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Use this search box to search all Jewish Web Index pages

Some graphics are from other sites without
permission but with a link to the site

Please note that not all links will work mostly because the
link has been changed or deleted by their respective owner.

Hungarian Jews being Jews being deported in 1941 

Hungary
Located in Central Europe, northwest Counties of the Hungarian Kingdom created by Marton Matyas, 1998. Hungary has the largest Jewish population of any once-Communist state outside the former Soviet Union, with as many as 90,000 Jews in the capital city of Budapest.
www.knecht.ca/history/nowydwor.html

Hungary borders Austria, Croatia, Serbia, Romania,  Slovakia, Slovenia and Ukraine.  The first Jewish settlers came to Buda from the German and the Slavic countries in the second half of the 12th century.  They were twice expelled in the 14th century; in 1349 following the anti-Jewish accusations after the "Black Plaque", and again in 1360 as a result of the hostile influence of the church.  More information can be found at
http://www.bh.org.il/Communities/Budapest.asp
 

The Jews of Budapest were very assimilated and successful members of society. However, anti Semitism was on the rise.  The Numerus Clasus laws were enacted in 1924, limiting Jewish university enrollment at six percent.  Soon Jews were not allowed telephones, radios or pets.  In the summer of 1941, immigrant Jews living in Hungary were deported and massacred.

Hungary was allied with Germany during WW II, thus it was not until 1944 that Hungarian Jews became targets.  At that time, it was estimated that there were approximately 825,000 Jews. In Budapest, walking the streets where 100,000 people were once crowded in the city's ghetto, we learned that on the eve of liberation in late 1944, 20,000 Jews were murdered. On March 22, all Jewish shops were ordered closed and on April 5, Hungarian Jews were ordered to wear the yellow Star of David.  About some 63,000 Jews died or were killed prior to the German occupation. Some of the male Jews were transported to the copper mines of Bor, Yugoslavia, to work as slave laborers.  Between May and July 1944, almost a half-million (440,000) Hungarian Jews were deported to Auschwitz in more than 145 trains.

Today, Hungary has a total population of 10.2 million.  Jews have lived there since Roman times.  Today there are 70,000 to 100,000 Jews who live in the capital city of Budapest.  There are Jews living today in small communities including Miklosc, Debrecen and Szeged and several other smaller towns.  Before WW II, there were over 600,000 Jews and most perished in the Holocaust.  Over half of those still living in Hungary are over the age of 65. 
http://www.odci.gov/cia/publications/factbook/hu.html
 

If you are looking for information about Transylvania and Moldova, ROM SIG covers the Moldova and Transylvania areas and click on Links where you will find a list of maps for Romania, Transylvania and Moldova.
www.jewishgen.org/romsig
 

Hungarian 1848 Census
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/hungary/census1848.htm

Hungary Home Page
http://www.fsz.bme.hu/hungary/homepage.html

For information on family research possibilities in Hungarian archives,  (in Hungarian and in English
http://www.mol.gov.hu

http://www3.sympatico.ca/thidas/Hungarian-history/

http://www3.sympatico.ca/thidas/Hungarian-history/Jews.html


 

Books  
             


"Bridging Three Worlds: Hungarian Jewish Americans"
Authored by Robert Perlman, a Professor Emeritus at Brandeis University.   Available at the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania or by calling (412) 454 6324.


"Fiorello' s Sister: Gemma La Guardia Gluck's Story"
Non-fiction - authored by Gemma La Guardia Gluck and edited by Rochelle G. Saidel, published by Syracuse University Press. Gemma and Fiorello La Guardia were the children of an Italian Jewish mother and a bandmaster in the US Army.  Gemma, who did not practice Judaism, married Herman Gluck, a Hungarian Jew, and made her home in Budapest.  When the Nazis conquered Hungary, the Glucks were arrested in reprisal against her brother, Fiorello La Guardia, then mayor of New York.  Her husband later died in Mauthausen and Gemma was interned at Ravensbruck, as were her daughter and her infant grandson, who were held in a separate barrack.


"From Shtetl to Milltown: Litvaks, Hungarians and Galitzianers in Western Pennsylvania 1875-1925"
Authored by Robert Perlman and published by the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania.  The books tells the story of those who populated McKeesport, Donora, Homestead, Ambridge, New Castle and many other steel and manufacturing towns in Western Pennsylvania  The book is available at the Museum Shop of the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania or by calling (412) 454 6324.  The cost is $18.95 


"Genealogical Gazetteer of the Kingdom of Hungary"
Authored by Jordan Auslander. For each community, information is provided from the population by religion.  If there was no local church or synagogue, the town where each congregation worshiped is indicated.  Additional information about each town includes alternate names and its current name if no longer in Hungary. Towns can be searched alphabetically by their current, former or alternate names
http://avotaynu.com/books/Hungary.htm


"The Hapsburg Empire. The World of the Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy in Original Photographs 1840-1916"
Published in 1972


"Jews in the Hungarian Economy: 1760-1945
Edited by Michael K. Silver and published by the Magnes Press, Hebrew University Jerusalem in 1992.  It is a collection of studies dedicated to Moshe Carmilly-Weinberger on the occasion of his 80th birthday.


"Jewish Life in Hungary"
Authored by Ferenc Orban and published in Budapest by Makkabi.  A bi-lingual (Hungarian and English directory and travel guide to Jewish sites in Hungary).  Lists the names and contact information for Jewish organizations, foundations, social groups, cultural institutions, schools, publications, restaurants and shopping.  Provides a guide to 119 Jewish sites specifically in Budapest, including synagogues, cemeteries and monuments, and list notable sites in the small towns and villages of the Hungarian countryside plus a few maps.


"Killing Kasztner: The Jew Who Dealt With Nazis"
Gaylen Ross explores the fallout from Hungarian Jewish leader Rezso Kaszmer's negotiations with Nazi leaders.  He save more than 1,600 Jews, but was accused of collaboration and ultimately assassinated in 1957.
http://trailers.apple.com/trailers/independent/killingkasztner/


"Magyarorszag Varmegyei es Varosai"
Edited by Samu Borovszky in 1894, there is a portion that deals with the purchase of  real estate in Zemplen in the 1700s and in later years, by Jews whose names are mentioned.


"Monumenta Hungariae Judaica or Magyar - Zsido Okleveltar"
An 18 volume series published at various times from 1903 to 1980.  Each volume contains thousands of documents originally published from the 15th to 19th centuries, relating to the Jewish community in Hungary.  Most of the documents are in Latin or Hungarian. Included in the volumes are numerous censuses taken of various Jewish communities, including a national census taken in 1767.  Most of the census entries are from the 18th century and don't include many surnames.  There are some 1787 surname adoptions lists, though from Tolna megye, giving both old and new names.  For those Hungarian-Jewish researchers, these volumes should be of great value.  The UCLA Library in Los Angeles has the set.


Two sources may help you, according to a posting by Armram Eshel to soc.genealogy.jewish re Budapest Ghetto on 1/19/2003.  1) A series of 3 books titled NAMES (in English) and NEVEK (in Hungarian). 

Part 1 - Names of the deported Jews from Hajdu County, Hungary.

Part 2 and 3 - Names of the Jewish victims of Hungarian Labor Battalions
                    Both have many names from Budapest.

In parts 2 and 3 there is a note (in Hungarian) for each person listed: missing, sick, wounded, buried, died, etc.  Parts 2 and 3 have 34,000 names.  All first names are in Hungarian. Of importance is mother's name of each person.

The name of the author of the books varies in different libraries:
Gavriel BEN-SHAKED; Yad Vashem; Beate and Serge Klarsfeld Foundation.

2)  "COUNTED REMNANTS: Register of the Jewish survivors in Budapest, 1946".  
      In this book' too' the first-names are in Hungarian. The link is set to a PDF file.
      www.cjh.org/pdfs/Hungarian.pdf


General
Hungarian Genealogy

 

   Jewish man watching a house being built in Hungary   

An excellent site to find information about most European countries is at
http://searcheurope.com


and type in the name of the country you wish to research in the search field.  This site is a great source to find information for almost every European country.  Another valuable site to help find a person, maps, etc. is and type in the name of any country you wish to research. This service is free.
http://www.webhelp.com/home
 

The 1877 (Dvorzsák) gazetteer of Hungary (Language: Hungarian)
Description of this source: The RadixHub version of the 1877 gazetteer of Hungary, arranged by counties and districts

The 1913 gazetteer of Hungary (Language: Hungarian)
Description of this source: The RadixHub version of the 1913 gazetteer of Hungary, arranged by counties and districts

Global Gazetteer
A great web site. It is a directory of  2,880,532 of the world's cities and towns, sorted by country and linked to a map for each town.  A tab separated list is available for each country. 
www.calle.com/world/
 


1768 Hungarian Jewish Census

Church Latin was used for occupations.
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/CensusOther.htm


All Hungary Database

Over 30,000 records
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary


Archives

National Archives of Hungary - in Budapest 

http://www.mol.gov.hu/angol/bal_menusor/about_us.html

Digital Images
http://193.224.149.3:8080/mol/picture 

Hungarian Archives - Hungarian Archives of State Magyar
Orszagos Leveltar Budapest I.
Becsikapu Ter. 4
H-1250 Budapest 
Phone 00361 156 58 11  Hours: Mon. to Friday 8:30 to 7:30
http://ihff.nwy.at/frtop.htm
 


Beit Israel Israeli Cultural Institute

http://www.hadassahmagazine.org/site/apps/nlnet/content2.aspx?c=twI6LmN7IzF&b=5724115&ct=7809845


Cemeteries in Budapest

http://www.greatsynagogue.hu/t_cemeteries.html


Centropa

A Vienna based education and research enter on Jewish life in central Europe
http://www.centropa.org   


East European Genealogical Society

http://www.GateWest.net/~eegsi/


European Regional Lists

Most countries in Europe have available information just a click away.  Try WorldConnect
http://www.rootsweb.com/~maillist/europe/index.html
 


Gazetteer of Hungary

This site is being developed to become a toolbox and a link collection for the historical aspects of the settlements of Hungary - as of 1913.
http://www.radixhub.com/

You can browse Gazetteers of Hungary (1877, 1913) and look at the growing list of sources. Also

Genealogical Research

In the lands of the former Austro-Hungarian Monarchy - a Guide to Archives and Parish-Registers 
http://ihff.nwy.at/hpmain.htm
 


Hungarian Counties 

http://www.progenealogists.com/hungary/counties.htm 

http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/maps.htm

Bacs-Kiskun

Barautya

Bekes

Borsod-Abauj-
Zemplen

Csongrad

Fejer

Gyor-Moson-Sopron

Hajdu-Bihar

Heves

Jasz-Nagykun-Szolnok

Komarom-Esziergom

Nograd

Pest

Somogy

Szabolcs-Szaimar-Bereg

Tolna


Hungarian Gazetteer

The 1877 volume lists how many Jews lived in each city, town, village and hamlet and notes the place where they worshipped.  The list of places is in the back of the 2nd volume of this work, which is available on FHL microfiche #6000840
http://www.progenealogists.com/hungary/gazetteers.htm


Hungarian Genealogy and Local History Databases

The purpose of RadixIndex is to provide databases for Hungarian genealogy and local history research. RadixIndex currently offers 1,307,744 records in 7 databases (February 24, 2010).
http://www.radixindex.com/


Hungarian Government web page 

www.kormany.hu


Hungarian Informational Lists

Send an Email: to subscribe: HUNGARY-L-request@rootsweb.com with the word subscribe in the body of the message. Once registered, you can post messages at
HUNGARY-L@rootsweb.com
 

http://hungaria.org/hal/genealogia/index.php?&newsid=316

http://ideas.repec.org/p/wiw/wiwrsa/ersa03p489.html#lists


Hungarian Jewish Concentration Camp Survivors

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust


Hungarian Jewish Roots

http://www.jewishroots.hu/


Hungarian Prime Minister

http://www.kancellaria.gov.hu/


Hungarian Research Service

Family Tree Genealogical Research Bureau.  The following sub-Carpathian (Ukraine), Jewish registers are available and include the following counties: 
Tecso, Tarackozi and Maramarossziget

George Eotvos is the Director
Family Tree Budapest familyt@hungary.net

Birth, Marriage, Death 1851-1853:
Also-Apsa, Felso-Apsa, Kozep-Apsa, Dombo, Ganya, Irholcz, Kirva, Kokenyes, Korosmezo, Lonka, Nyagova, Nyireshaza, Pelesalja, Szlatina, Tarackoz, Tercselpatak.

Birth 1853-1866:
Tecso, Alsokatalinfalva, Alsonyeresznice, Bedohaza, Benecso, Brusztura, Budalesa, Bustyahaza, Csomafalva, Darva, Dombo, Ganya, Irholcz, Kerekhegy, Kiralymezo, Alsoapsa, Kisbocsko, Korosmezo, Kortvelyes,  Szlatina, Tiszafeheregyhaz, Kiskirva, Kokenyes, Lonka, Nagykirva, Nyagova, Oroszmokra, Talabor, Tarackoz, Tarackraszna, Uglija, Ujband, Urmezo, Vajnag.

Birth 1862-1867:
Alsokatalinfalva, Alsonyeresznice, Bedohaza, Benecso, Brusztura, Budalesa, Bustyahaza, Csomafalva, Darva, Dombo, Ganya, Irholcz, Kerekhegy, Kiralymezo, Alsoapsa, Kisbocsko, Korosmezo, Kortyelyes, Kovesliget, Szlatina,  Tiszafeheregyhaz, Kiskirva, Kokenyes, Lonka, Nagykirva, Nyagova, Oroszmokra, Talabor,  Tarackoz, Tarackraszna, Uglija, Ujband, Urmezo, Vajnag.

Birth 1867-1872:
Apsica, Felsoapsa, Kabalacsarda, Kabalapatak, Kortvelyes, Kozepapsa, Szlatina, Tiszafeheregyhaz.

Birth 1868-1878:
Tecso, Benecse, Bustyahaza, Urmezo, Ujband, Talaborfalva, Dulvalva, Vajnag, Csomafalva, Kovesliget, Kricsfalva, Darva,  Uglea, Remete, Tarackoz, Nagykirva, Kokenyes, Ganya,  Kalinfalva, Dombo, Kiralymezo, Bruszturi, Luki, Also-Nyereszmice, Felso-Nyereszmice, Irholcz, Nyagova, Kiskirva, Verespatak, Bedo.

Birth 1872-1886:
Also-Apsa, Kozep-Apsa, Felso-Apsa, Also-Szelistye, Apsica, Hosszumezo, Fejeregyhaza, Kabalapatak, Kaszopoljana, Kortvelyes, Szlatina.

Birth 1887-1894
Also-Apsa, Kozep-Apsa, Felso-Apsa, Also-Szelistye, Apsica, Hosszumezo, Fejeregyhaza, Kabalacsarda, Kabalapatatak, Kortvelyes, Szlatina.

Birth 1895-1918
Also-Apsa, Kozep-Apsa, Felso-Apsa, Apsica, Kabalacsarda, Kabalapatak, Kortvelyes, Falu, Szlatina.

Marriage 1869-1878:
Tecso, Urmezo, Bustyahaza, Talaborfalva, Csomafalva, Kovesliget, Darva, Dulfalva, Uglea, Kerekhegy, Remete, Tarackhaza, Kokenyes, Genya, Kalinfalva, Dombo, Karaszna, Kiralymezo, Bruszturi, Mokra, Lohi, Novoselica, Alsonyeszmice, Budplesa, Bedo, Nyagova.

Marriage 1887-1895
Alsokatalinfalva, Alsonyeresznyice, Bedohaza, Brusztura, Dombo, Felsonyeresznyice, Ganya, Irholcz, Kiralymezo, Kokenyes, Nyagova, Oroszmokra, Szeleslonka, Tarackoz, Tarackraszna.

Death 1854-1867:
Also-Apsa, Kozep-Apsa, Alsokatalinfalva, Apsica, Bardfalva, Dombo, Fejeregyhaza, Ganya, Kabalacsarda, Korosmezo, Szlatina, Katalinfalva.

Death 1862-1867
Taborfalva, Vajnag, Urmezo, Uglea, Kricsfalva, Csomafalva, Darva, Dombo, Ganya, Nagykirva, Kiskirva, Tarackoz, Bedo, Irholc, Neresznye, Remete, Tecso, Bencse, Ujband.

Death 1869-1878
Tecso, Urmezo, Bustyahaza, Talaborfalva, Csomafalva, Kovesliget, Darva, Dulfalva, Uglea, Kerekhegy, Remete, Tarackhaza, Kokenyes, Genya, Kalinfalva, Dombo, Karaszna, Kiralymezo, Bruszturi, Mokra, Lohi, Novoselica, Alsonyeszmice, Budplesa, Bedo, Nyagova, Nemetmokra, Kis-Kirva, Nagy-Kirva, Vajnag, Kerekhegy, Irholca, Ujband, Nyagova, Benecsel, Kovesliget.

Death 1886-1895:
Also-Apsa, Kozep-Apsa, Felso-Apsa, Fejeregyhaz, Kabalacsarda, Szlatina.


Hungarian Research Sites

Included, in this huge web informational site, is a Jewish link as well as maps, Passenger Lists and more
http://www.maxpages.com/poland/Hungarian_Research
 


Hungarian Roots List

Sponsored by Family Tree Ltd. - to subscribe write in the body of the message subscribe hunroots and send Email: to majordomo@euroweb.hu

http://internet-genealogy.com/austriahungary25.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/

http://www.wrhs.org/index.php/library/Archive/ClevJewishArchives/ResJFHistory 


Hungarian Town Photos

Photos of Polish Towns, Ukrainian Towns, Hungarian Towns and Romanian Towns

http://polishjews.org/

http://polishjews.org/photos/index.htm

You might also want to review the towns listed in my Galician page and you can also search for Vital Records for Galician Towns by visiting 
http://www.polishroots.org/galicia_towns.htm


HungarianSIG

There are over 400,000 records in the All-Hungary Database. New information includes updates to the 1869 census and to the birth, marriage and death databases. There are more than 88,000 census, 38,000 birth, 15,000 death and 5,400 marriage records.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary

Locating SIG Mailing Lists, then you will be able to send and receive to the HungarianSIG

Their Home Page offers a number of interesting links to such sites as the 1828 and 1830 List of Names From Censuses and the Nagyvarad Memorial Book Name List, a List of translated professions for 1848 Jewish Census among other lists


Hungary.Org

Another interesting and informative site that includes a language translator (for free) along with several excellent Dictionaries and links to the History of Hungary, Travel, Currency, Photos,, a web search service ... even a free Email: address at
http://hungary.org/hungary/table.html


"Jews of Hungary"

3003665675862367165.JPG
http://collections.yadvashem.org/photosarchive/en-us/115538.html

Sights and sounds of yesteryear's Hungary.  Birthplace of Theodor Herzl and home of one of the largest synagogues in Europe are contained in an exhibit from Beth-Ha'tefutsorth, The Naum Goldmann Museum of the Jewish Diaspora
www.bh.org.il

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Hungary

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Hungary.html

Holocaust
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Hungary.html#The Holocaust   


Jewish Community of Hungary

 Autonom Ortodox Federation
 Budapest 1074, Hungary
 http://kosherdelight.com/HungaryJewishOrganizations.shtml

 Central Board of Hungarian Jews
 Budapest 1075 VII, Hungary

 http://www.jewishheritage.us/index.aspx 
 
Hungarian Jewish Cultural Association

Budapest 1065, Hungary
     
http://www.mazsike.hu/hungarian+jewish+travel+guide/hungarian+jewish+travel+
guide.html


Jewish Genealogy in Hungary

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/hungary/census1848.htm


Jewish University

The rabbinical seminary forms a part of the Budapest Jewish community - run Jewish University
http://www.or-zse.hu/ang/


Jews in Hungary: History and Genealogy
 

Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive, issue 101, January-March 2010

Georges GRANER starts his presentation of Jewish-Hungarian genealogy research by describing the history of Hungary from the 14th century up to the Holocaust. He then presents the condition of the Jews during the same period. He finally provides a complete list of the steps to be followed to obtain adequate information when searching Jewish ancestors in Hungary
http://www.genealoj.org/New/ENrevue/revue101.html


Maps

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Atlas_of_Hungary#Old_maps

Map of the city of Budapest

Austro-Hungarian Empire circa 1880 or 1890s
Very detail map is located on LDS Film #1,045,395?  At the beginning of the film is a grid layout of all the sections that follow.  Basically you need to identify a zone and a column and then search that area
http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/library/public/genealogy.html

Austro-Hungarian Military Topographic Maps
Scale 1:75,000 - Contact Lavrentiy Krupnak at Lkrupnak@erols.com  for a 1,877k jpeg file via Email: . It will take about 10 minutes to download. You may also find these same, or similar maps, at the U.S. Library of Congress

http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/digkonyv/topo/3felmeres.htm

http://semanchuk.com/gen/maps/

Old Bereg County - here is a map web site with Hungarian place names.  You will note the large town of Munkacs in the middle of the map and Klucsarka about 5 km southwest of it on the main road.  Just north of Klucsarka is Uj-Davidhaza (New Davidhaza) and just north of that is O-Dav (Old Davidhaza).  The maps at this site are large and take a while to download, but they are wonderfully detailed 
http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/bereg.jpg
 

Hungarian Map - 1910  
http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/ung.jpg
 

http://lazarus.elte.hu/moterkep/mb.htm

The Map Division at the New York Public Library
Has a set of maps of Hungary which might be helpful in genealogical research.  This set of maps has not yet been entered in their on-line card catalog, CATNYP.  The bibliographic entry for this set as listed in their printed catalog is 'Spezialkarte der Oesterreichisch-ungarischen Monarchie, im Masse: 1:75,000 der natur'. Unofficially, it is referred to as Austria-Hungary 1:75,000. It has not been entered into the pre-1971 map (as opposed to book) acquisitions or into the computer database yet, so you will not find it in CATNYP.  It was published in Vienna over a period of years, 1877-1914.The K.u.k. (the abbreviation of 'Kaiserliche und Konigliche' (=Imperial and Royal) (title of the institutions that were shared under the Dual Monarchy, such as military, etc. refers to the cartographic unit of the Military and Geographic Institute of the state.  The set is in 776 sheets and comes with an index which can be consulted in the Map Division.

Northern Hungary - Austro-Hungarian Empire 1882 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html


Open Street Maps
The crowd-sourced mapping project OpenStreetMap has amassed a million contributors since its inception in 2005 and, according to navigation app maker Skobbler, boasts greater accuracy in England, Russia and Germany than rivals such as Google Maps.  I tried the site and found an accurate drawing of my father's ancestral town Tal'ne, Ukraine.  Almost every country is available as is most towns
http://openstreetmap.org

Transylvania-Eastern Hungary - Austro-Hungarian Empire 1882 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html

Western Hungary - Austro-Hungarian Empire 1882
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html


Newspapers of Hungary

http://www.access-hungary.hu/index.php

http://www.yivoinstitute.org/pdf/newspapers_periodicals.pdf


Post Offices of Former Austrian Territories

Includes Base post offices in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bohemia, Hungary, Levant, Lombardy, Mantua, Moravia, Silesia, Prague, Poland (Galicia), Venetia and Yugoslavia  all places are in alphabetical order, with provinces prefixed 
http://www.kitzbuhel.demon.co.uk/austamps/pobook/main.htm


Property Tax

The 1828 Hungarian Property Tax Census on-line database has been updated and includes 11,000 entries!  For further information contact Eric M. Bloch bloch@wi.rr.com
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/Census1828.htm


Research in Romania and Hungary

Professional genealogical researcher, Professor of Jewish History at the University of Cluj-Napoca, Ladislau Gyemant, PhD communicates in English Phone 011 40 64 167256 or Email: gyemant@zortec.ro

The Jewish Communities of Hungary in the Hungarian Jewish lexicon of 1929
URL with the original description/introduction of the source:
http://mek.oszk.hu/04000/04093/html/

http://mek.niif.hu/04000/04093/html/index.htm

Language:  Hungarian
 Languages

Description of this source: The lexicon gives detailed descriptions of 250+ shtetls in Hungary, including places beyond the 1920 borders.
http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/sources/the_jewish_communities
_of_hungary
_in_the_hungarian_jewish_lexicon_of_1929


Search Engines for Hungary

Scroll down to 'Search Engines'
http://slavic.osu.edu/

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/places/tiszafured


Slavophilia

A comprehensive guide to Internet resources on Russia and Central/Eastern Europe 
http://www.slavophilia.net/eng/


Translating   Languages

There are many translating services, some for free, available to help with your translating needs in most languages including Hungarian, Magyar.  One of these sites
http://www.dictionaries.travlang.com/

Just in case you didn't think of it, contact a nearby university or college's foreign language department.  They may offer to write letters and translate letters into English.  A nominal fee is usually charged.

Translation Service
A commercial site offering many language translating programs
http://www.worldlanguage.com

Translation Services
I found an interesting site that offers to translate Hungarian to English as well as Hungarian to German and in addition, links to a number of important Dictionaries - Click on Languages.  Site takes a bit of time to load.
http://hungary.org/hungary/
 

Translating Services
-
Languages

Traveling to Hungary? 

See my Traveling Roots page.

Jewish-Heritage Travel
Heritage, Travel and History in Europe's Jewish Heartland, Hungarian Edition
http://jewish-heritage-travel.blogspot.com/


Yizkor Books


Hungarian
Cities and Shtetls  

  
Budapest Dohány Synagogue - second largest in the world
http://www.greatsynagogue.hu/gallery_syn.html


Abony

A Jewish community of a few hundred.  A ghetto was established by the Nazis in April 1944 and in June, the Jews were deported to Auschwitz.

http://jlue.wordpress.com/2011/05/23/hungarian-jews-killed-by-arrow-cross-along-the-danube-river/

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_hungary/hun127.html


Arya Megye

Record of the Jewish names registered in the rabbinic congregation Arva Megye, Hungary, 1787 
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Eger/

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/hungary/arya-megye.html


Banska Bystrica

http://feefhs.org/MF/SK/SK-JEW1.HTML


Bistritz 

The place should be instantly recognizable to all fans of the horror novel as the place where Jonathan Harker stopped off on his way to Castle Dracula. Bistritz is described near the opening of the book as an old place close to the frontier between Hungary and the Austrian province of Bukovina. There are other details in the book about the town and region that author Bram Stoker picked up from books in the British Library.

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0003_0_03027.html 

http://www.impalapublications.com/blog/index.php?/archives/2673-A-Carpathian-tour-Germans-and-Jews-in-Rumania-Part-3,-by-Rudolf-Fischer.html

Cemetery
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cam37/888911248/


Bodrogkeresztur

Located in northeast Hungary
http://sigmondbooks.com/text-greenhorn/text-greenhorn-1ch02.htm

http://www.jewishvisitorsservice.com/t_tours_east.html


Budapest


Buda
on one side and Pest is on the other - Budapest

Capital of Hungary, technically lies in both Eastern and Western Europe.  The Danube River divides the city into Buda and Pest, distinct entities until they were joined to form Budapest in 1872.  This beautiful city is considered the 'Paris' of the East'.  In the 19th and early twentieth centuries, an area just north of the Dohány Street Synagogue was once heavily Jewish - nearly 1 in 4 residents of Budapest was Jewish.   A wonderful web site to visit for details about this city is at
http://www.bh.org.il/Communities/Budapest.asp
 

Jews, during WW II suffered under the rigid rules of the Hungarian authorities and later, the Nazis --- no phone calls, no radio, no mail, no alcohol and no prayer.  Many survived with the help of Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat, and others who had fooled the Germans while hiding Jews until the Red Army offered liberation.  The city itself, was devastated after WW II by the Soviets and before, by the Nazis.


Books  
             

"The Great Jewish Cities of Central and Eastern Europe: A Travel Guide and Resource Book to Prague, Warsaw, Cracow and Budapest"
Authored by Eli Valley 


 

  Budapest Dohány Synagogue Photo

The Dohány Synagogue (The Great Synagogue is located in District VII, Dohanyu 2-8) is the second largest in the world and is a towering shrine that is a testament to the life of Jews all over Pest.  It houses the National Jewish Museum.  Dohány translates to tobacco and was taken from the name of the street it is located in Belvarios, the inner city of Pest, in the astern section of Budapest.  It was built between 1854-59 by the Neolog Jewish community of Pest and offers 4,000 seats. In 2010, there are more than a dozen synagogues in the city; three main day schools; the Jewish University; the all purpose Balint Haz Jewish Community Center; the Jewish Cultural Association and publications including the independent Szombat monthly.
www.mazsike.hu

Running perpendicular to the Jewish Ghetto, which is between Dohány utca, Kiraly utca and Erzseber korut, is the wide Karoly Krt Boulevard. Nearly 70,000 Jews were confined to this small, walled-off neighborhood that today looks charming with a restaurant, a Jewish bookshop and a coffee shop that serves Jewish pastries.  Next to the synagogue is a monument honoring the Jews who suffered and died during the Holocaust.  Detailed information can be found at this web site
http://www.bh.org.il/database-links.aspx?communities

There is a photo exhibition by Jeff Gusky which includes photos of this city he recently photographed 
http://www.jeffgusky.com/

http://marvaoguide.com/index.php/Hungary/Jewish-Budapest.html

Cemeteries
http://www.greatsynagogue.hu/t_cemeteries.html

Community
Balint Haz Jewish Community Center
http://www.eajcc.eu/jcccenter.aspx?id=741

The Jewish Cultural Association 
www.mazsike.hu

Golem Theatre
http://www.afjt.com/mem/golem.htm 

Jewish Theater
Budapest Jewish Theater
http://www.jewish-theatre.com/visitor/article_display.aspx?articleID=195

Spinoza Coffee House
A coffee house and theater
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEfQlo_gpmc

Synagogues
http://www.greatsynagogue.hu/syns.html

Szombat
A monthly publication offering information on events and trends in the modern Jewish world and more.
http://www.szombat.org/archivum/regi/eudv.htm

Synagogues
Nagyfuvaros Street Synagogue
Located in a working class downtown neighborhood of Budapest

http://www.360cities.net/image/nagyfuvaros-street-synagogue-budapest#0.00,0.00,70.0

Pesti Shul
An independent, modern Orthodox congregation
http://www.wideweb.hu/hungary/country-information/people-society/judaism/pesti-shul-modern-orthodox-jewish-community

http://www.pestisul.hu/english.php  

Virtual Tour of Budapest
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Budapest.html

Youth Organizations
Marom Budapest of the Masorti (Conservative) movement
http://www.masortiworld.org/marom/chapters/hun


Budszentmihaly (Semihaly)

Cemetery
This cemetery as reported by the Heritage Foundation for Preservation of Jewish Cemeteries (HFPJC) is not in good condition
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/hungary/budszentmihaly.html


Bushchyno (Bustyahaza, Bushtyna, Bushtino)

The Rusyn name for Bustyahaza.  Bustyahaza was the former Magyar (Hungarian) name when it was in Maramaros County.  During the Soviet period, it had the spelling Bushtyna, which is also the current Ukrainian spelling.  Bushtino was the former Czechoslovak official place name.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_hungary/hun348.html


Cigand

There was a Jewish presence - located in Zemplen megye (Zemplen county)
http://www.crwflags.com/FOTW/flags/hu-bz-ci.html


Cluj (Kolozsvar)

Formerly known as Kolozsvar and was located in Hungary in the late 18th century.
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/0127_Cluj-survivors.html


Debrecen

Located in Hungary's Hajdu Megye (Country) Raoul Wallenberg disappeared somewhere on his way to having a meeting with Marshall Rodion Malinovsky in Debrecen.

It is the third largest city in Hungary, located in the northeastern part of the country on the Nagy Alfold (Great Plain), near the present-day Romanian border. Debrecen is a major center of Hungarian Calvinism. In 1941, 9,142 Jews lived there, comprising 7.3 percent of the population. An officially recognized
Jewish community existed in the city from the mid-nineteenth century
http://www1.yadvashem.org/odot_pdf/microsoft%20word%20-%20185.pdf
 

http://dzsh.hu/?page_id=310

http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Debrecen

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Debrecen/

www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/0008_Debrecen.html 


Mordechai Klein headstone - side view
https://family.daitch.us/showmedia.php?mediaID=84

Cemetery
https://family.daitch.us/showmap.php?cemeteryID=8


Dunaujvaros (Dunapentele, Dunaújváros, Sztalinvaros)

Dunaújváros is situated on the left bank of the Danube, on the loess plateau of Pentele and in its side-valley, on the eastern border of Mezőföld.

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/hungary/dunaujvaros.html

History
http://www.sulinet.hu/oroksegtar/data/telepulesek_ertekei/Dunaujvaros/pages/
Dunaujvaros_tortenete/006_summary.htm

Yizkor Book
http://resources.ushmm.org/Holocaust-Names/List-Catalog/display/details.php?type=nlcat&id=140520&ord=23

"A Dunapentelei Zsido Kozosseg - Temetojuk - Fotok iv Kotet"
(The Jewish Community of Dunapentele, Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Fiomea  (Fiume)

A port on the Adriatic near Trieste that used to be in the Hungarian county of Modrus-Fiume.  Today it is in either Croatia or Slovenia depending upon when the border changes.
http://www.giorgioperlasca.it/inglese/vita2.html

http://horinca.blogspot.com/2008/07/rijeka-pleskavica-cevap-and-free.html


Grosbedan

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/EURO-JEWISH/1999-02/0919553015


Gyonk

There are Regional Special Interest Groups that have Hungary information and links.  The site includes links to Bohemia-Moravia SIG, Denmark SIG, German-Jewish SIG, Hungary SIG and Stammbaum - German SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html


Gyor

Gyor Synagogue

Contact Stephen Schmideg   There are Regional Special Interest Groups that have Hungary information and links.  The site includes links to Bohemia-Moravia SIG, Denmark SIG, German-Jewish SIG, Hungary SIG and Stammbaum - German SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html

Another source of information, both in English and Hungarian. It's necessary to scroll down the page to get to the Gyor photos and information.
http://gyorjewish.org/main.htm
 

http://gyorjewish.org/

Cemetery
http://www.gyorjewish.org/clist/

Research
List of Holocaust Martyrs
http://gyorjewish.org/s1.htm


Hajdunana

Jewish Cemetery
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2008-11/msg00193.html 


Hodmezovasarhely (Hóldmezővásárhely [Hungarian], Ioneşti [Romanian], Vašarelj [Croatian)

A city in southern Hungary. Jews first settled on the estate of the family of Count Károlyi within the boundaries of the city in 1748 but were expelled in 1770 because of the objections raised by the Greek Orthodox Church
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0009_0_09084.html

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/hodmezovasarhely/

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/hungary/hodmezovasarhely-csong.html


Homok (Kholmok)

Homok is the Magyar name for Kholmok.

http://www.londonfhc.org/content/catalogue?p=World,Hungary,Sopron,Kismartonv%E1ralja&f=1 

History
http://eng.sahy.sk/sahy-center-of-hont-ipel-region.phtml?id5=3292


Huzst

Formerly located in Czechoslovakia but now in the District of Uzhgorod, Transcarpathia (today Kholmok (Cholmok), Ukraine),
http://compellingjewishstories.blogspot.com/2010/08/net-of-dreams-familys-search-for.html 

Research
http://www.crt-ii.org/_awards/_apdfs/Keller_Marie.pdf


Kallo

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/hungary/kallo-nogr.html

Research
http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameResults.html?placeBeforeTheWar=Kallo,%20%20Hungary&placeBeforeTheWarType=LITERAL&language=en


Kalosca

Only five children survived among four grades of pupils in Kalocsa's Jewish elementary school in 1942. Credit: Courtesy of Gabor Kalman, "There Was Once"
Only five children survived among four grades of pupils in Kalocsa’s Jewish elementary school in 1942. Credit: Courtesy of Gabor Kalman, “There Was Once

The majority of the inhabitants of Kalocsa are Roman Catholics, however, there was also a robust Jewish community that made up 5.9% of the population at the time of the Second World War
http://hungarianspectrum.wordpress.com/2012/12/09/there-was-once-a-documentary-about-the-jewish-community-of-kalocsa-hungary/

http://jbspins.blogspot.com/2011/09/there-was-once-small-town-in-hungary.html

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/hungary/kalocsa-bkk.html

Holocaust
http://hungarianspectrum.wordpress.com/2014/02/10/the-budapest-holocaust-memorial-senter-publishes-its-professional-communique/

Photos
http://hungarianspectrum.wordpress.com/2014/02/10/the-budapest-holocaust-memorial-senter-publishes-its-professional-communique/


Karasz

www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/HSIG_ICJG2007.ppt 

www.knecht.ca/history/nowydwor.html 


Kisvarda

This site has summaries of the towns around Kisvarda - just follow the links  
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kisvarda 

Yizkor Book
"
Kisvarda es Kornyeke Zsidosaga Emlekkonyv" (Memorial Book of the Jews of Kisvarda and its Vicinity)

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Komron (Komarom)

Located 47 miles WNW of Budapest.

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Encyclopedia_Americana_(1920)/Lehar,_Franz


Kosice - (known as Kassa in 1940)

It was the site of the first Jewish ghetto established on Hungarian territory, following the German occupation of the country in 1944.


Kôszeg

March of deportees to the railway station in Kôszeg (1944).
March of deportees to the railway station in Kôszeg (1944).
http://www.holocaust-history.org/hungarian-photos/

March of deportees on the streets of Kôszeg in 1944.
http://www.holocaust-history.org/hungarian-photos/


Kunszentmarton

Located south of Budapest.

Synagogue
It
has a synagogue that is currently being restored.  It will now be used as a cultural center, including a concert hall and gallery.  The synagogue was built in 1911-12 and combines traditional Jewish symbolism with Hungarian designs in  Art Nouveau style. It functioned as a house of worship until 1964, when the official Hungarian Jewish community sold it and was used as a furniture warehouse until it was no longer used, and then left vacant.  Restoration work was initiated by municipal authorities in 1990s.  
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_hungary/hun488.html  

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_hungary/hun488.html


Latranyi

Cemetery
There is a Jewish cemetery here
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/hungary/latrany-somogy.html


Mad

The city is located close to several villages where Hasidic rabbis are known to be buried. 

Synagogue
There is a baroque style synagogue still standing.  The town is in the northeastern part of Hungary and the synagogue is now being restored and is expected to be used as a memorial museum and educational center  It was built around 1795 and is one of the finest surviving examples of this type of synagogue architecture and one of the oldest surviving synagogues still standing in the country. 

Since 1944, the synagogue has stood empty when the Jewish community was deported by the Nazis to Auschwitz.  Remaining today, though not in good condition, is the synagogue itself along with the former yeshiva and the rabbi's residence, though all are in disrepair.

There is a plaque hanging inside the synagogue that commemorates the hundreds of local Holocaust victims.  If you are interested in donating money to help with this, or any other synagogue's restoration, see 
www.worldmonuments.org
 

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_hungary/hun340.html


Miskolc

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Miskolc/early.html

Cemetery
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/tree/CemList.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/tree/CemList.htm


Munkacs (Mukachevo)

Once located in Hungary, it is now Mukachevo, Ukraine. It is a city located in the Zakarpattia oblast and is an important industrial and cultural center in the region.  Mukachevo city has the population of about 95,000 (2010). Mukachevo is located in a very picturesque area at the southwestern foot of the Carpathian Mountains. The town stands on the Latoritza River, 40 kilometers northwest of Uzhhorod. Mukachevo was rather big according to Subcarpathian standards. At the beginning of the 20th century its population constituted 32,000 people. Half the population was Jewish. There were also Hutsuls [Ukrainians in Subcarpathia], Hungarians, Czechs, Slovaks and other nationalities. People were friendly, tolerant and respectful toward each other’s customs and religion. There were never any Jewish pogroms [4] in this area.
http://videos.centropa.org/index.php?nID=30&x=PXVuZGVmaW5lZDsgc2VhcmNoVHlwZT1CaW9EZXRhaWw7IHNlYXJjaFZhbHVlPTE
wMjsgc2VhcmNoU2tpcD0wOyBvcmlTVD1uYW1lOyBvcmlTVj1Ba2VybWFu
 

http://www.jewnet.ru/eng/orgs/?region_id=98&profile_id=0&corp_id=0&action=search

http://ukrainetrek.com/mukachevo-city

http://www.laderafrutal.com/berehovo.html

http://www.fjc.ru/communities/institution.asp?AID=95551


Books  
             

"The Carpathian Diaspora: The Jews of Subcarpathian Rus"
Authored by Omer Bartov. 


Nagy Bocsko (Nagy Bocska, Maramaros, Erdely)

Regional Special Interest Groups
The site includes links to Bohemia-Moravia SIG, Denmark SIG, German-Jewish SIG, Hungary SIG and Stammbaum - German SIG Contact Leslie Gyi

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html

www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Maramures/NagyBocsko/

www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/townsites.htm


Nyiregyhaza

Located 126 miles ENE of Budapest
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_hungary/hun379.html  


Pecs

Once had a prominent Jewish community. The town counted approximately 4,000 Jews. 

Synagogue
There is one synagogue still standing, though it had at one time four.  Inside the synagogue, is a beautiful interior that holds memories of the four thousand Jews who were murdered there.
http://caboodle.hu/nc/directories/category/subcategory/single_page/synagogue_pecs/
   

http://www.edwardvictor.com/2005/Pecs.htm


Pressburg  (aka Bratislava in Slovakian and Pozsony in Hungarian)

This town was in Hungary before WW 1 and was the capital of Hungary from 1541 (when the Turks captured Buda) until 1784.
http://www.jewish-guide.pl/slovakia/41


Putnok

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/hungary/putnok-boaz.html


Salgotarjan


Salgotarjan Cemetery

Cemetery
http://www.angelfire.com/ia3/study/salgotarjanang.htm

Holocaust
Some 2,000 Jews were deported to Auschwitz in 1944
http://resources.ushmm.org/hsv/source_view.php?SourceId=18492


Saros Megye (Saros County)

Records
1869 Census
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary 


Sa'rospatak

"Necrology Scroll"   
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Satoraljaujhely 

Records
In the record books for this city, for the first time a Jew is mentioned in 1664.  The names were Macskassy Janos and his wife Zsido Katalin.

"Jewish Orthodox records(1887-1895)
Not microfilmed by the Mormons. The records are almost complete! Only 4 records are missing:

Birth:       1889 and 1892
Marriage: 1891
Death:     1889

"I was lucky enough to find my gg-parents marriage certificate(1894) with all its precious information, as well as a wealth of data that has greatly enriched my family tree!"  From a posting by Andres Carciente

It has been just  published in Israel a new book about Satoraljaujhely by Mr. Mnashe Davidovits:

It provides two lists:
1)*Martyrs* and
2)*Survivors*

As there are not deportation lists available (till now), what Mr. Davidovits did was to collect the birth certificates from the children born between 1928 and 1944:they were the most vulnerable ones (age 0 till 16) together with their mothers. The author also collected information from Yad Vashem and from survivors' testimonies.

The book includes important sections from  Meir SAS' famous book, that is out of print (Toronto,1986) and a classic by itself, and also sections from Mr. Csiki's book.  The book is trilingual: English, Hungarian and Hebrew.  From a posting by Andre Carciente andrescarciente@yahoo.com  Editor's Note: Mr. Carciente does not mention the name of the book.
http://personal.riverusers.com/~magyarlynn/photographs_from_satoraljaujhely.htm
  


Selmecbanya

This is a mining town where Jews were not permitted to settle until the middle of the 19th century.  The first Jews arrived in the 1870s and by the 1920s there about 150 Jews (140 families) here.  In 1910 there were 527 Jews.  The Chevra Kadisha was established in 1892.  The business life of the town and its surrounds were dominated by Jewish merchants, manufactures and craftsmen.  Prominent names in the 1920s were Jakab Hell, Kalman Ungar, Adolf Weisz, Sandor Erdos and Jeno Timfold.
http://www.selmec-sopron.eu/eng_32_web.pdf


Sepsiszentgyorgy (Sfatu Georgiu, Romania)

Now known as Sfatu Georgiu, Romania
http://www.bogardi.com/


Storozhynets - (formerly known as Ordarma)

Located at 48-10/25 and about 25 miles from the Ukrainian border.
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/storojinet/ 


Stropkov


Books  
             

"The Jews of Stropkov"
http://www.avotaynu.com/books/stropkov.htm

http://travel.spectator.sk/articles/80/slovenske_narodne_povstanie_the_slovak
_national_uprising
 
 


Svidnik

http://www.cometoslovakia.com/museums.html


Szeged

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0019_0_19452.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Szeged


Sziget

Cemetery
http://www.gyorjewish.org/clist/Szobrancz


Szobrancz (Sobrance, Slov)


http://web.mac.com/lmort/Vivian_Kahn_Family_Website/Szobrancz.html


Tiszafured


On the left side – Salamon Rubinstein, seller, 1829-1917, before of him is his wife, and the Family Ungar, they were peasant Jews, sellers, too. They had lived near to Fured, on Tiszaigar, Nagyivan, the wedding photo was made in 1906, in Karcag.
http://adale.org/TiszafuredPhotos2.html

An Entity of Type: populated place, from Named Graph:
http://dbpedia.org

within Data Space:
dbpedia.org
http://dbpedia.org/page/Tiszaf%C3%BCred

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Tiszafured/

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/hungary/tiszafured-jns.html

Photos
http://adale.org/TiszafuredPhotos2.html

Population
http://www.trueknowledge.com/q/population_of_tiszaigar_2011


Ujhely


Abandoned Jewish synagogue and cemetery
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A1toralja%C3%BAjhely#Jewish_history

"In 1761, a Jew Philep Izsak (note: in this period, any official record would have the notation "Judaeus" in front of the name of any Jew) and his wife, Judovics Erzsebet, bought a house in Paloty Street from the Honourable (lit: nagysagos) Szegedy Johanna.  There is a mention from a generation earlier in a less official form.  Teutsch David, an Ujhely resident who passed away in 1860, mentioned in his will that his grandfather settled in Ujhely in 1734, when there were only two Jewish families there.  Later, one find more frequent mention of Jews buying real property.  Here, according to the city's registry book, on May 8, 1799, Kozba Gabor and his wife sold their house in Cserko street to the Jew David Rabbe and Markus Anna, along with the cellar.

The first mention of the existence of a Jewish school in Ujhely is from 1744, in the record book of the steward of the Regeczi and Pataki estate (Conscriptio Pratorum).  Here it mentions that in the "Willow Tree meadow," which was owned by the city, there was a small section set aside for the Jewish school.

The above mentioned documents cast an interesting light on land ownership by the Jews in the mid-18th century.  It suggest that the claim that Jews could not buy or inherit land in the earliest times is a fallacy. It is possible that Zemplen County was more liberal in this regard than the laws of the rest of the country, and followed a different rule. " 

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/hungary/ujhely.html


Ujfeherto, Szabolcs County

There are Regional Special Interest Groups that have Hungarian information and links.  The site includes links to Bohemia-Moravia SIG, Denmark SIG, German-Jewish SIG, Hungary SIG and Stammbaum - German SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html


Ujvaros, Hungary

Now known as Orasu Nou and was in the eastern part of Szatmarmegye (approx. 1878)
http://web.mac.com/lmort/Vivian_Kahn_Family_Website/Ujvaros_Jewish_History.html


Ujvidek (renamed Novid Sad, Yugoslavia)

http://ezwieback.com/Zwieback/Zwibach.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Novi_Sad


Ungmegye

This town was once located in Hungary, but now is in Ukraine.  It is about 15 miles ESE from Ungvar

Research
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/hungary/census1848.htm


Ungvar (Uzhhorod)

Records
This site offers the 1848 Census of Jewish Residents  
http://www.familytree.hu/doc/UNGVAR.txt


Uyvarus (Orasul Nou)

Located between Satumare and Sighet in Transylvania. 

http://jewsinoradea.wordpress.com/page/2/

Yizkor Book
"Bedamayich Chayi"
Published in Jerusalem and based on a Pinkas Mohalim
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania2.html


Varpalota

Cemetery
http://www.vosizneias.com/56647/2010/05/31/varpalota-hungary-graves-vandalized-marble-tombstone-of-jewish-cemetery-stolen


Vishnye Bystra

Located in the Carpathian Mountain, now in the Ukraine, but previously it was part of Hungary and Czechoslovakia.  Links connect to maps, family memoirs, pictures and links to other Carpathian Jewish sites.  Webmaster is Karin Wandrei kwandrei@pacific.net
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Verkhnyaya_Bystra/


Vranov

There was a Jewish presence - located in Zemplen megye (Zemplen county)
http://www.library.utoronto.ca/moorish/synhtm/Vranov%20nad%20Topl'ou.htm

more to come ... 


 

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