaftn records obtained from the YIVO archives in New York; Holocaust files from Yad Vashem; and more.
http://search.geshergalicia.org/


Gazetteer of the former Galicia and Bukowina (about 16,000 towns listed)

Institute of Historical Family Research in Vienna
Produced by Felix Gundacher This has a CD Rom of maps from the 1880s.
http://www.cjh.org/pdfs/Austria.pdf

Jewish Records of Vienna; Dictionary of Bohemian Parishes in the Czech Republic; Register of vital statistics in the Czech State Archives; Register of Jewish Vital Statistics in Czech State Archives pertaining to Bohemia; Comprehensive Index of Military Weddings in Vienna 1775-1860; Names and addresses Archives and more.
http://www.wien.gv.at/english/history/archives/ancestors.html


"Genealogical Research Problems Concerning The Former Empire"
Offers an excellent dissertation on many of the problems you will encounter in researching these countries.
http://www.familysearch.org/eng/docs/Jewish_Genealogy_Research_07_
2007.pdf


"Genealogical Gazetteer of Galicia" (3rd Edition)
Includes more than a simple list of village locations ... it includes data from various church shamanisms (Greek Catholic, Roman Catholic, Evangelical) and Jewish synagogue locations. Cost is around $40.00 (US) Contact: Brian J. Lenius, Box 18, Group 4, R.R. #1, Anola, Manitoba R0E OA0, Canada. Email:
info@eegsociety.org  The Gazetteer is available also at the LDS or from Brian.

http://www.lenius.ca/GazetteerOrder/GazetteerOrderForm.htm


Genealogical Research in some lands of the former Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy

http://www.centroconsult.sk/genealogy/researchers.html

http://genealogy.about.com/od/austria/Austrian_Genealogy_Family_History
.htm

http://www.iarelative.com/slovaki2.htm


General Haller's Army

This 'army' formed in 1917 as the Polish Army in France, was also known as the 'Blue Army' because of the color of their uniforms. Many of the fighters were Americans of non-Jewish Polish descent. They fought on the Western Front.

After the end of WW I, Haller's Army were involved in the liberation of parts of Poland and western Ukraine from the Red Army and Ukrainians. There is evidence that many Galicians, including Jews who had been held in various Allied prisoner-of-war camps volunteered to serve under General Haller. An article containing much information is being planned to be published in a future issue of The Galitzianer.

http://www.hallersarmy.com/


Gesher Galicia Discussion Group

This 700 active member group offers The Galitzianers and Gesher Galicia Family Finder publications by mail. This special interest group (SIG) is for those with Jewish roots in the former Austrian-ruled province of Galicia. Edward Goldstein is the Editor of The Galitzianer
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/ 

The Galicia SIG
has a searchable database of names from data extracted from microfilms located in the LDS Family History Library and/or US Holocaust Memorial Museum.
To Contact the SIG:
geshergalicia@optonline.net 
http://www.ushmm.org 


To subscribe to the group:

galicia@lyris.jewishgen.org 

The Gesher Galicia membership year runs from 1 October to 30 September. Subscribing to the Gesher Galicia discussion group (listserv) does not constitute membership in Gesher Galicia, Inc. which is a dues organization. Membership entitles you to receive the quarterly publication "The Galitzianer," the yearly "Gesher Galicia Family Finder," which lists the surnames, towns and contact information of other researchers, and enables you to apply for research project funding through the Gesher Galicia research grant program. In the past we've supported yizkor book translations, vital record and school record research, and matched funds to JRI-Poland indexing projects and JewishGen research work. To learn more about joining Gesher Galicia
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/join_gg.html 

"Encyclopedia of Galician Rabbis and Scholars".
The Spring Issue, 1994 (Volume 1, No. 3)  has a list of Galician Rabbis in Rabbi Meir Wunder's Meorei Galicia (Volume IV)

Listing of some doctors, lawyers and dentists in various Galician Towns In the Winter, 1996, Volume 3, No. 2 issue, there is a 1922


GGD 1939 Resettlement Records Page  (Galizien German Descendants)

There are 55,694 individuals and 18,689 families representing 5,451 surnames in this database
http://www.galiziengermandescendants.org/BDC_Files/index.htm 


Hirsch (Baron de Hirsch)

Baron Maurice and Baroness Clara de Hirsch, without their desire to rescue the Jews of the Pale after the 1881 assassination of Czar Alexander II - both Canadian, South American and American Agricultural colonies would never have been established. In the U.S., colonies were established including Alliance and Woodbine in New Jersey, and others in North Dakota, or those in South America, such as Moisesville in Argentina or Lipton in Canada.

According to an article in Hadassah Magazine of October/November 2010, Baron de Hirsch usually gets all the credit, but it was Clara (his wife) who used her own considerable fortune and urged her husband to do the same. They established schools in Galicia, for example, to teach Jews how to be farmers before they set off for the New World and supported the colonists until they were able to become self-sufficient.

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/Baronhirsch.html


Historical Archives of Ukraine

Has Austrian period cadastral records for Galicia. The LDS has filmed and made available all Galician Jewish vital records currently in the Lviv Archive. These are primarily pre-1877 records which are not part of the Warsaw Archive collection indexed by JRI-Poland. These are films of the actual record books which have not been indexed and they have not been easily available until now. Most should be written in German or Polish; little information in early records, more information in later records. You can see details at their website
http://www.familysearch.org 

Place search for Lviv, topic Jewish Records. This includes records for towns Brody, Horodenka, Drohobycz, Stryj, Sambor, Tarnopol, Lemberg and other Galician cities going back to about 1800 for some towns. The Drohobycz records have been ordered to determine exactly what was filmed for that town. It should include birth records from 1816 to 1869 and death records 1816 to the 1830's. From a posting by Mark Jacobson


JewishGen ShtetlSeeker

Locate your town (shtetl)
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlseeker/loctown.htm


Jewish Records Indexing

Poland AGAD project includes 87 Administrative District towns and the Indexing of the 19th century Jewish vital records of 90 towns and villages in the former Galician Province in Eastern part of the former Austrian province of Galicia. A map of the area is included in this site which shows what is currently
work in progress, etc.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/index.htm


Lemko

A name of the people of the Carpathian Mountains, commonly known as Lemkos. If you are looking in this area of Galicia, which is now mostly located in Ukraine, I would suggest looking at this informative site. Historical, background and genealogical research information is offered
http://www.lemko.org/ 



  Maps of Galicia


http://www.zolynia.org/images/galicia-map-f.gif

http://europa.eu/abc/maps/regions/spain/galicia_en.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetLinks/lviv/links.html

Austrian Galicia Map
http://www.pgsa.org/galicmap.htm 

http://www.zum.de/whkmla/histatlas/eceurope/haxpoland.html 

Austrian Galicia Administrative Map
Plus a Resource Center, other maps, History, Ships, and more at
http://www.pgsa.org/galicmap.htm 

Austro-Hungarian Empire -Galicia Map
http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~feefhs/maps/ah/ah-galic.html 

http://feefhs.org/maps/ah/ah-galic.html


Should you require old maps of the Austro-Hungarian military topographic maps (scale 1:75k), the U.S. Library of Congress has quite a collection.

"3rd Military Mapping Survey of Austria-Hungary: Index Sheet of the
General Map of Central Europe
(1:200 000)"
http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/digkonyv/topo/3felmeres.htm

Austrian Kingdom of Galicia in 1772 http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm 

Austro-Hungarian Empire
http://www.iarelative.com/maps/ah_1895/ 


http://feefhs.org/maps/AH/ah-galic.html

The Baltics - East Russian Empire 1882
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 

Morg
A Galician morg is approximately 5,000 square meters. The name comes from the German word 'morgen', describing the area of land that can be ploughed in one day.
http://af.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hektaar

Open Street Maps
The crowd-sourced mapping project 
OpenStreetMap has amassed a million contributors since its inception in 2005 and, according to navigation app maker Skobbler, boasts greater accuracy in England, Russia and Germany than rivals such as Google Maps.  I tried the site and found an accurate drawing of my father's ancestral town Tal'ne, Ukraine.  Almost every country is available as is most towns
http://openstreetmap.org


Meorei Galicia Indexes to Meorei Galicia (Encyclopedia of Galician Sages)

With two indexes is on-line and includes 1,362 surnames and 324 cities, towns and shtetls found in Indexes to Meorei Galicia.

Meorei Galicia: Encyclopedia Lekhakhmei Galicia (Encyclopedia of Galician Sages) is a five volume bio-bibliographical work containing extensively detailed genealogies of Galician rabbinical families. This impressive and scholarly work is one of the most extensive and reliable sources of rabbinical genealogy written in the twentieth century.

The author, Rabbi Meir Wunder, is chairman of the Institute for the Commemoration of Galician Jewry. The Institute's main achievement is the published five volume Meorei Galicia.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Rabbinic/journal/mgalicia.htm 


Military records

A useful source of genealogical information. In the context of Galician Poland (1772-1918) many of our male ancestors undertook military service freely, while others were obliged to go on active duty for 2 or 3 years, followed by perhaps 8-10 years in reserve units. The army kept detailed records on its personnel at all levels and useful information can be gleaned from these. Records for the period up until 1869 were retained in Vienna at the Vienna Kriegsarchiv and has also been extensively filmed by the Mormon Church and can be traced through the Family History catalogue.

It is also possible to write for copies of personal records from years up to 1869 to the Archive in
Vienna.
Kriegsarchiv
Nottendorfergasse 2,
A-1030 Wien Austria.
Further information can be found at
http://www.polishroots.com/austrian_recruit.asp 

Here you will find an "Austrian Recruitment Search"

For post 1867 military records, write to the Archives in Ukraine This site is offering information on "Austrian Census Returns 1869 to 1910 with Emphasis On Galicia"
http://www.feefhs.org/ah/gal/jshea-ac.html


Newsgroups

soc.genealogy.german and soc.culture.austria
http://groups.google.com/group/soc.genealogy.german/topics

http://groups.google.com/group/soc.culture.austria/topics


Post Offices of Former Austrian Territories

Includes Base post offices in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bohemia, Hungary, Levant, Lombardy, Mantua, Moravia, Silesia, Prague, Poland (Galicia), Venetia and Yugoslavia - all places are in alphabetical order, with provinces prefixed
http://www.kitzbuhel.demon.co.uk/austamps/pobook/main.htm


WW I in Galicia

Proclamation of western Ukrainian National Republic  http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/
galicia.htm
 


Research Steps

These steps are offered by Phyllis Kramer to help Todd Katz search for a shtetl called Semyatichi:

1. Checked on JewishGen's Shtetl Seeker for the name of the shtetl, using the
    standard query. 
    No results. Tried with the Soundex ... aha ... it has another name ... Semiematichi

2. Clicked on the longitude/latitude ... aha ... a map of its location. Printed that out.

3. Checked on the JewishGen Family Finder, using the standard query ... no
    results.

4. Checked on JewishGen Family Finder using the Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex ...
    aha   .. for Semyatichi ... 83 researchers listed ...good chance that's the
    town. Why not Email: some of them, especially any researchers looking for
    similar sounding surnames?

5. Checked the 1891 Galician Business Directory ... 3 hits

6. Checked on the archives ... 187 messages with Siemiatycze in it. Lots of folks
    interested in this shtetl ... bets some of those prior postings are fascinating ...

7. Two more to go ... the JewishGen web wide search ... and ShtetLinks

Slavic Cataloging Manual - Ukrainian Transliteration Table
http://www.indiana.edu/~libslav/slavcatman/


Central Area of Galicia

"Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia"
1902 The Polish Provinces of Russia-East Russian Empire 1902
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 

"The Comprehensive Atlas and Geography of the World"
Published 1882 by Blackie and Sons, Edinburgh, Scotland Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html

East Prussia - German Empire 1882
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 

Galicia
The western area Turkel settled in and other map sites

Galicia-Austro-Hungarian Empire 1882
Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html

Galicia under Hungarian and Polish Rules Time Line 
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/
galicia.htm
 

Galician Administrative Map showing the district names.
http://www.pgsa.org/galicmap.htm 



 
Maps

General Map (in Russian) of Galicia (Western Ukraine)
Including Transcarpathia, West Bukovina and southern parts of Volyn on the north. You can click on the map to enlarge the map
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Map of Austro-Hungarian Empire 1882 - Galicia in color
http://www.feefhs.org/maps/ah/ah-gaic.html

Map of Galicia 1875
http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetLinks/lviv/links.html

http://www.polishroots.com

Shows the administrative divisions. Once connected, select 'Site Search' from the left hand side menu, type in Galician Maps and note the several maps displayed. The first one is the administrative map. You can save the map image to your computer by using the right click button on your mouse and saving the image/target as a bitmap file. Then you can print it enlarged for easier viewing.

Map of eastern part of Galicia (in Russian)
Namely Ternopol region with river Zbruch on the east. Zbruch was the eastern border of Galicia and Austria since it was also a border between Russian and Austrian Empires. You can click on this map to enlarge
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

The river Zbruch is administrative border between Ternopol and Khmelnytsky (former Proskuriv/Proskurov regions of Ukraine).

Map of Poland
http://mapa.szukacz.pl/ 

Map of Ukraine
http://www.discusmedia.com/catalog.php?searchpart=Uk  

Name and Geographic Locations
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Museum of Family History

A webpage has been designed by Steve Lasky to facilitate your visit to his virtual museum website. All that he has on his site that could be of interest to those of you who are Gesher Galicia researchers will be listed on this one page, now and in the future. There may be accidental omissions on the list provided, so if you find any such omissions and are certain that it falls within the Gesher Galicia region of interest, please let him know. Also note that there may be towns listed that do not fall within the area of interest to Gesher Galicia researchers. This is unintentional and Steve should be notified if such errors are found. For example, a cemetery plot located in New York or New Jersey may be associated with a town in Poland or the Ukraine that is of interest to the GG researcher, but whose name also belongs to a town(s) that is not of interest to the GG researcher. The list will be amended as errors are found and
as more material is added to the museum's website.
http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/geshergalicia.htm


Names     Names

"As it is generally known, Galician Jews have been compelled to adopt German sounding surnames in 1787 during Joseph II, Empress Maria Theresa son's rule, following the introduction in 1781 the first genuine reforms in Central Europe - Judenreformen und Toleranzpatent (Jew-reforms and Edicts of Tolerance).
http://polishgeno.com/?page_id=35

When in 1772 during the 1st Partition, Austria has captured new lands, which covered all of Western and Eastern Galicia, the Empire 1787 rule of surname adoption was extended to the all territories. This also included parts of Wolyn and Podolia that have captured by Austria at the same time. This rule was extended to the regions of Sandomierz, Lublin and Radom acquired by Austria in 1795." From a posting by Marlene Bishow


Passports for Citizens of Galicia

Local authorities throughout the Empire issued passports. The register that LDS has only includes a listing of passports that were issued by the Vienna passport office (i.e. the register doesn't include passports which were issued by other offices in Austria, such as Galicia, Bohemia, Dalmatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, etc.).

Here is what LDS has from the Vienna Passport Office:
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/supermain
frameset.asp?display=titledetails&titleno=96036&disp=Pa%C3%9
Fregister+1792%2D1918%20%20&columns=*,0,0


Note, that it's just the register of passports which were issued by that office (i.e., it's not the register of the several hundred passport offices which were located throughout the Austrian portion of the Austro-Hungarian Empire).


Polish Jewish Web site

Offers a lot of information and it is in English
http://www.diapozytyw.pl/en/site/


Posen-Prussia-German Empire East 1882

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Routes To Roots

This site offers travel advice
http://www.routestoroots.com

and a searchable database by town name
http://www.rtrfoundation.org 


Russia-The Crimean - Russian Empire-European Russia 1882

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Silesia-Prussia-German Empire East 1882

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego

An excellent classical Polish gazetteer. It is available in the
New York Public Research Library
42nd Street and 5th Avenue
New York
and the Mormons (FHC) in New York City have the entire Slownik on several rolls of microfilms.
http://dir.icm.edu.pl/pl/Slownik_geograficzny/


Spanish Galicia

Yes, there is one, but is it relevant?  It is in Spain.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galicia_(Spain) 


Szlachta Zagrodowa (Szlachta zaściankowa)

In Polish this refers to a 'land nobility'. They were the 'upper crust' and were small landowners, presumptuous and arrogant: - "A nobleman on his land is equal to a governor'.
http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Szlachta_za%C5%9Bciankowa


Time Line of Galician Medieval History

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm 


Translating Polish   Languages

Check out this site for free assistance
http://www.dcitionaries.travlang.com/ 


Vital and Marriage Records From Greek Catholic and Orthodox Parishes

In former Austrian Galicia, former Malo Rus, Ukraine, Poland, and Belarus (former Byelorussia) available through The Mormon Family History Library (FHL)
http://lemko.org/genealogy/galiciapl.html

 

Towns and Cities in Galicia

 
Great Synagogue of Drohobych
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/drohobych.htm 

To find places that were once known to be in Galicia, check out the Austrian Census files. To search for Vital Records for Galician Towns Jewish Genealogy on
http://www.polishroots.org/galicia_towns.htm 

Major cities, towns and some villages of Galicia are available
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

At this great site, you will find the Official Name; the Ukrainian Name; the Polish Name; the Austrian Name; the German Name; the Russian Name and the Soviet Name with all kinds of wonderful links.

For a complete JRI-Poland Project status summary, there is an Excel spreadsheet that is viewable from the GGIR web page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/galicia/index.htm

by clicking on '90 towns' in the first paragraph. Microsoft Excel or an Excel viewer is required to view this spreadsheet.

Ancestral Records
If your ancestral town was near one of the towns listed below, your town's records could have been registered in one of these towns. The Jewish Community in each of these towns was required by law to collect the vital records for all the towns that were part of the sub-district.
http://www.cjh.org/pdfs/GaliciaResources07.pdf

ShtetlSeeker
This site gives variant spellings of towns and villages, as well as map co-ordinates

http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSeeker/loctown.htm


Bavoriv (Baworow, Bavorov)

A village in the Ternopol district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm 


Belchatow

Yizkor Book
A new pamphlet was added to the Yizkor Book Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/projectdesc/YB_Belchatow.html

http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1542

http://liebowitzes.com/belchatow/

http://h-net.msu.edu/cgi-bin/logbrowse.pl?trx=vx&list=h-holocaust&month=0903&week=a&msg=c39fMhXkp4G2eO39XqEG3A&user=&pw=


Belitsky (Chembar)

Chembar (now known as Belitsky) which was in Penza Provence; then eventually sent back as far as Ternopol where they were further detained until 1917 until a smaller group of those who had not by then perished were allowed to return to Rohatyn.
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish
/2006-08/msg00065.html

http://www.haruth.com/jw/JewsGalicia.html


Belsk (Bielsk) and Belsk Uyezd (district)

Records are available in the Grodno (Belarus) archive. These include Revision Lists, family lists and the 1897 Russian Census. These films have not yet been filmed by the FHL, they are planning to do so.


Books  
             

http://books.google.com/books?id=wKP7Ms3qCBgC&pg=PA335&lpg=PA335&dq=belsk+jewish+
community&source=bl&ots=
LJ30uopbZE&sig=_4Jl23
dkjjvoMncoZ7Vv_duo4ls&hl=en#v=onepage&q=belsk%20jewish%20community&f=false


Belz

 

Photo taken by Samuel Gruber in 2000.  One of the few surviving gravestones of the cleared and fenced cemetery.
http://belz-austrian-empire.blogspot.com/2008/01/belz-cemetery.html

A list of names of families from Belz who claimed to have had their homes damaged in WWI. Although listed only once, some of these people had multiple claims. Each record, within the small book that contained them has the family name, given names, house number, parcel number, general street location and actual listing of damages. Everything except specific damages to houses was transcribed by Karen Rosenfeld Roekard & Natalie Dunai in September 2006. If you would like additional information, or the complete listing, please contact Karen Rosenfeld Roekard privately: roekard@lmi.net

http://www.pbase.com/jolka/little_town_belz 

http://belz-austrian-empire.blogspot.com/2008/01/belz-cemetery.html


Berezhany (Brzezany, Brezany, Byeryezhany)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Located 4.5 miles to Zavaliv (Galician mile = 7.5 km) district center in Ternopol region which is in the heart of Galicia. The town site information, the history of medieval town and photographs and an electronic street maps of the town, and more are at
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm 

Memorial page to bygone world of Berezhany Jews
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/brzezaner.htm

Berezhany District
Site contains list, descriptions of all villages, photos, maps, a Brzezaner Memorial Page to Berezhany Jews, Yellow Pages, Telephone and Address Book (in Ukrainian), a list of all villages in the Berezhany district and history at
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm


Bialy Kamien

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district
and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns being indexed.

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/belyi-kamen.html

Names
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/bialykamiensurn.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol2_00114.html


Bibrka (Bobrka Bobrka (G) Bibrka, Bobree)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Brody

Bobrice
is a grammatical form of Bobrka. There are three different towns of Bobrka in three different administrative districts of: Bobrka; Krosno and Lisko. Note that Bobrka spells with an accent over the 'o'. Bobrka was formerly Galicia (near Lemberg) and now in Ukraine. A Yizkor book exists and much of the information appears to be from Landesarchiv in Vienna. The City Hall was destroyed in WW1.
http://galiciantraces.com/bibrka/

http://www.jewishgalicia.net/website/modules/database/Item.aspx?pid=407&type=9&id=482

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bobrka/default.htm 

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/lviv.htm 


http://www.jewish-guide.pl/sites/33 

Contact is Beverly Shulster
bbevy@012.net.il  Beverly has a picture postcard entitled "Rynek w Bobree" and a picture of the local market in the town where her father was born.

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/bibrka.html

Holocaust
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/lviv.htm

http://www.yahadinunum.org/index.php/alphabetically-by-village-name/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_villages_and_towns_depopulated_of_
Jews_during_the_Holocaust


Regional Special Interest Groups:

Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

Yizkor Book,
"Le-Zeykher Kehillot Bobrka u-Benoteha" (Boiberke Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html 


Bielsko Biala

Bielsko-Biala is a regional capital town with a population of about 180 000, the seat of two regional authorities: grodzki and ziemski and of two bishoprics: the Catholic Diocese of Bielsko-Żywiec and the Evangelic-Augsburg Diocese of Cieszyn.
http://web2.um.bielsko.pl/bb/en/index.jsp?var=information 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bielsko-Bia%C5%82a 

http://www.um.bielsko.pl/en/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=14&Itemid=28

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org//ukraine/bielsko-biala.html


Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/oswiecim.html 

Yizkor Book
http://jewishgen.blogspot.com/2010/01/posted-by-warren-blatt
-jewishgen-yizkor.html
 

www.zchor.org/yizkor/books.xls 


Bilshivtsi  (formerly Bolszowce, Bolshovtsy)

http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities 

A village in Halych district. It was once known as Bolszowce when it was in Galicia, but is now knows officially as Bolshovtsy, Ukraine. Once Bilshivtsi was a town with Jewish, Polish and Ukrainian population, but now it is a quite Ukrainian village.
http://www.jewishgalicia.net/Gallery/Bilshivtsy.aspx 

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

http://yizkor.ort.org:8081/index.html 

http://www.ou.org/yerushalayim/yizkor/male.htm 


Bilyavyntsi  (Biliavuntsi, Bialanowce, Bielyavintsy)

A village in Buchach district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Bircza

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html


Bishche (Biszcze)

A village in Berezhany district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Bobrka - (Bobrce Boiberle)

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed.

The town is near Krosno and Zmigrod in Western Galicia according to a translation of the Polish "Slownik Geograficzny" published between 1880 and 1902.

Cemetery
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/bobrka/12,cemeteries/14697,bobrka-18th-century-jewish-cemetery/


http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/pdf/ukraine/bibrka.pdf

Community
http://dcjr.org/index.php/jewish-organizations/2585-jewish-community-council-in-bobrka-legal-statement-1936

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/bobrka/16,accounts-memories/

Holocaust
http://www1.yadvashem.org/yv/en/about/institute/killing_sites_catalog
_details_full.asp?region=Lwow

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobrka/bobrka.html


Bogorodchany

Contact is Susannah R. Juni
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Bohordczany

  

http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Bohorodczany (Brotchin in Yiddish) is a town on the road from Ivano-Frankivsk to Nadvirna. Only the territory of the new  Jewish cemetery could be seen there today.

http://www.jewishgalicia.net/Gallery/Bohorodczany-Brotchin.aspx 

Cemetery
http://www.jewishgalicia.net/About%20the%20Project/Jewish%20Cemetery%20in%20Bohorodczany.aspx


Bojanów

http://www.geshergalicia.org/towns/bojanow/


Bolechow

 

http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities 

In the small town of Bolechow, a building of the Great Synagogue and an amazing Jewish cemetery are preserved.

http://www.jewishgalicia.net/Gallery/Bolechow.aspx

Cemetery
The cemetery is across a couple of hills and is unfenced. There are maybe two hundred vertical gravestones. The inscriptions face away from the graves and in most cases surnames appear on the reverse side. Often full names. The reverse side usually has a number inscribed as well.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kk5P8OliO2g

http://bolechow.ajmendelsohn.com/html/cemetery.html


Bolekhov (Bolekhev)

Located in the area near Ivano Frankivsk (Stanislawow) which was in eastern Galicia. There is a major chapter that has been translated by Dr. M. Hendel's "Maskalim and Haskalah (Enlightenment) Movement in Bolekhov in the 19th Century" (35 pages). This chapter should be of interest to anyone researching the region of Galicia, not only in Bolekhov itself. This chapter tells a fascinating story of the history of Jewish schools in the region including mention of the major leaders of the Haskala movement who were from Bolekhov, and also discusses some of the controversies which stirred the political and education spheres of our ancestors. More chapters are currently being translated - for further info and status
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0004
_0_03266.html


www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf  

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bolekhov/bolekhov.html 


There are 10 articles written by Yonah Ashel-Ellendman, under the heading "Daily Life," pages 219-241, plus other articles from that section on pages 261-263, and pages 267-277 are now in the process of translation.
   

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/bolekhov.html
     


Bolszowce (Bolshovtsy)

Currently Bolshovtsy, Ukraine

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/bilshivtsi.htm

Cemetery
http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=cm&g=show&idg=1041

Holocaust
http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameResults.html?placeBirth=Bolszowce,%20%20Rohatyn,%20%20Stanislawow,%20%20Poland&placeBirthType=LITERAL&language=en

http://www.zchor.org/belzec/belzec.htm

Names
http://digital.cjh.org/R/YDG9GAE1SMFUHSJRX6BD9QMDXXE5SFLN2KN
SRH6XYSCNST6YXS-00449?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=1306958&local_base=GEN01&pds_handle=GUEST


Borislav, (Boryslav, Boryslaw)

Drohobycz (Oil City) and surrounding area - a group of Jewish genealogists headed by Alexander Sharon are working on a web site for these towns and will include Sambor. This group has already identified and compiled names of more than 75 small villages (except for Stryy which has it's own site) Details can be found in the archives of Gesher Galicia SIG galicia@lyris.jewishgen.org 
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0004_0_
03343.html

http://home.earthlink.net/~jodi-poland/id69.html

Cemetery
There is a Jewish cemetery in existence for the past 200 years. More information about the cemetery can be obtained from William Fern
Whfern@aol.com 
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2006-05/msg00198.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Laurel White
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

Town information
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm 


Borshchiv (Borszczow, Borszczew, Borschtschiw, Borshchev, Borshchov)

Located in the center of the Ternopol district in Eastern Galicia. there is a comprehensive list of villages in the area at
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm 

Regional Special Interest Groups 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html


Boryslav (Boryslaw)

A town in Drohobych district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Borzna

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Brezdowicz (Brezdowitz, Bruzowicz)

The shtetl is adjacent to New Rozdol and doesn't show up on most maps.
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/announcements
.html

Cemetery
The cemetery site is at the top of a hill, across some fields and is so thickly wooded and overgrown that it is not identifiable as a cemetery site. There are no graves or stones visible.
http://www.pikholz.org/Trip/Cems.htm


Breslau (see Wroclaw)

Located at one time in the Posen Province. Breslau had become an entrance gate to Prussia and other parts of Germany for Jews from Galicia and the Posen province - probably because the "Schutzjuden" were only allowed to marry one son in Breslau -- so that many stayed only for one generation in Breslau.
http://www.sup.org/book.cgi?book_id=5518 

http://www.jewish-guide.pl/sites/32 

Records
There appears to be between twenty to thirty microfilms containing records of this Jewish community in the FHL Archives.
Births: 1184384
Marriages 1184389
Families: 1184402

Research
The Jewish community archives of this town from the late 18th century to the mid-twentieth century, including materials of Breslau's famed Jewish Theological Seminary are stored with
The Jewish Historical Association
ul. Tlomackie 3/5, 00-090
Warsaw, Poland
Telephone/Fax (48-2) 625 0400
Email
reisner@plearn.edu.pl
http://genealogy.metastudies.net/ZDocs/CEurope/A01.html 


Brody

Located in Brodivs'kyi Raion, L'vivska Oblast. It is about 90 km NE of L'viv. Marjorie Rosenfeld marjorie.rosenfeld@cwix.com  has developed a Brody web site. She has finished the 17th through the 19th century records translations and is developing the 20th century records.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Brody/brody.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

Research
Microfilmed Jewish community metrical records for the towns of Brody, Brzezany, and Lwow (Lemberg) held in the Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine in L'viv, have been added to the LDS-Family History Library Catalog. This means that (for a small mailing fee) researchers can order copies of these films to be sent to their local Family History Centers, where they can view images of the actual records, or view them in Salt Lake City at the FHL -- although film requests may take a few days.

These birth, marriage and death records cover (with some gaps) the following years:
The Jewish Congregation, Brody, 1815-1871;

Jewish Congregation Brzezany, 1820-1864;

Jewish Congregation Lwów, 1801-1889.

For details, here is the link to the film information:
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/super
mainframeset.asp?display=titlefilmnotes&columns=*%2C0%2C0&titleno=1341604&disp=Metrical+books++
 


Broshniv-Osada

http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities 


Brzesko

A medium sized town on the main road halfway between Krakow and Tarnow and Bochnia. Many of its residents left following the big fire of 1904.

Cemetery
http://www.kirkuty.xip.pl/brzeskoang.htm

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nomaderro/2341724020/

Community
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/city/brzesko/

History
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/brzesko/5,history/

http://www.diapositive.pl/brzesko.htm

Holocaust
http://books.google.com/books?id=iitQhYsM-dMC&pg=PA492&lpg=PA492&dq=brzesko+jewish+holocaust&source=
bl&ots=mMxUKNeHNC&sig=m4uS4rVOQeeDx6KT28OROjnlSws&hl=en
#v=onepage&q=brzesko%20jewish%20holocaust&f=false

http://resources.ushmm.org/hsv/source_view.php?SourceId=24478

Research
The Mormons have the birth and marriage registrations records from 1864-1876. The office of civilian affairs there has the records from 1876 onwards.

Yizkor Book
http://www.yivoinstitute.org/index.php?tid=66&aid=125


Brzeziny (Brezany, Berzhan Brezezany)

Brzezany was once in Austria's Galizien (Galicia) ... now it's in Ukraine.


Books  
             

"Together and Apart in Brzezany: Poles, Jews and Ukrainians1919-1945"
Authored by Prof. Eva Hoffman. Brzezany (East Galicia, now-a-days Berezhany in the Ukraine) published by Ben Gurion University in Beer Sheba in 2002. This shtetl was called Berzhan in Yiddish and Brezany in German.
http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1P3-352627891.html 


Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/brzeziny-lodzskierniewickie.html 
 

Research
Jewish vital records have survived the Holocaust and could be in several locations. Check first the Mormon Family History Library (FHL) which has copied records. Also The Central State Historical Archives located in L'viv. Some Jewish records are also in Warszawa (Warsaw, Poland) at the Archives of Ancient Documents.
http://www.dresselgenealogy.us/sources.htm 

http://www.interfam.net/Brzezin%20Cemetery.html 

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0004_0_03675
.html
 

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/brzeziny/3,local-history/ 

http://www.mountaintimes.com/mtweekly/2003/0710/holocaust_series.php3

Microfilmed Jewish community metrical records for the towns of Brody, Brzezany, and Lwow (Lemberg) held in The Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine in L'viv, have been added to the LDS-Family History Library Catalog. This means that (for a small mailing fee) researchers can order copies of these films to be sent to their local Family History Centers, where they can view images of the actual records, or view them in Salt Lake City at the FHL -- although film requests may take a few days.

These birth, marriage and death records cover (with some gaps) the following years:
The Jewish Congregation, Brody, 1815-1871;
 
Jewish Congregation Brzezany, 1820-1864;

Jewish Congregation Lwow, 1801-1889.

For details, here is the link to the film information:
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titlefilmnotes&columns=*%2C0%2C0&titleno=1341137&disp=Metrical+books++   


Brzozow

It is possible that at the beginning of the 17th century Jews started to settle down in Brzozów. That is why in 1676 the Bishop of Przemyśl Stanislaw Sarnowski issued a law forbidding Jews, heretic and schismatic to settle down. The documents show that in 1764 there were only 11 Jews, probably tax collectors, from Rymanowski Kahal (Jewish Kehilla administration).
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/brzozow/5,history/ 

http://www1.yadvashem.org/yv/en/about/institute/ghetto_encyclopedia.asp 

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosno.htm


Buchach

A district center

Photos, history and more at
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Buczacz (Buchach)

This town is now located in Ukraine
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities


Cemetery
The cemetery is unfenced and on a hillside, but there are probably over two hundred stones still standing. The inscriptions face away from the graves and usually do not have surnames but the reverse side often has first and last names and even dates. There are many stones broken and face down or otherwise illegible, the legible stones are the majority. The cemetery is only half of its original size and the approach road goes through the original site.

"Der Judisch Wecker"
"The Jewish Awakener" - "The Me'orer" (in Hebrew) a Yiddish weekly magazine published in Buczacz and Stanislawow from 1905-1907. It was first published in Stanislawow ( 29.9.1905) by the publisher Izik Widenfeld on his printing press. Starting in 1906 the publisher was Max Feffer, and it was edited by the writer Israel Rokach and his deputy (assistant) Shemuel Yosef Agnon. From 10.8.1906 the editorial board moved to Buczacz and printed in the printing press of Drettler. The last copy of the magazine was published in May 1907. There are translated excerpts from "The Me'orer" and a picture of its front page in the Yizkor book of Buczacz on JewishGen.

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/12601-rawnitzki-joshua-hayyim


Here is just one example of the insight this magazine offered into shtetl life:

"Forty-two teachers teach in the town (Buczacz) schools, and yet there are almost no Jewish teachers among them. And, after all, there are a number of young Jewish women in the town who have completed their studies to be teachers, and even so they can not get a teaching position in the town schools. And if they do obtain a teaching position, they are sent to some distant village in a rural area, where the pay is poor. The meager salary they receive is not enough even to pay for the most basic expenses. If they could get jobs in the town itself, they could subsist while eating at their parents' tables."

Although there once were some issues held in the repositories of Tel Aviv University, they have vanished. Somewhere in the world....maybe in a library....perhaps in private hands there are about 100 copies that could shed light on day by day life in Buczacz and Stanislawow, and by extension illuminate the tenor of turn-of-the-century shtetl life for all of our Galician ancestors, wherever they resided. If located, additional translations of this publication would be something that could be shared and posted online.

If you know of the existence and location of any copies...or suggestions of where to look, please contact me privately. If you have information of interest to the discussion group about the nature and value of this publication--from a genealogical standpoint--or know of the names of other who contributed to it, please share that with everyone. From a posting on 6/5/04 by Pamela Weisberger, Research Coordinator/Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@hotmail.com

Research
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Indexed records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns that are being indexed. Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

AGAD only houses the Supplemental Birth Register. This register includes only 44 delayed birth registrations for the years: 1849, 55, 59, 60, 63, 65, 66, 69, 71, 72 and 1875-89.


Budanov  (Budzaniv name changed in 1945 to Budaniv)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Bukaczowce

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns being indexed.
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/city/bukaczowce/


http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/town/bukaczowce.htm

Community
http://jewage.org/wiki/en/Profile:Bukaczowce_Ukraine

Holocaust
http://www1.yadvashem.org/yv/en/about/institute/killing_sites_catalog_
details_full.asp?region=Stanislawow


Burakuvla (Burakova)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Burshtyn   (Bursziyn, Burschtyn, Burshtin)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

A town in Halych district
http://www.worldcities.us/Burshtyn/


Busk

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Butsniv (Bucniew, Bucnow, Butsnev)

A village in the Ternopol district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Bykiv  (Novyy Bykiv Village)

Located in Sambir district.
http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/UKR-CHERNIGOV/2005-10/1130789623

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ukrchern/chernigov/geography/townsA-F.htm

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/overview-chernihivska-cemeteries-condition-information.html

http://www.heritageabroad.gov/Portals/0/documents/reports/survey_
ukraine_2005.pdf


   Map

http://drymba.net/en/map/1026777-novyy-bykiv-village

Names
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_born_in_Ukraine


http://en.efactory.pl/List_of_Ukrainians


Chmil'nyk (Chmelnik)

Before WW II, ten thousand Jews lived in the town of Chmelnik in the Vinnitsa district. They made up the majority of the population.  Jews had lived here for many years, from generation to generation, they were bound to the Ukrainians and Russians through friendship and love.
http://books.google.com/books?id=wvyX6Vjkq3MC&pg=PA22&lpg=PA22&dq=Chmelnik+Jew&source=
bl&ots=BM75ukKjVZ&sig=Dl-7wobnaFGvHoZDLiSJXc5onSg&hl=en#v=onepage&q=Chmelnik%20Jew&f=false

Names
http://www.hebrewsurnames.com/CHMIELNICKI

Pogroms
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/ukraine.html

http://www.jdate.com/jmag/2010/05/chmielnicki-pogroms/

http://www.aish.com/jl/h/cc/48952111.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact is Herbert Lazerow
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Chorowiec

Once in the sub-administrative Podgorze district within the main district of Wieliczka.

http://archive.wn.com/2008/05/18/1400/belaruspost/

Research
Birth, Marriage and Death records are located in the Krakow Branch of The Polish State Archives. For information on obtaining records from this archive, you will find that in Suzan Wynne's Book "Mizhhirya"
http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?gl=34&gsln=Chorowiec&gsln_x=XO


Books  
             

"Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia". 


Chortkov - (Czortkow, Czortkow)

A district center in Ternopol region of Eastern Galicia - site has information page, photos and more.
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Regional Special Interest Groups

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Cieplice

Cieplice lies in Jeleniognska Valley at the foot of the Karkonosze range, just 6 km from the centre of Jelenia Góra.

History
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/jelenia-gora/5,history/

Holocaust
http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/nazioccupation/sudetenland.html 

Yizkor Book
www.zchor.org/hitachdut/pinkas3.htm


Czaczow

The main district of Nowy Sacz, sub district Labowa. According to Suzan Wynne's book,
"Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia: A Resource Guide' which includes a complete list of LDS holdings for Galician Jewish records

http://www.geckogo.com/Guide/Poland/Malopolska-Region/Czaczow/Explore/Sights-Attractions/type/monument/

Records
Nowy Sacz/Labowa records
are not among them. However, LDS may have non-Jewish records for that district/sub district. The records were maintained by religious denominations under the Austrian government and, when the Poles agreed to provide LDS with films in the 1960, they chose to film very few Jewish districts. It was a time of intense anti-Semitism in Poland.

http://www.polishjews.org/places/001.htm


Czchów

Located near Brzesko (Brzesko district).  According to “The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life before and during the Holocaust”, an independent Jewish community in Czchów was constituted towards the end of the 19th century. At that time there were about 250 Jews in the town, many of whom remained in the sphere on influence of the tzadik dynasty from Nowy Sącz.
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Czch%C3%B3w/108065175887629?sk=info

Jewish Community
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/czchow/5,history/

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/city/czchow/


   Map

http://www.mapofpoland.net/Czchow,map.html

Records
The LDS Family History Center has a microfilm roll for Brzesko (b.1849-1886). Czchow is in the Brzesko district. The Czchow records are listed in the USC archives and in the Tarnow archives (1877-1893).
http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameResults.html?placeBirth=Czchow,%20%20Brzesko,%20%20Krakow,%20%20Poland&placeBirthType=LITERAL&language=en

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol3_00304.html


Czernowitz (Chernovitz, Chernovitsy)

Today’s city of Chernivtsi is located in the Ukraine. Throughout the past several centuries, the city’s name has corresponded to its ruling state’s nationality and language.

From 1778-1918, the city was apart of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and referred to by its
German Czernowitz, a name many Jews preferred to use through 1944, even as the city’s official name changed. With the break up of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy after
World War I, the city came under Romanian rule and Czernowitz became Cernauti. In June of 1940, the Soviet Union occupied the city. When Nazi Germany attacked the Soviet Union in 1941, during Operation Barbossa, it drove out the Red Army. Romanian troops and Nazi soldiers then occupied Cernauti and massacred the local Jewish population. After World War II, Cernauti became controlled by the Soviet Union and referred to by the Russian name Cernoutsi. After the Soviet Union dissolved, the city became apart of Ukraine in 1991 and has been referred to since by the Ukrainian name Chernivtsi.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/Popovici.html

Cemetery
http://jewishgraveyardrabbit.blogspot.com/2008/10/ukraine-czernowitz-cemetery.html

http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/newcemetery/oldproject/chrono.html

Czernowitz-L Discussion Group
http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/sadgura/czernlistserv.html

History
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/4838-czernowitz

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Czestochowa, (Poland)

Jews of Czestochowa
http://www.czestochowajews.org/docs/joc-brochure.pdf
 

Czestochowa  is a city in south Poland on the Warta River with 240,027 inhabitants (June 2009). It has been situated in the Silesian Voivodeship (administrative division) since 1999, and was previously the capital of Czestochowa Voivodeship (1975–1998). However, Czestochowa is historically part of Lesser Poland, not of Silesia, and before 1795 (see: Partitions of Poland), it belonged to the Kraków Voivodeship.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cz%C4%99stochowa

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html 

http://www.czestochowajews.org/

Cemetery
http://www.zchor.org/CZESTOCH.HTM

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=2222505

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/czestochowa/12,cemeteries/1854,the-jewish-cemetery-in-czestochowa/

Community
http://www.zchor.org/CZESLIST.HTM

Holocaust
http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/ghettos/czest.html


Dabrowa - (in Yiddish, Dombrov (n)(a) (Dombrau in German, Dabrow/Dabrowie (in Polish)

There are over 20 listed Dabrowa in partitioned Poland and are some are located in in these administrative districts: Dabrowa, Kalusz, Bochinia, Rzeszow, Nowy Sacz, Cieszanow and Chrzanow. There are also some tiny villages of the same name. One is Dabrowa Tarnowska, about 25 miles north of Tarnow.
http://galiciantraces.com/dabrowa-tarnowska/

http://www.imdb.com/search/name?birth_place=Dabrowa%20Tarnowska,%20Galicia,%20Austria-Hungary%20%5Bnow%20Dabrowa%20Tarnowska,%20Malopolskie,%20Poland%5D

http://www.jewish-guide.pl/shtetl/trips-to-shtetl

http://www.ipgs.us/iwonad/surnames/placesd.html


Debica

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Debno

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact is Elaine Rosenberg
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Delyatin (including Dora and Lanchin)

A shtetlach in the Carpathian area.

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html


Dobrachyn (Dobraczyn)

Once in Austria's Galicia province. It is now in L'viv
http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/PolandBorderSurnames/2000-01/0949296339

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Galicia_(Eastern_Europe)


Dobromil

Dobromil was once in Austria, later in Galicia and now in Ukraine.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_KUZ4XBbbkw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qT6fHpkdN5w&feature=related


Books  
             

"Dobromil"
Authored by Saul Miller and published in 1980 by Lowenthal Press, PO Box 1107, New York, NY 10009
ISBN 0-914382-01-2 LOC # 80-81470


Research
Land records are at the L'viv Archives for most of the 19th century. Przemysl Archives has a variety of records over many years beginning with 1870. Also, I am told, Jewish Birth, Marriage and Death records are also in the L'viv Archives. Fond 701, Series 1 contains "church books" of the Jewish Community in L'viv for the years 1785-1942 in 419 volumes. Dobromil is one of the communities covered, according to a posting by Bob Weiss
RWeissJGS@aol.com 

http://www.galiziengermandescendants.org/Data/Daum_Surnames/Dobromil
1784-1830.htm


"Dobromil Year Book"
has 83 pages in English and 50 pages in Yiddish by Saul Miller. The translation was by Leo Miller, PO Box 1107, New York, NY 10009.


Dolina - (Dolyna)

A village in Terebovlya district and west of Ivano Frankivsk

Cemetery
A grassy, unmarked, unfenced hillside. There are a handful of stones that are nearly completely buried.
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Dolina/cemetary-1.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Town information
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Dolzanka

Located in the Tarnopol District
http://www.ellisisland.org/search/viewTextManifest.asp?MID=00122962140060073792&pID=100819120714&lookup=100819120694

Holocaust
http://dailytrh.tripod.com/0722.html


Dormaradz

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosno.htm


Drohobycz (Drogobych, Drohobitch)- (Once in Eastern Galicia, now Drogobych, in Western Ukraine)

Today, located in the L'viv oblast in western Ukraine.

 
Deportation of Jews from Drohobych
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/drohobych.htm 

Drohobych

http://www.britannica.com/seo/d/drohobych/ 

Contact is Laurel E. White
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

Drohobycz Administrative District
Valerie Schatzker has offered an insight into the lifestyle of the Jews of the area and the petroleum industry

Drohobych District
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm 


Holocaust
Deportation of the Jews to Belzec death camp. Between 1942 and 1943, the Nazis deported 10,000 Jews from Drogobych to Belzec death camp. Of a prewar Jewish community of 15,000, only a few Jews survived.
http://motic.wiesenthal.com/gallery/pg19/pg3/pg19368.html 

Records

About 25,200 vital records are available at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw and will be indexed by JRI-Poland:

Births: 1877-1897
Marriages: 1877-1881, 1884-1897, (1886-1891, 1893-1897);
Deaths: 1852-1896

Included in the records for this Administrative center are the vital records for nearby smaller towns and villages. Contact the town leader for further information: Carole Glick Feinberg
feincgs@cs.com 

See also additional information at my
Ukrainian page

Records for the town of Drohobycz (film number 2405316) 
This film includes the following records (most records are handwritten in German in columns, some on plain ledger pages and some on printed form ledger pages with Latin or German headings
):

Book of Drohobycz birth records 1816-1833
Lists more than 1,800 births and includes date, house number, child's name, father's name and mother's first name (some also include father's occupation).

Books of Drohobycz birth records 1852-1857 and 1857-1869
List more than 4,000 births total and include all the information in the earlier records but add mother's maiden name and names of witnesses and some signatures. Many of these records also have notations written years later recording deaths and the civil marriage of the parents. There are notations written as late as 1940 on records from the 1850's. Information posted by Mark Jacobson

Book of Drohobycz death records 1816-1835
Lists more than 1,800 deaths.

Pages from the book of Drohobycz marriages, June 1935
Listing 36 marriages. These records are all in Polish.

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Dubie

Records
The FHC has microfilmed Dubie parish records.

http://www.jewishgalicia.net/website/modules/database/Item.aspx?pid=407&type=9&id=384

http://www.en.galiciajewishmuseum.org/

Cemetery
Solotvin Cemetery

http://www.jewishgalicia.net/Database/Solotwin%20Cemetery%20List.aspx


Dubna

Located in the Carpathian Mountains and located near Skole.
http://search.geshergalicia.org/towns.php

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets/kre054.html

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/index/Page-5.html


Dubienko

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/strzyzow/strzyzow.htm


Dukla

Krosno District, Lwów Province.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/zmigrod/zmigrod.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Dzvenyhorod  (Dzvenigorod)

A village in the Borshchiv district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Felshtin  (Gvardeyskoye, Felshtin)

Prior to WW II it was located in Ukraine's Podolia region and is currently known as Gvardeyskoye.

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Felsztyn  (Skelevka)

Prior to WW II it was located in the Sambor district, Eastern Galicia. Currently known as Skelevka

http://felsztyn.tripod.com/id6.html

http://www.jewishgalicia.net/website/modules/database/Item.aspx?pid=407&type=9&id=117

http://www.deathcamps.org/belzec/galiciatransportlist.html


Frysztak

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Glinyany (Gliniany)

Research
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed. This town is now located in Ukraine.

Births: 1860-1893
Deaths: 1877-1898

Indices
Created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw

http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Golagory (Gologury)

Records
The
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. Town Leader is Michael Miller.

Birth Indices
Online and searchable. Death Indices will be added in the future.

Births: 1876-1881, 1883-1894, 1897-1900
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Gorlice

There is an updated web site at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/gorlice/gorlice.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html


Gorodenka (Horodenka, Gorodenker)

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/gorodenka/

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html

Research
http://www.jewishgalicia.net/Gallery/Views%20of%20Horodenka.aspx

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodenka/gor503.html

Gorodenker Memorial Book
Quite a bit of information available here
http://resources.ushmm.org/hsv/source_view.php?SourceId=17941


Gorodnitsa

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Gorodok

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Grimaylov

Cemetery
The cemetery is located in a residential area today. It is small, open, overgrown and gives no indication that it is a cemetery site. There is a memorial there consisting of a wooden stake with a small sign that reads "To victims of Fascism". The sign is on the ground.

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Grodek Jagiellonski - (Gorodek)

Records
The
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. Town Leader is Mike Kalt.

All of the vital records available at AGAD are indexed and on-line and include
Births: 1870-1876, 1886-1892; Deaths: 1877-1890

http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Gross Moster (now Velikiye Mosty)

Now in Ukraine

Research
http://records.ancestry.com/Anna_Haberkorn_records.ashx?pid=123610521

http://www.avotaynu.com/books/DJSGNames.htm


Gusyatin

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Gwozdziec (Gwozdziec Miasto, Gvozdets)

This town is now located in Ukraine.

Research
Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available. All the records available at AGAD are now on-line including Births for: 1858, 1863, 1870

http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Halych (Halicz, Galicz, Galic, Galich)

This is the name of the old capital of Galicia district with a population of about 12,000

Halych monuments and history; Krylos - ancient village nearby Halych and part of ancient Halych in Halych district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Horodenka (see Gorodenka)


Hotin

Regional Special Interest Groups 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Husiatyn - (Gusyatin)

Research
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. All the records available at AGAD are on-line.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

Births: 1815-1816, 1818-1876
Marriages: 1826, 1851-1852, 1856-1858, 1865-1876

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/suchostaw/sl_husiatyn.htm

Landmanschaften
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/suchostaw/sl_husiatyn.htm


Ivana - Puste (Iwana Puste)

A village in Borshchiv district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Ivano Frankivsk (Ivano Frankovsk, Stanislawow, Stanisle)

Ivano Frankivsk and Skala (Skala Podolskaya) were two important Jewish towns in eastern Galicia before WW II. Both of these Galician administrative centers are part of the JRI-Poland AGAD vital records indexing project. As administrative centers, smaller nearby towns and villages registered their vital events at these larger towns.

Before WW II, approximately half of Stanislawow's population was Jewish. In 1931, the Jewish population was close to 25,000 and by 1939 it was about 30,000. After the completion of the census and the start of WW II, a large influx of refugees from the West occurred. In addition, the Nazis herded the Jewish residents of surrounding towns into Stanislawow and murdered them as well as most of those Jewish residents of Stanislawow who did not flee to the East. Only about 1,000 - 1,500 of Stanislawow's pre WWII Jewish residents survived the war, and most of them escaped prior to the Nazi occupation. Therefore, the 1939 census represents the most accurate accounting of Stanislawow's pre-war Jewish population. From a posting by Shelly Pollero

Note: not to be confused with Ivano-Frankovov located in Ukraine. The two towns are 81 miles or 130.3 kilometers apart from each other.


Books  
             

"History of the Jewish People in Stanislawow"
Authored by N. M. Gelber is being translated - (the first chapter is 58 pages).

This includes the Table of Contents and the Index. The index contains individual names.
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stanislawow-arim/stanislawow- arim.html

Landsmanshaftn
18 Landsmanshaft plots for Stanislawow, Galicia has been cataloged by Ada Green
ada.Green@postoffice.worldnet.att.net  Names of the burials in the two First Janower plots are listed
http://home.att.net/~AdaGalicia/janow.htm 

List of Names of the burials in the two First Janower plots http://home.att.net/~AdaGalicia/janow.htm 

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Research
AGAD Archives in Warsaw houses many vital records including:
Stanisiawow:
Births: 1864-74, 1877-99
Marriages: 1872-76, 1889-97
Deaths: 1863-87, 1886-90


Jagielnica

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Jaryczow Nowy

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed. This town is now located in Ukraine.

Research
All the records available at AGAD are on-line and include:

Births: 1888-1890, 1892, 1893, 1896, 1897
Marriages: 1879, 1892, 1897
Deaths: 1879-1881, 1883, 1889-1892, 1899

Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Jasienica Rosielna

There is a ShtetLinks page at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosno.htm


Jaslo

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosno.htm


Jentel

Now located in the Czech Republic

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Jews_from_Galicia_(Eastern_Europe) 


Jezupola


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Located about 7 miles from Stanislawow, now Ivano-Frankivsk.

http://www26.us.archive.org/stream/historyofgreatwar03buch/history
ofgreatwar03buch_djvu.txt


Kalush

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 


Kamenka Bugskaya - Kamenka

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Kamionka Strumilowa (name changed from Kam'ianka Strumilova in 1944 to Kam'ianka Buz'ka)

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/town/kamionka_strumi.htm


Kaminetz-Podolsky (Kamenets-Podolsk)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Judith Sharon
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Kanczuga

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Kazimierz

Research
Judaica Foundation
The Center for Jewish Culture In Kazimierz
Krakow 31-058 KRAKOW
ul. Rabina Meiselsa 17.
Phone: 004812 23 55 95, 23 55 87 Fax: 23 50 34


Khodoriv (Chodorow, Khodorov)

Located in the Bobrka District, Lwów Province - it is now a town in Zhydachiv district.
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Khorostkov

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Khrystynopil' (Name changed in 1951 to Chervonograd)


Kibliltch

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Alfred Feller

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Klyuvintsky

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Knihynieze

This shtetl had 689 Jews living there while it was within Galicia.


Kolbuszowa

List of over 300 Jews who left Kolbuszowa for Ellis Island 1899-1923 in Excel format is available by contacting Harvey Kaplan harvey@hkaplan.freeserve.co.uk
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/gorlice/gorlice.htm

This web site covers all shtetlach within approximately a 30 mile radius of Kolbuszowa (Galicia, now Poland) and includes these Administrative Districts: Kolbuszowa, Lancut, Mielec, Nisko, Pilzno, Ropczyce, Rzeszow, Strzyzow and Tarnobrzeg.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/ 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact is Susana Leistner Bloch

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Kobylolowki

Located in west Ukraine border area south of Ternopol and about 22.8 miles from Satanow


Kolomyia  (Kolomea, Kolomiya, Kolimia, Kolimeya, Kolomai, Kolomey, Kolomyia, Kolomaya)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

This was one of the most important Jewish centers in Galicia and one of 87 Administrative towns included in the JRI-Poland AGAD project. It is located in the western part of Ukraine and was an important Jewish town in Eastern Galicia, prior to WW II. The town name has many variations in spellings depending on the country that was ruling at the time, as well as ethnic variations. Kolomea (German); Kolomyya (Ukrainian); Kolomyja (Polish) Further information can be found
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/kolomea/kolomad.htm 

Holocaust
Bettina Brenner's site:
http://www.history.ucsb.edu/faculty/marcuse/dachau.htm 

A list of holocaust survivors who previously resided in Kolomea
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/kolomea/kolomad 

Chapters on districts of Kolomyja and Stryy from the dissertation Emergence of Genocide in Galicia and resettlement transports to Belzec extermination camp
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

"On the Shoah of Kolomyja" (related with Belzec extermination camp), there is the very precise research of Robin O'Neil at
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/galicia/gal003.html 

Regional Special Interest Groups
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/ukraine.html 


Research
The AGAD Archives houses nearly 40,000 Kolomyia vital records covering the following years:

Births: 1865 - 1899
Marriages: 1877 -1899
Deaths: 1865-1894, 1898-1899

Included in the records for this Administrative center are 38,500 vital records for nearby smaller towns and villages. The Town Leader Alan Weiser
alanboy@erols.com  The marriage and death records are available. None of the Kolomyia records have index pages.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadcontrib.htm

The Kolomyia Research Group
List of those historic events which affected Jewish life in Kolomyia especially, and in Galicia, in general, from earliest times through at least WW II and hopefully to present times. The first draft of "Dateline of Events" is at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/kolomea/kdateline.htm 


Kolomyia Administrative District

A list of towns comprising the KAD, with variations in spellings and map coordinates
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/kolomea/kolomad.htm 


Komarno

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed. This town is now located in Ukraine.

Records
Birth and death records have been indexed, but not all the indices have yet been added to the database. Town Leader is Israel Pickholtz
zach4v6@actcom.co.il

These indices are on the on-line database:
Births: 1878-1879, 1883-84, 1888-1890
Deaths: 1876, 1878-1884, 1889-1891

Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Konyushki


Kopychintsy

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Kopyczynce

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed.


Korolowka

There are four - one was located in Tarnopol, and three in Stanislawow regions.


Korolowka, Powiat (district) Borszczow (Borshchev), Tarnopol (Ternopil) Province

Late 19th century vital records (those 100 years old and older) for Borshchiv are located in Warsaw's AGAD Archives. AGAD Archives Galicia data is currently the subject of JRI-P AGAD Initiative Project.

With the notable exception of Korolowka near Borshchev, a large shtetl with over 3,000 general population, the rest of the Korolowka (s) in Stanisiawow region were rather small villages having general population of about 1,000 people each.

Holocaust
The story about the Jews from Korolowka, who survived the Holocaust by hiding almost a year in caves, appears in the June 2004 issue of the National Geographic Adventure magazine
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/

Research
1. Newer than 100 years vital records are located in Warsaw Archives known as USC
    Warszawa Srodmiescie or Archiwa Zabuzanski.

2. Korolowka, Powiat (district) Kolomyja (Kolomyya), Stanisiawow (Ivano-Frankivsk)
    Province

3. Korolowka (Korolevka) Powiat (district) Tlumacz, Stanisiawow (Ivano-Frankivsk)
    Province

4. Olejowo-Korolowka (Oleyeva-Korolevka) at 4845-2522, Powiat (district) Horodenka,
    (Gorodenka) Stanislawow (Ivano-Frankivsk) Province.


Korczyna

A sub district within Krosno

Holocaust
http://evagaller.wordpress.com
 
(In Hebrew)

Surname List
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/zmigrod/zmigrodduklagen.htm


Kosov

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Kovel

Regional Special Interest Groups

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Kozel'nyky (Absorbed into L'viv)


Kozienice

Many of the vital records were filmed by the Mormons from 1826-1877.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/


Krakow (Kroke, Crakow)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Kremenets

Now in Ukraine.

Research
These web sites contains some general information including Kremenets records, and updates on the progress of the Shtetl Co-Op
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/kmain.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Krempna

There were 42 Jews living in this shtetl when it was located in Galicia


Krivoluka

Regional Special Interest Groups 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Krosno

Today, Krosno is a major town and the center of dozens of smaller towns in southern Poland and was a part of Galicia, an Imperial Province of Austria Hungary from 1776 to 1919 when it was returned to Poland. It is 45 miles west of Przemysl and 180 miles south of Warsaw.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosno.htm
 
http://www.fotw.net/flags/pl-pk-ks.html 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krosno 

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/dukla-wojewodstwo-krosno.html 

Holocaust
http://www.ejewish.info/resources/resourceSearchResults.aspx?sText=Ghettos%20(Holocaust)&keywordid=78&rsid=0 

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 

Research
http://homepage.mac.com/lizurd/genealogy_other/bookmarks/sanok.html  


Kryvche (Krivichi, Krywcze, Krivche, Krivichi)

A village in the Borshchiv district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Kudryntsi (Kudrynce, Kudrintsy)

A village in the Borshchiv district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns indexed.


Kuty

   
 
  http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Lanchin

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 


Lancut

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Lanovtse

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html


Lezajsk (Lizhensk)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Sarah and Stephen Katz
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Lipica Gorna

This shtetl had 71 Jews while it was in Galicia.


Lipowice

Located southeast of Dolina


Lubaczow

A small village in the southeastern corner of Poland. In 1931, there were 6,291 residents, of which 1,794 were Jews. There is a wonderful web site entitled "Remembering the Jews of Lubaczow" offered by Eva Floersheim where you can read, under the title "Religious Life", a text "Learning about the Gravestones from Lubaczow"
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lubaczow/

"A Beginner's Tutorial"
Here you will find under different sections with English explanations and Hebrew texts; Introduction; The Stone; Two Small Letters in Hebrew; Decorations; The Hebrew Calendar - A Mini Dictionary; The Hebrew Language; The End. The text is based on the gravestones photographed at the Jewish cemetery in Lubaczow by Howard Bodenstein in 1999
http://members.nbci.com/_XMCM/lubaczow/bgntut.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Lublin - Radom, Lublin and Sandomierz

Annexed to Austria during the third partition, in the Vienna Congress, they were integrated into the Congress Poland Autonomy ruled by the Czar. They were part of Austria for only 20 years, from 1795 to 1815.


Luboml

In October, 1941, this village disappeared from the face of the earth. Nazi storm troopers occupied the shtetl of more than 4,000 Jews who were systematically massacred and then buried in mass graves.

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Luka (Ozerne) 

A village (at one time located in Bukovina) near (4.5 miles) Sambir and 3 miles south of Drogobych. It was renamed to Ozerne after WW II. It lays south of impenetrable mud lands nearby. In 1880, the village had a population of 695 in the rustic part and 349 in noble part and there were also 66 residents of the manor or castle that belonged to the Lutsks family. The word rustic refers to peasantry, from the Latin word 'rusticus'.

Two rich Jews were known to live here: Diamandshein, known in the village as Yos'ko and Kiva. Further information can be found in Michael Volodymyr Skoryk's story on page 11.
http://members.ozemail.com.au/~retengnr/m_v_skormem.html 


Books  


                        
"Memoirs of a Galician Jewish Family from Luka"
A bit difficult to read the 'broken' English, but it gives you an idea of life during WW II in the Luka Ghetto in Boryslav where the Jews were taken

http://members.tripod.com/~Gurnicht/luka.htm


Lukov (Maciejow)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


L'viv (Lwow)

Lviv is in Galitzia (Halychyna in Ukrainian, Galitsiya in German-Austrian). It is the largest city in Ukrainian Halychyna (Galitzia) an ancient city of about 1,000,000 inhabitants.  If you look at a map of Ukraine, in the west you will find three oblasts (provinces); Lviv-ska, Ivano-Frankivsk-a, and Ternopil-ska.  That is Halychyna.  The Lviv oblast is mostly Boiko area.  Boikos are a "tribe", that is linguistic-cultural subdivision of Ukrainian nation.  Boiks were famous in Ukraine for their skills as architects (wooden churches), wood carvers, etc.

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Cemetery
The only cemetery which exists is post Holocaust. The tombstones are largely in Cyrillic. 15 volunteers have been working diligently on a project that will create a searchable data base of persons that died in the Jewish Hospital in the city of L'viv for years 1941/42.

The list has some 9000 surnames, given names, age, dates of death and burial, last known address, plot and tomb numbers and costs associated with their burial. To date some 6000 line items have been entered. This project is part of the joint agreement between Yad Vashem and JewishGen. A portion of the 1941 sheets are written in Cyrillic and represent some 1200 surnames. Further information may be obtained from Errol Schneegurt
ESLVIV@aol.com 

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

Research
The AGAD Archives in Warsaw houses many of the 19th century vital records including:

60,699 Births: 1814-1837, 1862-1899
4,752 Marriages: 1870-1899
36,957 Deaths: 1864-1899

Josef Herz
josef@jaherz.com  is the Town Leader of this JRI-Poland project

JRI-Poland Project for Lemberg/Lwów includes a list of towns in the Lwów Administrative area
http://lwow.jaherz.com/ 

Rabbi Ronald Lubofsky of Australia, owns the 3 volumes of census records for L'viv. Microfilmed Jewish community metrical records for the towns of Brody, Brzezany, and Lwow (Lemberg) held in the Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine in L'viv, have been added to the LDS-Family History Library Catalog. This means that (for a small mailing fee) researchers can order copies of these films to be sent to their local Family History Centers, where they can view images of the actual records, or view them in Salt Lake City at the FHL -- although film requests may take a few days.

These birth, marriage and death records cover (with some gaps) the following years:
The Jewish Congregation, Brody, 1815-1871;
 
Jewish Congregation Brzezany, 1820-1864;

Jewish Congregation Lwow, 1801-1889.

For details, here is the link to the film information:
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titlefilmnotes&columns=*%2C0%2C0&titleno=1343978&disp=Metrical+books++   


Lvovo (Lvowo)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Lysiec

Cemetery
There are probably a hundred or more standing tombstones at various angles. The cemetery is fenced. There are a handful of stones with surnames. Inscriptions face away from the graves and the reverse sides are eroded. There is one grave that indicates the date of 1815.


Lyubar

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact
Ellen Shindelman
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Magdalowka


Malow (Maliv)

Located near Terebovlya.


Maniava

 
  http://jgaliciabukovina.net/134976/gallery/maniava


Mielec

Located in western Galicia

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html
 


Mielnica (Melnitsa Podolskaya)

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing
Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns being indexed. This town is now located in Ukraine.

Birth, Marriage and Death Records have been indexed, but not all the indices have been added to the database.
Births: 1878-1879, 1883-1884, 1888-1890
Marriages: 1877-1898
Deaths: 1851-1895

Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available

http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Mikolajow

1.  A statistical study by Volodymyr Kubijovyc published in 1983 provides estimated population for all ethnic groups based primarily on the 1931 census extrapolated to January 1, 1939.  The extrapolation is based on several others sources explained in his study.

Full reference:  ?Kubijovyc, Volodymyr.  Ethnic groups of the South-Western Ukraine (Halychyna - Galicia) 1.1.1939. 1983. Wiesbaden, Germany. Otto Harrassowitz. Text in Ukrainian (Cyrillic) and English languages. Statistical tables and indexes in Ukrainian (Cyrillic), Ukrainian (transliterated), and Polish languages. 175 pages.

2.  The official published statistical report whose title is usually known in short form as the "Gemeindelexikon der Galizien" was published in 1907 and was "the" compiled result of the 1900 Austrian census. Full reference:   ?K.K. statistischen Zentralkommission. Gemeindelexikon der im Reichsrate vertretenen Königreiche und Lander: Bearbeitet auf Grund der Ergebnisse der Volkszahlung vom 31. Dezember 1900. Bd 12: Galizien. 1907. Wien (Vienna), Austria. German language. 1024 pages. Index.

Mikolajow (Zydaczow dist.)
   454  (1900 census, Gemeindelexikon)
   498  (1921 census, WOWW)
   559  (1931 census, Pinkas HaKehillot)
   600  (est. 1939, Kubijovyc)

Mikolajow (Bobrka dist.)
   314  (1900 census, Gemeindelexikon)
     n/a  (1921 census, WOWW)
   315  (1931 census, Pinkas HaKehillot)
   300  (est. 1939, Kubijovyc)

Mikolajow (Radziechow dist.)
     60  (1900 census, Gemeindelexikon)
     n/a  (1921 census, WOWW)
     n/a  (1931 census, Pinkas HaKehillot)
     50  (est. 1939, Kubijovyc)

I hope that this provides at least some indication of the relative Jewish population of Mikolajow (Radziechow dist.) and perhaps some interesting or useful data for other time periods for all three places. From a posting by Brian J. Lenius with some information provided by Alexander Sharon


Mikulintsy (Mykulyntsi, Mikulince)

A village in Terebovlia district. The town information page is at
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Mitvina

A shtetlach in the Carpathian area.


Mizhhirya (Mezhgorye)

A village in the Borshchiv district

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Monastyriska (Monastrische)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact is Cynthia Stern
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Mosciska

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns being indexed.


Mukacsevo (Munkacs)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Nadvornaya (Nadvirna, Nadvorna, Nadworna)

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
has records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed.

There is a ShtetLinks Page created by David Sotkowitz and Ada Green
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Nadvorna/nadw.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Narayiv (Narajow)

A village in Berezhany district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Nemirov

Located north of Breslov.

Research
There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives


Nesterov (See Zhovkva)


Nezhin

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact is Alfred Feller
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Nizhnev

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Susannah R. Juni
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Nizniow

Cemetery
There is a cemetery and it is located up a hill making accessibility a bit difficult. There is little left.
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/cadastral_maps_and"_landowners_project
/records.php
 


Nowy Sacz

http://miasta.gazeta.pl/krakow/1,42699,5121325.html 

http://www.diapozytyw.pl/en/site/slady_i_judaica/nowy_sacz 

http://www.nowysacz.pl/eng/?main=inc-buildings


Obertin (Obertyn)

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
has records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns indexed.


Odessa

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Okopy (Okupy, Okapi)

A village in the Borshchiv district - This town is now located in Ukraine.
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Records
All vital records are indexed and include:
Marriages: 1854, 1867-1876

Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Osiek

During the Galician period, this shtetl had 257 Jews


Ostrah  (See Ukrainian Shtetls )


Ostropol (Osterpolye)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact is Martin Horwitz
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Ottynia

  
http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Ozeryany (Jezierzany)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Palashevka

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Pavoloch (Pavolitch)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Pereginsky

A shtetlach in the Carpathian area.


Perehinsko

Cemetery
The cemetery is about the size of a good-sized house and yard and is fenced in. All the stones are broken off at the base. Many Jews from this shtetl were buried in neighboring Rozniatow.


Peremyshlany (Peremyshlany, Przemyslany, Pyeryemyshlyant, Peremyshl' in Ukraine)

District center in L'viv. Town information and List of Villages of Peremyshlyan, Kamyanka Buska (Kamionka Strumilowa/Kamenka Bugskay, Radekhiv (Radziechow/Radekhov) districts at
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

The site offers an information page on the town, two pages of recent photos and a list of villages of Peremyshlany, Kayanka Buska (Kamionka Strumilowa/Kamenka Bugskaya) (Radziechow/Radekhov) districts.

The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book "The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 18th Century" by M. J. Rosman amounted to 789.


Pidhaitsi

  

   http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities


Pidvysoke (Podwysokie, Podwysoke, Podvysokoye)

A village in the Berezhany district. At this site , you will find village information, views, etc.
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Pistyn (Pystin)

Located 13 miles south of Kolomyya/Kolomea (Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast) and about 4 miles northwest of Kosov/Kossow. This town was in the Kossow district in 19th century Galicia. There are no vital records available according to Mark Halpern on the Gesher Galicia SIG


Plotycha (Plotycze, Plotycza)

A village in Ternopol district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Podhajce - (Podgavtsy)

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
has records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns.

Births and Marriage records are available at AGAD
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

Deaths: 1896, 1898, 1899
Deaths (Index Only); 1879-1882, 1884, 1887, 1893-1895

Index only entries are extracted from indices and the underlying records are not available and cannot be ordered from AGAD


Podkamen

There were 118 Jews living here while the shtetl was part of Galicia

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Podwoloczyska (Podwoloczyska, Podwolochisk, Polvochisk)

There are some postcard reproductions of places in Podwolochisk in Gerard Sylvain and Henri Minczeles, "Yiddishland," published by Ginkgo Press, 1999. But the book, lacks an index, so a search for those pictures has to be made by leafing through this fat book of over 500 pages and squinting at each of its very tiny captions. There is one picture which shows a group of men seated outside an open-air restaurant near the village and another showing the village's "Ulica Kolejowa" street with Blumenfeld's store. There are a couple more views in the book. From a posting by Naomi Fatouros

Yizkor Book


Polonnoye

Regional Special Interest Groups


Pomortsy

Regional Special Interest Groups 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Popiel

A village in Drohobycz county, presently in the Ukraine and about 6 miles from Boryslaw in Eastern Galicia. Popiel is in the Dnestr basin, on the banks of Ratoczyna river. The village buildings are located in the middle of the area in the Katowice Valley and encompass several hamlets. For further descriptive information refer to the Archives of Gesher Galicia SIG at galicia@lyris.jewishgen.org  and click your way to March 3, 2000 and Alexander Sharon's description.
http://members.tripod.com/krolpopiel/ 


Priluki

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Probuzhna

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Przemysl (Pshemishyl)

In 1882, Przemysl was located in Austria-Hungary in the Kronland (Province) of Galicia in the province of Rzeszow. Later it became located in Poland. JewishGen lists this town under the Guberniya of Galicia, Poland in the province of Rzeszow. Before WW I, Galicia was part of Austria and several partitions occurred in the 1700s and 1800s.

Research
Indexing of all available records (44,161 index entries) in the Przemysl branch of the Polish State Archives is available. Information obtained from the archives of the Przemysl Urzad Stanu Cywilnego (Town Civil Records Office). The earliest birth register started in 1789 up to 1899. See the JRI-Poland web site for details on how to access this database.

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Przysucha

Przysucha

http://www.diapozytyw.pl/en/site/slady_i_judaica/Przysucha 

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/481399/Pshishkhah-Hasidism  

http://asimplejew.blogspot.com/2008/11/summarizing-przysucha.html  


Radom - (Radom, Lublin and Sandomierz)

Annexed to Austria during the third partition, in the Vienna Congress they were integrated into the Congress Poland Autonomy ruled by the Czar. They were part of Austria for only 20 years, from 1795 to 1815.


Radomysl (Radomysl Wielki)  See also my Ukrainian Shtetl page

Once was in Galicia. Since the end of World War I it has belonged to Poland.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/Radomysl%20wielki/radomysl1.html


Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Susana Leistner Bloch or Jonathan Ansell
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Radymno (Radimno, Redem)

It was once a part of Western Galicia, but now Poland in the Jaroslaw Administrative District. It is 11.7 miles north of Przemysl and 8.2 miles SE of Jaroslaw.
http://www.zolynia.org/roundup.html 

http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/town/radymno.htm 

http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/ev/zasoby.html 


Rafalovka

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Ray (Raj, Rai)

A village in Berezhany district (Potocki palace, 1709) http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Rijeka (Fiume)

At one time, before WW 1, Fiume was located in Modrus-Fiume County in Austro- Hungary.  It was an emigration point for Hungarian and Croatian Jews.  It is now known as Rijeka and is in the Republic of Croatia. 
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=186&letter=F


Rohatyn - (Rogatin)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Rohatyn had 3,113 Jews living here during the Galicia period. An excellent and informative web page, includes photographs
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rohatyn/rohatyn.htm

http://www.tisharon.org/Remember/Communities/Rohatyn.htm 

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/rohatyn.htm  

Records

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns.

All the records available at AGAD are now on-line.

Deaths: 1877-1886
Deaths (Index Only): 1887-1898

Index only entries are extracted from indices and the underlying records are not available and cannot be ordered from AGAD

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

Yizkor Book
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rohatyn/rohatyn.htm 

http://resources.ushmm.org/Holocaust-Names/List-Catalog/display/details.php?type=nlcat&id=140520&ord=23 
 
http://www.library.yale.edu/judaica/site/collection/yizkorbooks.php 


The Rohatyn Yizkor Book
briefly states that some 575 adult Jewish males were suddenly arrested in the spring of 1915 as suspected German spies and marched off for detention within Russia. They were held for some time in Chembar (now known as Belitsky) which was in Penza Provence; then eventually sent back as far as Ternopol where they were further detained until 1917 until a smaller group of those who had not by then perished were allowed to return to Rohatyn.


Romaniolo Siolo

If you have any information on this shtetl, please let me know so it can be shared on this site


Romanovka

Located near Berdichev. It has another name today and is located in Ukraine.

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Romanowe Siolo

http://www.kresy.co.uk/galicja_admin_districts.html 

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Ropczyce

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact is Susana Leistner Bloch or Jonathan Ansell
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Rovno

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Rozdol - (Rozdul, Rosdil, Rozdo and (particularly in older Jewish sources Rozla)

Rozdol administrative sub-district of Stanislawow for 1869 to1900 A very informative (East Galicia) web site:
http://www.rozdol.htm

Cemetery
The cemetery is large and fenced in and has quite a few stones which are broken, face down and otherwise illegible. No surnames could be found.

Records
Census records
From 1801, 1819 and 1826 are owned by Israel Pickholtz
zach4v6@actcom.co.il  and he is willing to look up specific names.

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Has records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed.

Names List
A printed list of Pages of Testimony was given to Yad Vashem for people born in or lived in Rozdol. The 280 name list offers name and place of residence. Nothing else. Israel Pickholtz offers to answer individual questions.
Zach4v6@actcom.il

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Rozhnyatov

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Rozniatow

Cemetery
The cemetery is fairly large with a couple of hundred stones, many at precarious angles. The area is partially fenced and contains quite a few trees, which disturb both the stones and access to them. The inscriptions face away from the graves and are often fairly legible, but do not include surnames.


Rozwadow

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Susana Leistner Bloch or Jonathan Ansell

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Rymanow

Rymanow today is in southern Poland but was in Galicia, an Imperial Province (Kronland) of Austria-Hungary from 1776 to 1919

Cemetery
There is a Society dedicated to preserving the Jewish heritage - Spotkanie-Rymanow.

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosnorym.htm 

Synagogue
There is work being done to restore the beautiful old synagogue.

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosno.htm


Rzepnik

http://ceciliawoloch.blogspot.com/2005/05/lost-found.html 

http://spuscizna.org/spuscizna/odrzykon.html 


Rzeszow (Reisha)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Sadgura

Memoirs on the Sadgura ShtetLinks web site recalling life in Sadgura (Bukovina) and Chotin (Ukraine) in the early 1900s. Jack (Yankel) Becker tells the story of his early years in this 1974 oral history - interview with his daughter, Elizabeth

See also my
Ukrainian - Romanian pages

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Sambor (Sambir) Ukraine

The founding date of the Jewish community was the 15th century. There were about 8.000 Jews in the area, before the Holocaust. Between the "Aktionen" and deportations to Belzec, they wiped out the community. This town is now located in Ukraine.

Records
Records for Sambor (now Sambor, Ukraine) are available at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw and indexed by JRI-Poland.
Births: 1862-1883, 1885-1897;
Marriages: 1877-1897;
Deaths: 1868-1883, 1887-1894

Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

Another informational site for Sambor

http://motic.wiesenthal.com/albums/malbum/m15/a0770m2.html 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact is Laurel White 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html

See also my
Ukrainian site for additional information by clicking here Ukraine


Sandomierz

Radom, Lublin and Sandomierz were annexed to Austria during the third partition, in the Vienna Congress they were integrated into the Congress Poland Autonomy ruled by the Czar. They were part of Austria for only 20 years, from 1795 to 1815.


Sanok

Jewish Genealogy to go to my Poland web page


Sapohiv (Sapogow, Sapogiv, Sapogov)

A village in Borshchiv district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Sasow (Sasov)

This town is now located in Ukraine. Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

Records
All the records have been indexed:
Births: 1862-1880
Deaths: 1859-1876, 1879-1881, 1882-1895

Yad Vashem
Will copy most Yizkor Books in their possession and Howard Verb is willing to share the pertinent information he finds in the copy of the book he has with any of you.

HVerb@compuserve.com


Satanov

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Sedziszow

Sedziszow (pronounced sehn zhee shuff) (Sedziszow Malopolski, Sendeshov, Sendishev, Sendziszov, Shendeshov) Located near Ropczyce and just west of Rzeszow.


Seletin

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact is Norah Schdorf

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Semyatichi (Semiematichi)


Shargorod

A town in Vinnitsa oblast, Ukrainian SSR An organized Jewish community existed there from the latter half of the 17th century.


Books  
             

"The Podolian Shtetl as Architectural Phenomenon"
The author, Alla Sokolova, describes the general layout of the town and discusses the architecture and interiors of many of the buildings she visited. Contact Yackov & Lena Berkun


"The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock.


"The Shtetl: Image and Reality"
Edited by Gennady Estraikh and Mikhail Krutikov and published by The University of Oxford in 2000


Other sites that mention this town include:
http://motlc.wiesenthal.com/text/x29/xm2995.html

http://home.comset.net/adainlo/eng-ukrain.htm

http://www.ort.spb.ru/friend/pju/arh_online_e.htm 


Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Siedliska

There are a least three Siedliska and one Siedliska Bogusz - all located within what used to be Austria and/or Galicia: JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker lists around 28 towns in Poland with this name:
Siedliska near Jaworow
Siedliska near Przemysl
Siedliska near Rzeszow
Siedliska Bogusz west of Przemysl
http://www.pgst.org/places/siedliska_bogusz.htm 


Skala Podilska (Skala Podolska, Skala Podolskaya)

A town in the Borshchiv district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Records
AGAD Archives in Warsaw houses many vital records including
Births 1872-82, 1886-97
Deaths: 1839-92

The Skala Benevolent Society (Skala Podolaska)
has a video "Skala on the Border" which gives a history of this Jewish community from the 15th century through the holocaust. For further information contact Tony Hausner
tthausner@yahoo.com 

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Skalat (G)

Formerly in Galicia (Austro-Hungary), then Poland, and now in Ukraine. It was home to a large Jewish population, and even more families lived in the surrounding villages and towns, according to an article by Schelly Talalay Dardashti in The Jerusalem Post
http://www.jpost.com/Editions/2002/01/03/JewishWorld/JewishWorld.
41063.html
 

History of Skalat
Includes information from the 1971 Skalat Yizkor book, and a list of members researching families from Skalat
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Skalat/skalat.html  

A visit to the Skalat Holocaust Memorial in the Holon Cemetery, which can be viewed from the Skalat site at SRRG. The page for the memorial is labeled "New". You'll also find a 'Trip Report' including photos.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Skalat/Skalat.html  

Landsmanshaftn
The Skalaters Association in Israel
Dedicated a memorial consisting of Jewish gravestones that had been used as building material, in July 2002. This memorial was constructed in a corner of the former cemetery now being used by a nearby school as a soccer field. At the edge of the soccer field, there is some fifteen gravestones, neatly stacked. There is also a Holocaust memorial outside the town. This memorial includes about twenty gravestones that had been taken from the cemetery, standing around the central memorial. So that the stones would all be of the same height, some were cut at the bottoms, where the names appeared. Further information can be obtained from
Haim Braunstein
03 618 3213 or
40 Hibat Zion
Ramat Gan 52408, Israel.

Regional Special Interest Groups:
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

Synagogue
There is a 'synagogue' which had been turned into a warehouse and is deserted now.

Travel
"A Visit To Skalat"
For an accurate first person description and for an amazing collection of area community records,
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL 

Yizkor Book
"Skalat; Kovets Zikaron Le-Kehila she-Harva ba-Shoa"
http://resources.ushmm.org/Holocaust-Names/List-Catalog/display/details.php?type=nlcat&id=140520&ord=23


Sniatyn

Now located in Ukraine.

Holocaust
Most of the Jews were sent to Belzec Camp by the Nazis in April, 1942 and July 9, 1942

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Snovich

A small town near Zlochev/Zolochev in Galicia.


Sokolowka  (Sokal, Sokolivka, Sokolievka, Sokolowka, Sokoliefka)

See also Justingrad which was created after the Jews were forced out of their homes in the village of Sokolivka
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Justingrad

AGAD Sokal Project
Contains the latest status on the project to acquire 19th century birth, marriage and death records for the Sokal district and the towns under its administrative control in Galicia.
http://sokal.jaherz.com

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Has records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/sokolowka_surn.htm


Solotvin  (Solotvyn, Solotwina)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities 

Cemetery
http://www.jewishgalicia.net/Database/Solotwin%20Cemetery%20List.aspx 


Soroeka  (Soroka)

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kishinev/kishinev-history.html  


Sosnovoye (Selisht)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Larry Lavitt

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Stanislaviv (Stanislawow - see also Ivano Frankovsk) & Tysmenitsa - name changed to Ivano- 
                          Frankivsk from  Stanislaviv in 1962)

This town is now located in Ukraine



Books  
             
 

http://www.danwymanbooks.com/hebrew1/hebrew1.htm 
 


Cemetery
The cemetery is a large, fenced in area. The fence is just a few years old. There is a central section with several dozen post-war graves (in Cyrillic), but the rest of the cemetery has no stones with inscriptions. Many horizontal stones - sloped on both sides - are in good condition. But the vertical stones - with the inscriptions - are mostly gone. The ones that are there are mostly broken and fallen, though there are a few that are erect and legible. The inscriptions face the graves. The old Stanisiawow cemetery is under a movie theater.

Holocaust
http://www.memorialdelashoah.org/upload/minisites/ukraine/en/en_
exposition2-ukraine.htm
 

Records
The following records are being indexed by JRI-Poland:

Births: 1864-1874, 1877-1897
Marriages: 1872-1876, 1889-1897
Deaths: 1890-1896

On-line Birth Records: 1881-1892

Included in the 25,600 vital records for this Administrative center are the records for nearby smaller towns and villages.

Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

BvS/18/217-6/1/ Frauen-Verein Stanislau
http://biblio-archive.unog.ch/detail.aspx?ID=37190 

Contact the town leader for further information:Denise Azbill
Famaz@prodigy.net 


Staryy Sambir  (Alstadt - Stary, Stary Sambor, Sambor)

There is currently some restoration work being done on the cemeteries of this shtetl which was known in Yiddish as Alstadt - Stary which means old. It is organized by a Mr. Gardiner in Vancouver, Canada, using the services of Reb Meilech Shochet of L'viv. Since there are many gravestones still visible in places, this may be an added source of information according to Rabbi A. Marmorstein Mehadrin@aol.com 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Laurel White

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Stepan

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Daniel G. Shimshak


Stratyn

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Has records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed. This town is now located in Ukraine.

Births: 1859-1876
Deaths: 1859-1876

Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Strusov

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostaw/sl_strusow.htm 


Stryy   (Stryj)

At one time located in Eastern Galicia; about 40 miles south of L'viv. Much information, including maps, Yizkor Book, Business Directory Database (1891)
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/stryy/stryy.htm 

Holocaust
Chapters on districts of Kolomyia and Stryy from the dissertation Emergence of Genocide in Galicia and resettlement transports to Belzec extermination camp
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html

Yizkor Book
The Yizkor Book Project has a CD with scans of the Stryj Memorial scroll containing names of about 3,000 victims. The names need to be transliterated from Hebrew to English, but familiarity with Germanic names is mandatory as about 90% of the names are 'Germanic." Further information Joyce Field, JewishGen Yizkor Book Project Manager

jfield@jewishgen.org


Strzeliska Nowe

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Has  records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed.
http://www.zchor.org/hitachdut/pinkas2.htm 

http://www.pikholz.org/Pioneers/Pioneers.html 

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/town/strzeliska_nowe.htm 


Strzyzow

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/strzyzow/strzyzow.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Suchostav

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

Towns in this area include:
Borshev, Buchach, Budanov, Burakuvla, Chortkov, Dolina, Gorodnitsa, Grimaylov, Gusyatin, Jagielnica, Kamenka, Khorostkov, Kopychintsy, Kosov, Mikulintsy, Ozeryany, Palashevka, Poortsy, Probuzhna, Romanovka, Satanov, Skalat, Strusov, Suchostav, Terebovlia, Tolstoy, Tudorov, Ulashkovtse and others.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion
/SRRGhome.html
  

Suchostav Region Research Group (SRRG)
This group is researching an area within 25 mile radius of Suchostav, Ukraine.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostaw/SRRGhome.html 

Contact for further information Joan Baronberg
njbaron@uswest.net 


Sudilkov

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://grossmanproject.net/sudilkov_jewish_history.htm 

http://asimplejew.blogspot.com/2009/05/sudilkov-challah.html 


Svezhkovtse

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Svidova

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Svinech (Sviniochi, Swiniuchy)

North east of L'viv and about 12 km from Horochov. Before WWI it had a population of about 1,000.


Swaltkowa Wielka

There were 52 Jews living here when it was part of Galicia.

Synagogue
It had a synagogue and three Hebrew Schools.


Swirz

This town is now located in Ukraine.

Research
Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

Deaths: 1877-1897


Synewodzko Wyzne

Located near Skole, in eastern Galicia


Szczerzec (now called Shcherets)

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Has records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed.


Tarnobrzeg (Dzikow)

Gayle Riley has a Tarnobrzeg-Dzikow web page that includes photos at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Tarnobrzeg/ 

Records
The site includes a 1772 Census of the Jews of Dzikow which was later known as Tarnobrzeg; a list of people selling alcohol; and several other lists, maps, including a map of Jewish sites and more. Gayle has a mailing list of those who desire to have the index to the Tarnobrzeg death index for 1903 - 1928 provided to them. Contact Gayle at
key2pst@pacbell.net 

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Tarnopol (Ternopol)

This town is now located in Ukraine.

Cemetery
The cemetery is fenced in and all the graves are in one corner. Perhaps two hundred or more. Most of the stones are still standing and fairly legible. Almost all have surnames - sometimes the names are in Latin letters.

History, photos and monuments

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Records
Tarnopol Births for 1893-1897 and records for 12 nearby towns, are included in the web page
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agad_tarnopol.htm 

Births and Marriage records are on-line.
All 11,500 death indices are also on-line:
1870-1876, 1878-1892, 1894-1899

Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

To access records at the State Archive of Tarnopol Oblast, the State Archive in L'viv, or other Archives in Ukraine, you can contact the Archive directly, hire a professional researcher, or visit yourself.


Tarnoruda

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Terebovlya (Terebovla, Terebovlia, Trembowla, Terebovlya)

Old capital of Terebovlya province in East Galicia and district center in Ternopol region. Information about the town including history and monuments at
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Ternopil (Tarnopol, Ternopol)

From 1772 to 1919, it was in Austria's Galizien Crownland (Galicia). During this time it's name was spelled Tarnopol. Prior to that it was in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. From the end of WW I to 1939 it was in Poland and was spelled Tarnopol. Then it was in the Soviet Ukraine and now Ukraine. During the Soviet era it was spelled Ternopol, now it is spelled Ternopil. (see Tarnopol, Ternopol, Tarnopol) - photos, history and a monument
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Tlumach


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html


Tolstoye (Tluste)

Located at 49° 16'

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Trenolo


Tributkhovtsy

Regional Special Interest Groups


Trochinbrod

Regional Special Interest Groups


Trostyanets  (Troscianiec, Troscaniec, Trostyanyets)

A village in the Berezhany district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  
 
Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Truskavets (Truskawiec)

A town in Drohobych district - information available at
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm 


Tuchin

Regional Special Interest Groups


Tudorov

Regional Special Interest Groups


Tysmenitsa (Tysmenitza, Tismenitsie)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Susannah R. Juni


Ulanow

Mentioned in the 1891 Galicia Business Directory. It is located in the area of large forests. Polish Count Wlodzimierz Czartoryjski was an owner of the majority of the forests (Las Glinianka) and other lands in this region.

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Ulashkovtse

http://www.nizkor.org/ftp.cgi/places/ftp.py?places//ukraine/chortkiv/commission-report.440621-28  
 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/ukraine.html 

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/ukraine.html 


Ulaszkowce

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Has records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns being indexed.


Urman

A village in Berezhany district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Uscie (Ujscie)

Translates as an outlet 'of the river'. Population of 800 people and was (is) located in Zydaczow district near town of Mikolajow, Stanisiawow Province on the Dniester River near where the Shirka River empties into the Dniester River.


Uscie Biskupie - (Ust'ye) (Bishop outlet)

Located in the Borszczow region in the Tarnopol Province.

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Has records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. Town Leader is Ignacio Sternberg

Births: 1832-1833, 1837, 1840, 1844, 1846, 1848-1849, 1851-1876
Deaths: 1831-1832, 1835-1836, 1839, 1842, 1844, 1846, 1848-1876


Uscie nad Prutem

Translates to 'over River Prut' and is in the Sniatyn district of Kolomyia area, and the Stanisiawow Province. There were 1,240 residents before WW II.


Uscie Ruskie

Located in the Gorlice District.


Uscie Solne

Located in Bochinia near Krakow vicinity.


Ustrzyki Dolne (Stryker)


Velykiv Bychkiv (Bychkov, Zakarpatska)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Vialalge

Located in Zydaczow district near the town of Mikolajow on the Dniester River and had a pre war population of 800.


Vignanka

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Vinnitsa (Vinitza)

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Vishnevets

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


 Vodiane (Name changed in 1940 from Zymna Voda )


Volhynia (Wolin) Guberniya

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Volochisk

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Vorvolintse

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Voynilov

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Wielkie Oczy (Vilkatch, Vilkatchi)

This town is now located in Poland.

Records
Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw and at the Wielkie Oczy Registrar Office are available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/WielkieOczy/

All available records have been indexed and are on-line
Births: 1843-1874
Deaths: 1843-1874

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html

http://roots.home.att.net
 
http://www.ShtetLinks.JewishGen.org/WielkieOczy


Winniki (Vinniki)

This town is now located in Ukraine.

Records
Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

All of the vital records at AGAD are  indexed and on-line
Marriages: 1881, 1883, 1886, 1892-95, 1897, 1899
Deaths: 1885, 1887-89, 1891-92, 1895-96


Wisniowczyk

Located in the Tarnopol Province and is associated with the sour cherry (Wisnia or the alcoholic beverage known as Vishniak). There were two villages in this province by the same name. One Wisniowczyk was located in Podhajce (Pidgaytsy) region and the other in Przemyslany (Peremyshlany). By entering the town name Wisniowczyk for Ukraine in the ShtetlSeeker, current Ukrainian names, slightly modified from the original names will show up. There is a third village known as Wisniowiec (Ukrainian: Vishevets) that is located near Kremenets in Volhynia.


Wulka Mazowieki

Located about 8 miles east of Rawa Ruska, about 30 miles northwest of Lvov. Among the landowners in the area were two Jewish families: the Topfers/Teppers and Kurzers.


Yablanov


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities 

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Yasen

A shtetlach in the Carpathian area.


Yablunivka (Jablonowka, Jablunuwka, Jablonovka)

A village by Buchach
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Yagelnitsa

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Constance Cowen
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Zablotow

Records
The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Has records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanislawow. Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. This is one of the towns currently being indexed.


Zabolotov

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Zalozce (Zalosce)

Cemetery
There is a remnant of a Jewish cemetery in this shtetl. The land where it was located is kept empty and well maintained. It is not fenced, though there are a few broken and illegible tombstones still visible according to Israel Pickholtz at

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Zavaliv

Located in the Galician Podilya (lowlands), on the river Zolota Lypa (Golden Linden), on the left side of river Dniester, some four miles (Galician mile = 7.5 Km) south of Berezhany. The name Zavaliv means "behind the bulwarks".

In Zavaliv in second half of 19th century were 191 houses and 1285 dwellers consisting of 698 Ukrainians, Graeco-Catholics and 587 Roman-Catholics (presumably Polish colonists and Ukrainians christened in Polish church), 12 Germans, 17 Jews and remainder Armenians and other unspecified nations.
'Memoirs by A Galician Ukrainian' A perspective on life
http://members.ozemail.com.au/~retengnr/m_v_skormem.html


Zawalow

This town is now located in Ukraine. Indices created from the records house at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw are available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

Records
All of the vital records available at AGAD are indexed and on-line
Births: 1870-1874, 1876, 1878, 1880-1899


Zbaraz

Cemetery
The cemetery is located on a small street leading in from Zalozce. There are about 120 gravestones with varying degrees of legibility. The cemetery is not fenced in.


Zhabokrich (Kryzhopol)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Charles Lapkoff
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


Zhydachiv - (Zydaczow, Zhydachev, Zhydachov)

The district center in L'viv region; town information - this site offers town information and includes Khodoriv (Chodorow, Khodorov) town in Zhydachiv district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Zmigrod Nowy

Located in the District of Jaslo.

Holocaust
1,250 Jews were murdered by the Nazis in July, 1942. Further information about this shtetl and the surrounding towns are at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/zmigrod/zmigrod.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/poland.html 


Znesinnia (absorbed into L'viv)


Zolkiew (Nesterov, Zhovkva, Zholkva, Zholkva; name changed in 1951 to Nesterov)

Located in Eastern Galicia (Zhovkva , Zholkva and it was known in Yiddish as Zholkva. During the Soviet era it was known as Nesterov. Zolkiew is the Polish name.

Records
If you are a Lemberg researcher, you also may find information of interest. Included on this web site are: Lists of Ellis Island Arrivals from Zolkiew with links to the manifests on the Ellis Island site; maps, Galicia Business Directory, History
http://home.earthlink.net/~brians99/


Zoloty Potik (Zolotyy Potik, Zloty Potok, Zolotoy Potok)

A village by the Buchach castle
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm  


Zolynia

Regional Special Interest Groups
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/sigs.htm 

http://www.polishroots.com/reference/international_resources.htm 

http://www.zolynia.org/zolynia2002/research-9-weblinks.htm 


Zurawno (Zhuravno (Ukrainian spelling Zuravno)

One of 82 towns from Eastern Galicia included in the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland project to index the vital record registers maintained at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw. According to the Polish Archives (Urzad Stanu Cywilnego) , there are no Jewish records in their holdings. Before the war, this shtetl was located in the Zydaczow district of Stanisiawow Province and had 3,208 residents which included 865 Jews. It is about 19 miles from Stryy.

"In 1676, during the Turkish and Tartar Wars, the Battle of Zurawno was fought for three weeks in late September through mid October. After this battle, a treaty was signed and a large number of Polish prisoners were repatriated. It appears that Zurawno was retained as a part of the Polish territories. I know that after the partitions, Zurawno and Rozniatow became part of the Austrian Crownland of Galicia, but I am not certain when this happened. During the inter-war period, I know that a cousin, who was still living in Zurawno, served in the Polish army and on all documents (manifests et al)" From a posting by Marlene Bishow

Records
All of the vital records available at AGAD are indexed and on-line. Town Leader is Israel Pickholtz.

Included are Births from 1877 to 1884.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/index.htm 

There is listings for 629 records of the surname Katz in Stanislawow Province. Records are spread through nine different administration centers, but the majority are located in near to Zurawno towns Stryj, Zydaczow, Bolechow and Stanislawow


Zurow (Zhuriv)


Zymna Voda (Name changed in 1940 to Vodiane)


Zywiec


Books  
             

"Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia, A Recourse Guide"
According to Suzan Wynne's book there are no Jewish records for Zywiec that have been found.

 

Travel Stories

"Our Trip To Galicia"
A trip to Skalat, Rozdol, L'viv, Perehinsko, Rozniatow, Zbaraz, Tarnopol, Dolina, Bolechow, Brezdowicz, Grimaylov, Stanisiawow, Nizniow, Buczacz, Lysiec and Zalozce with photos. There is much to learn from this site at

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/Travelogue2.html 

http://www.tripwolf.com/en/galleries/media/location/42228/15460/
Ukraine/Galicia/2067132478-small-2
  

more to come ...


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