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Poland    Galicia     Lithuanian Shtetls    Ukrainian Shtetls

 

Use this search box to search all Jewish Web Index pages

Some graphics are from other sites without
permission but with a link to the site

Please note that not all links will work mostly because the
link has been changed or deleted by their respective owner.

General Links to Cities, Towns 
and Shtetls of Poland

 
 More photos and information at
 http://roots.home.att.net/
                                   

For a list of hundreds of towns in Poland, with current information  about  them, including the name and telephone number of the Mayor of each. 
There is a lot of current information about Poland at this site.
http://www.bmb.pl/ 
 

http://www.polishjews.org/services.htm

http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Shtetl

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/index.php?fraza=&town=Weezer&text=on&foto=on&audio=on&video=on&app=search2&lang=en


Association of Polish Jews in Israel
(Center of Organizations) Names, Addresses and phone numbers of Jews from various shtetls in Poland who may have information of value in your research.
158 Dizengoff St.
63461 Tel Aviv, Israel
Tel: 00-972-3-5225078
Fax: 00-972-3-5236684

Cemeteries in Polish Towns
http://www.galiciantraces.com/shtetl.htm

http://www.wcss.wroc.pl/wroclaw/religia/cmen/cm_zy_a.htm

http://fodz.pl/?d=10&l=en

History of the Jews in Poland
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwA6Ug3OTpU&feature=related

List and Locations of Polish Towns
http://www.polishjews.org/places/003.htm

Jews in Poland
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qT6fHpkdN5w&feature=related

http://newvoices.org/2011/11/30/there-are-still-jews-in-poland-back-to-the-old-world/

Poland Provinces Map site 
http://www.polishroots.com/images/pol1921.gif

If the city you are looking for in Poland isn't listed below, I would suggest you go to the  following site and just click on the first letter of the town you wish to find 
http://www.pharao.com/cam/Europe/Poland/?Blaszki/transportation.html
 

There is a German and Polish gazetteer that will assist you in looking up the  present names and location of old German and Polish towns  
www.kartenmeister.com  

http://nancy.polishsite.us/PilotInstrfr.htm

Canadian Foundation of Polish - Jewish Heritage
http://www.polish-jewish-heritage.org/eng/Feb_04_recent_events_about.htm


German-Polish Town Names equivalency

http://www.kartenmeister.com/

Names of Towns that Issued Passports  
Lists of all Town names (birthplace) extracted from the Polish Aliyah Passports Project
http://www2.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jhi/aliyah-passport_town.htm

Mark Halpern, AGAD Archive Coordinator stated in a Gesher Galicia SIG message "I can assure all researchers who are searching the JRI-Poland database for records that have been indexed from the AGAD Archives that ALL records in each and every register at AGAD has been indexed.  All these records are in Polish or German, so transliteration from Cyrillic is not a problem.  Of course, there are probably some errors resulting from difficult to read entries and aging of the registers.

If the vital event you are seeking is not in the index, there are many reasons why the event may not have been registered.  However, as with all JRI Poland indexing initiatives, indexing is done with great care and checked and rechecked. 


Photos

Photos of Polish Towns, Ukrainian Towns, Hungarian Towns and Romanian Towns

http://polishjews.org/

http://polishjews.org/photos/index.htm

You might also want to review the towns listed in my Galician page and you can also search for Vital Records for Galician Towns by visiting 
http://www.polishroots.org/galicia_towns.htm


"One of the great values of the JRI-Poland indexing is that you, the researcher,  can search by surname and town using Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex to identify  possible ancestors.  Nobody, not the best private researcher or Archivist, will search as thoroughly as you."

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland AGAD Archives Project
This report  provides the information researches need to track the indexing of Jewish vital records for 86 Administrative towns in East Galicia
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
  

The page is organized alphabetically by the current name of the 86 Galician towns (83 of the towns are currently in Ukraine and 3 Poland) The table summarizes the records available for indexing, the current status of funding, and the current status of indexing.  

Clicking on the town name provides more details, including links to the Town Leader, Yizkor Book translations, ShtetLinks sites, Surname lists, and Research groups, if available.  Mark Halpern Willie46@aol.com is the AGAD Archives Coordinator of the JRI-Poland Project.


ShtetlSeeker
This site gives variant spellings of towns and villages, as well as map co-ordinates

http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSeeker/loctown.htm

Virtual Shtetl Portal
This web site will come up in Polish, however you can get a free translation of this, as well as any other pages, by downloading and installing Google Translator.
http://www.sztetl.org.pl

 

               
Polish Cities, Towns
and Shtetls

   

http://www.mathsci.appstate.edu/~sjg/jewishgen/16b.JPG
 


Maps

Open Street Maps
The crowd-sourced mapping project OpenStreetMap has amassed a million contributors since its inception in 2005 and, according to navigation app maker Skobbler, boasts greater accuracy in England, Russia and Germany than rivals such as Google Maps.  I tried the site and found an accurate drawing of my father's ancestral town Tal'ne, Ukraine.  Almost every country is available as is most towns
http://openstreetmap.org

Map Archive of Wojskowy Instytut Geograficzny 1919 - 1939
http://english.mapywig.org/news.php

All of the Pinkasim translations are indexed at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pinkas_poland.html

Districts Names (Current) and business contacts http://www.bmb.pl/default.
idbi?lang=e
  

This site is in English and once there, click on "Districts, poviats and provinces".  For the names of the Province's (1975-1998) http://www.rootsweb.com/
~polwgn/polandgen.html

Once there scroll to "Where did the former province of ____ go?"

Dzielnica

A city quarter or district.

Dzielnica Stare Miasto"

Old city  

Gmina

Hamlet

Guberniya

State

Gorod

 

 Palatynat

Used during the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, (from the Latin word palatinate) was used and means province

Powiat (Russian) Uyezd

Districts or County

Voyevodship also Guberniya

Province

Volost

Hamlet

Wies

Village

Wojewodztwo (Woj.)

 


Aleksandrow Lodzki

A town in Lódzkie Voivodship and belongs to Łódź agglomeration. According to data gathered on 20 May 2002, the town had a population of 20,220.  Located in central Poland and founded in 1818. The first Jewish residents were under the jurisdiction of the Lutomiersk Kahal, but an independent community was established in 1830 by Jews who came from Lutomiersk. In 1826 the governor of the Polish Congress Kingdom granted the community a privilege permitting them to reside and acquire property in specified areas of the town. The Jewish population of Aleksandrow Lodzki numbered around 1,000 in the 1850s; 1,673 (27.9% of the total population) in 1879; 3,061 (24.1%) in 1909; and 2,635 (31.9%) in 1921.
http://www.aleksandrow-lodzki.pl/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksandr%C3%B3w_%C5%81%C3%B3dzki

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lodz/LARG.htm


  Maps

http://maps.google

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksandr%C3%B3w_%C5%81%C3%B3dzki

Research
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/LARG.htm

Yizkor Book
http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1896

http://www.danwymanbooks.com/kehila.htm

http://www.zchor.org/hityiz.htm

http://www.yivoinstitute.org/index.php?tid=66&aid=125

For information contact Joe Ross joeross1220@comcast.net


Amschenov  (Amschinov, also Mszczonow)

A town in Zyrardów County, Masovian Voivodeship, Poland, with 6,310 inhabitants (2004). The town had a Jewish community, and it was once the center of the Hasidic Amshinov -The current Rabbi lives in Israel. This was the center of the Amschinover Chasidim.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amshinov
  

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zyrardow/zyrardow.html


Andrychow

There was a tannery operated by the Mittler family that supplied leather for shoes throughout Europe.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-zXhrHS8xo

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/andrychow/5,history/

http://www.polishjews.org/shoahtts/042.htm


Anin

Located near Warsaw.  On Poprzeczna Street, the Nazis shot 45 Jews in July of 1942.
http://www.maplandia.com/poland/mazowieckie/warszawa/anin/

http://collections.ushmm.org/artifact/image/b00/00/b0000006.pdf

http://www.the-webcam-network.com/Poland/Anin/2013760.html

http://itouchmap.com/?c=pl&UF=-492313&UN=-702611&DG=PPL

http://www.holocaustchronicle.org/HC_Index.html


Annopol

A video, with music displaying the town and the surrounding area as it is today.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OqiQZAOWMI 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annopol_ (disambiguation)  There appears to be more than one Annopol in Poland. Click on the link that you are most interested in and it will take you directly to the site.


   Maps

http://www.mapofpoland.net/Annopol,map.html


Yizkor Book
"
Rachov-Annopol; Pirkei edut ve-Zikaron" (Rachov-Annopol; Testimony and Remembrance)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Annoslaw  (now Woj. L~o'dzkie) 

During the Russian partition period it was in Piotrkow Guberniya.
http://www.polishjews.org/places/001.htm

http://newsarch.rootsweb.com/th/read/RUSSIA/1999-09/0936899704


Antopol

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/belarus/antopol.html

Holocaust
Jews were killed in the ghetto in the 'aktion' of late July, 1942.

http://stevemorse.org/bereza-and-antopol/ant_poi.htm

http://stevemorse.org/bereza-and-antopol/ant-hist0.htm


Augustow (Agustov, Augustov, Oygstova, Yagestov,  Yagistov,  Yagustow,  Yagustova, Yogostool)                                                                                      

A town in Bialystok province, Poland Jewish presence: from 1630 Jewish Population in 1939: 4,000
 

Holocaust
Fate of Jews during WWII: in 1941 the Nazis occupied the town, and executed 1,000 men in the forests. A ghetto was established, from which Jews were deported. Camps and information about the modern town: 
http://www.suwalki.tpnet.pl/umaug/ramkiang.htm

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0002_0_01604.html


   Maps

Augustow (Pojezierze Mazurskie
www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~feefhs/maps/ruse

Photo
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/20178136

Yizkor Book
by Yoga Rittman, NY "Augustow aka Pojezierze Mazurskie
http://www.memo.com/jgsr/database/augustow.cgi


 Aurelow

http://www.zchor.org/lodztown.htm

http://www.zchor.org/hitachdut/losta.htm

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/LARGtown.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00052.html


Bachowice

Located near Oswiecim (Auschwitz

History

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/wadowice/5,history/

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/wadowice/5,history/?action=view&page=1


   Maps

http://www.mapquest.com/cgi-bin/ia_find?link=ia-map-result&event=find_select&level=5


Bagnowka

Cemetery
http://www.jewishmag.com/143mag/bialystok_poland_bagnowka_jewish_cemetery/bialystok
_poland_bagnowka_jewish_cemetery.htm

http://www.zchor.org/tomek.htm

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~polczest/wwadowice1.html


Baligrod

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/baligrod/pages/Index.html


Baranovicz

Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Itzhak Zukerman 

http://www.uoregon.edu/~rkimble/Mirweb/Itzkowitz1.html

http://www.genealogy.org.il/links.htm

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lyakhovichi/MigrationTables6.htm

http://www.cet.ac.il/terezin/dapeijane98.htm


Barcin

The Jewish cemetery in Barcin is located on Podgorna street. The cemetery was completely destroyed during the World War II. It's full of rubbish and digs because of an illegal sand extraction. No sign of the cemetery remained
http://fodz.pl/?d=10&id=45&l=en


Barwinek

Located right on the Slovak border, but still in Poland, it is actually an official border crossing between the two countries.
http://www.agcholocaustlibrary.org/ghettos.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol3_00221.html

http://turystyka.karpaty.dukla.pl/start.php?dzial=10&lang=en


Bedzin (Bendin

http://www.avihuronen.com/english/articles/eng-judenrat.html

Yizkor Book
"Pinkas Bendin"
 
(A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Bendin) The Jews Of Bedzin
http://www.avihuronen.com/english/articles/bedzin/eng-bedzin-notes.html


http://www.isragen.org.il/YIZ/Rambam_books.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bedzin/BedPh000.html


Belchatow  (Pol. Belchatów)

18141307219641762099.JPG
Jews in front of the ghetto
http://www.drohobyczer-zeitung.com/2012/10/drohobych-during-period-of-nazism-foto.html

The town is  located 27 miles south of Lodz and 13 miles west of Piotrkow Trybunalski in the Piotrkow Guberniya, Lodz Province. Seven Jews are recorded as living in Belchatow in 1764. Jewish settlement increased after the formation of Congress Poland. By 1897 there were 2,897 Jewish residents out of a total population of 3,859, mainly engaged in the flourishing textile industry which developed in the 19th century. In 1921 the Jewish population numbered 3,688 (59% of the total), and in 1939, 6,000, constituting one-third of the total population
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0003_0_02342.html

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Belchatow/ 

Landsmanshaftn
There is an active Landsmanshaftn in the US. Contact is the secretary, Phyllis Bell at:
hilphyl@yahoo.com or Roni Liebowitz Roni19@optonline.net

Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland is Menachem Sharon

Menachem Sharon
27 Bezalel St
Tel Aviv  64683
Israel

Photos
Families, at a meeting of survivors, at Fohrenwald DP Camp and more
http://liebowitzes.com/belchatow/large_group_photos.htm

http://liebowitzes.com/belchatow/fohrenwald.htm

Research
RI-Poland Database website
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl
 

http://liebowitzes.com/belchatow/

Jewish Records Indexing database

Of 5,980 birth, marriages and deaths from 1809 to 1899 
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/belchatow.htm
   

Yizkor Book
Translation page at the JewishGen site and a pamphlet written in Buenos Aires in 1959 by many of the same people who wrote the Yizkor Book.  "Belchatow Yizkor-Bukh" (Belchatow Memorial Book  Two Chapters from  
"
A
Ruined Garden"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html


Belyy Kamen

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/belyi-kamen.html

http://genealogy.imstumped.com/places.shtml

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records 

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 


Belz

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNKNypH1Juo&feature=player_embedded

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMkLikWK8o0&feature=related

Cemetery
http://belz-austrian-empire.blogspot.com/2008/01/belz-cemetery.html

Necrology List
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belz/bel519.html

Research
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74 


Belzec

This town had a site to exterminate Jews by carbon monoxide poisoning through truck exhausts.  When this was found to be "too slow", the inmates were transferred to Auschwitz and the actual extermination site was plowed under by 1943.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/Belzec.html

Holocaust
http://www.deathcamps.org/belzec/labourcamps.html

http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/ar/labour%20camps/arclabourcamps.html

http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007206


Belzyce

The Belzyce Town Hall Archives turned  over a large set of 19th century Jewish registers to the Lublin branch of the Polish State Archives. 

The  additional registers include births, marriages and deaths for the years 1882-1886 and 1891-1902. These will be added to the 1865 registers which were already housed in Lublin but not filmed by the Mormons.  Earlier years which were filmed by the Mormons are already on-line 
www.jri-poland.org

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/belzyce-lubelskie.html

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/belzyce/5,history/

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0003_0_02383.html


Berezhany (Brzeziny, Brzezany, Brezany, Byeryezhany)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

This town is located in Eastern Galicia or Western Ukraine formerly in USSR 1944-1991, Poland 1920-1939 and Austria-Hungary 1172-1918 and is the district center in Ternopil region which is in the heart of Galicia.  The town site information, the history of medieval town, photographs and an electronic street maps of the town, and more
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm
 

The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book
"The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the
18th Century"

Authored by M. J. Rosman amounted to 1,270.

Berezhany District - site contains list, descriptions of all villages, photos and history
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/zemla.htm

History
Update from
"History of the Jews in the Bukowina,"
("Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina,") 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html
 

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
  

Birth Records - 1864-1898
Marriage Records - 1875-1897
Death Records - 1870-1876, 1882-1895

Memorial page to bygone world of Berezhany Jews
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/brzezaner.htm

Surname List
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/brzezanysurn.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/berezhany/berezhany.html


Beuthen

Located in Upper Silesia in the Katowice province and some 60 miles west, it is an industrial city centered around the coal, zinc, lead and silver mines.

Research
Births
(1867-1935-1937); 
Deaths
1867-1940;
Burials
1741-1939;
Marriages
1880-1995 records are at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Bialaczow

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Biala Podolska

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Avraham Gvirtz 
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Bialobrzegi

A town in Poland in the Masovian Volvodeship and is about 60 km south of Warsaw.  It is the capital of Bialobrzegi County.


   Maps
 

http://www.maplandia.com/poland/podkarpackie/lancut/bialobrzegi/

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.

Yizkor Book
http://www.mathsci.appstate.edu/~sjg/yizkor.html


Bialy Kamien

Nearby to Gologory.

Cemetery
There were at least 844 burials in all six Bialy Kamien Landsmanshaftn plots in the New York area.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/bialykamiensurn.htm


http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74 

Surname list
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-Pl/psa/bialykamiensurn.htm

http://www.halgal.com/bkparish.html

Vital Records
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-Pl/psa/bialykamiensurn.htm


Bialobrzegi

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Bialystok  (Bialystok is Polish, Bielostock is in Russian)


Synagogue in Dubno 1910
http://chelm.freeyellow.com/dubnomemorial.html

In 1906-1907) it belonged to the Russian Empire. Today Bialystok belongs to Poland. The town, until the Holocaust, had a large Jewish population, depending on the source of the information - something like 40% of the total population. became part of Prussia in the 3rd partition of Poland) and 1808 when it became part of Grodno Guberniya, Russian Empire

One of the principal Russian Polish Jewish centers (in Russian: Belostok), incorporated into Russia between 1807 and 1921 and administrated by the U.S.S.R. between 1939 and 1941, reverting to Poland in 1945
bialystok.htm

The Steven Spielberg Jewish Film Archive's Virtual Cinema has footage of Jewish Life In Bialystok
http://www.spielbergfilmarchive.org.il/kv/index.html

A description of a visit to Bialystok after WWII by a survivor is available at:
http://www.zabludow.com/yiskor7DavidZabludovsky.html


Books

   

"The Moses of Rovno"
 Authored by Douglas Huneke and published by Dodd Mead, 1st edition, 1985
 
"Among the Enemy"
Authored by Sam Genirberg and published by Robertson Publishing, 2012

"The Immortal Spirit, The Bialystok Hebrew Gymnasium, Poland, 1919-1939"
Authored by Yaacov Samid, and translated from Hebrew to English by Stanley Hillel.  The Hebrew Gymnasium in Bialystok was the first school outside of Palestine where all subjects both religious and secular were taught entirely in Hebrew.  It had many graduates that went on to become well known including Yitzhok Shamir, and during the war many of it's students and teachers formed the nucleus of the Jewish underground in Bialystok which launched an uprising in August of 1943.

"Killing Hitler"
Authored by Roger Moorehouse, Chapter 7  and published by Bantam, 2007

"Dubna rabati: Toldot ha-'ir Dubna ... gedole ha-'ir"
Authored by H. Z. Margolioth and published in Warsaw, 1910

"Dubno in the Wake of Khmel'nyts'kyi"
Authored by Moshe Rosman and published in 2003 pages 239-255

"Krov ikh i segodnya govorit"
Authored by Samuil Gil, and published in New York, 1995

"Dubno: Kehilah she-hayetah ve-enenah"
Authored by Avraham Cohen,  and published in Tel Aviv, 1984

"Dubno: Sefer Zikaron"
Authored by Ya'akov Adini, ed., and published Tel Aviv, 1966 in Hebrew and Yiddish

"Dubno" in Pinkas ha-kehilot: Polin
 Authored by Shmuel Spector, ed., vol. 5, pages 55-61and published in Jerusalem, 1990


Bialystok Cemetery information
An index is developed (of between 6,000 to 7,000 tombstones) that still exist in the cemetery enter "Bialystok Cemetery Project"
http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/tomek/bialystok-07.htm

http://vimeo.com/11440016

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~archpop

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Michael Fliker

Museum
Zlota Macewa Project, Bialystok, Poland
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/links.htm

Photo of Synagogue
http://members.tripod.com/~mikerosenzweig/polsynagog.htm

http://members.core.com/~mikerose/polsynagog.htm

Research
There is a list of Bialystok voters at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/surnames/bialysto.htm

Database search for Bialystok
www.rtrfoundation.org   
Once there, you will see the index of Jewish Records pertaining to Bialystok and which archive the records are stored in. To obtain copies of the records, check out the Belarus SIG and JRI-Poland databases. If they are not available there, you will either have to go to Grodno and Bialystok or, hire a private researcher.

A great deal of information is available at  
http://www.zchor.org/bialystok/bialystok.htm
  (in Hebrew)

http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/bialystok/bialystok.html

bialystok.htm

Yizkor Book
The Center offers copies of the Yizkor Book for sale. An inventory of on-line records for Bialystok
The Bialystok Center is located at
228 E. Broadway
New York, NY 10002.  
Phone 212 475 7755
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/bialy.htm
 
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

http://www.zchor.org/bialystok/bialystok.htm

http://www.zchor.org/bialystok/yizkor.htm

http://www.slcl.org/branches/hq/sc/yiz-a-c.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/projectdesc/YB_bialystok.html

http://www.zchor.org/bialystok/yizkor2.htm


Bialystok Province

In the first few weeks of November, 1942, as part of German Operation Rhinehard, the liquidation of all the Jewish communities in the countryside of Bialystok Province was ordered.  In most of these towns, the Jewish population had been kept in small ghetto's for 15 or 16 months, and had faced many abuses and tortures. 

The Jewish populations were removed and taken to temporary transit camps such as the former camp of the Polish Tenth Calvary in Bialystok.  From these temporary 'concentration' camps they were in a matter of days or weeks, sent by rail, to Treblinka where almost all were gassed and burned on the same day of their arrival. Almost 100,000 Jews from Bialystok Province were wiped out in this manner during November of 1942.  The Bialystok Ghetto remained open until August of 1943, due in large part to the value of it's slave labor.  Most of the participants in this horrific crime against humanity never received any justice - none! 
The previous information was obtained from a posting by Tilford Bartman bartmant@earthlink.net
http://www.zabludow.com    


Bielsk Podlaski

Web site
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bielsk_Podlaski/


Bielsko-Biala

Located about 15 km. to the west of Brest Litovsk. On June 29, 1942 the Nazis herded up the Jews of this town. P. B. Dorman representing "The Polish Jews"  knows of records of Jews deported to Biala Podlaska and Jews transported from Biala Podlaska to Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Warsaw, Brzesc, Siedlce, Janow Podlaski Community in Bielsko-Biala Podlaski.
http://jewpol.home.ml.org
 

Bielsk-Podlaski

The Bielsk ShtetLinks page is located at 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bielsk_Podlaski/


The site contains a listing of all legible headstones in the old Jewish cemetery of  Bielsk.  There are also a number of photos of surviving headstones. The site includes the 1930 business directory pages covering Bielsk, and a brief  introduction to the history of Bielsk.

The site contains other source material listing natives of Bielsk including materials from the Bielsker Bruderlicher Untershtitzungs Verein. A number of photos of the town have also been added.  The site also contains a section for photos of families from Bielsk.  Contact is Andrew Blumberg ablumberg@yahoo.com

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Michael Mechaof  
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74
 

Research
Article about Gerda Weissmann Klein's memories of her youth in Bielsko
http://www.jewishcommunityheroes.org/nominees/profile/gerda-klein/

Department of Documentation History Skr. poczt.
180 ul. 3 Maja Str.
No. 7  43-300 Bielsko-Biala  Poland 
Tel. +48 33 8122438 
Fax: +48 33 8126654 
Email: gwz@bb.onet.pl
 


Bieszczady Region

Today it is a popular tourist destination.  Photographs of the area are available. To see the click on the various links, then on the resultant pages click on the link at the bottom.
http://fizyka.phys.put.poznan.pl/~spoon/karp.htm
   


Biezun

Yizkor Book
There are 188 entries

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Yizkor

The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs -- published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the Yizkor Book Project site at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
 

This database is only an index of names; it directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more complete information may be available. This database currently contains over 186,000 entries from the necrologies of 210 different Yizkor Books.


Bilgoraj 

Province of Zamosc, Lublin Guberniya and is in the south of the Lubelskie province.  


   Maps


http://www.rootsweb.com/~pollubel/powbilg.html


Biskupice

Had a Jewish presence
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/de/city/biskupice/

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/biskupice-lubelskie.html


Blahowna

Located at 50.36 north and 15.27 east. Site is in Polish but can be translated by Google
http://www.polskastrefa.eu/geolista,9552,biala_rawska_7.html


Blaszki

 http://www.pharao.com/cam/Europe/Poland/?Blaszki/transportation.html 


Bobrka (Bobrka) Bobrce, Boiberke

The Jewish Records Indexing Poland indexed records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow.  Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns.  Records are from 1863 to 1900. The town is near Krosno and Zmigrod in Western Galicia according to a translation of the Polish "Slownik Geograficzny" published between 1880 and 1902.

The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records and the estimated cost of Indexing and the current status at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Birth Records
1863, 1865, 1872-1876, 1878-1900
Marriage Records

1866-1867, 1871-1873, 1875
Death Records
None

ShtetLinks page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bobrka/default.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bobrka/bobrka.html


Bodzentyn

At the time of WW II, there were about 1,000 Jews in Bodzentyn.  Only a few escaped the ghetto's liquidation in 1942.  This site offers an impressive insight into this shtetl with photos and shows the caring of Jews to restore the cemetery.  Worth your time to spend time on this site whether you have roots here or not.
http://www.bodzentyn.net/

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Bogoria

A small town (only 575 Jews in 1897) in Sandomierz Powiat (district) of Radom Guberniya Complete extracts of all Jewish marriages from 1826 to 1877 as extracted by Warren Blatt
http://www.jewishgen.org//krsig 

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including:
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages. 


Boguslawow

Located near Rozanka in Nowogrodek (Novogrodek) Province in Pre-war Poland
http://www.crarg.org/surnames-poland-jewish-records.php
 

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Cracow.html

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/belarus/rozhanka.html


Boguslawy

Located near Bieniakonie in Nowogrodek (Novogrodek) Province in Pre-war Poland

Holocaust
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Polish_Jews

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auschwitz_concentration_camp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warsaw_concentration_camp


Bohorodczay - Brotchin


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities


Bolchow (Bolechow, Bolekhov)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Included in the JRI-PL database - now located in Ukraine.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Shlomo Adler 
 
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists
Births, Marriages, Deaths records from 1877-1898

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0004_0_03266.html

Birth Records - 1877-1898
Marriage Records - none
Death Records - 1877-1898

ShtetLinks page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bolekhov/

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bolekhov/bolekhov.html


Bolimow

Cemetery
http://www.iajgs.org/cemetery/poland/bolimow-skiermewickiewarsawa.html


Boleslaw

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Borislav (Boryslaw, Borisov)

See also my Ukraine Shtetls and my Galicia pages

Cemetery
There is a Jewish cemetery in existence for the past 200 years.  More information about the cemetery can be obtained from William Fern Whfern@aol.com

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0004_0_03343.html

Holocaust
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/Chronology_1942.html

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/04.html

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records from 1878 - 1899 and the estimated cost of Indexing and the current status at 

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Birth Records - 1878-1889, 1894-1899
Marriage Records - none
Death Records - 1878-1899

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Borislav/Borislav.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Drohobycz/dro171.html


Borishchev (Borshchev, Borszczow)

Formerly in Poland and now in Ukraine - The JRI-Poland  / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records from 1846-1898
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Research
Birth Records
- 1873-1875, 1877-1894
Marriage Records - 1846-1876
Death Records - 1877-1898

ShtetLinks Page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Borschev/borschev.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/borszczow/borszczow.html


http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol2_00102.html


Bostonow

Formerly in Poland and now in Ukraine - The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records from 1846-1898

Cemetery
http://jewishgraveyardrabbit.blogspot.com/2009/02/poland-new-catalog-of-jewish-cemeteries.html

History
http://www.calvin.edu/academic/pols/news/politeia/2009/newsletterSpring2009.pdf


Branszczyk

List of Jewish Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id27.html


Brest - (In Polish: Brzesc-nad Bulgemi)

Located about 120 miles east of Warsaw -near the Bug river and just north of the Ukrainian border. 

Brest was formerly known as Brest-Litovsk and the first mention was in 1019 as Berestye.  It became part of The Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and later, part of PolandRussia reverted Brest to Poland in 1919.  From 1944, Brest became a part of USSR (Byelorussian Socialist Republic) which a few years ago, became an  independent country Belarus. 
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Belarus/brest.htm


Books

"Encyclopedia of the Jewish Diaspora"
Volume 2 has been updated                                              


Photo of Brest (Brzese) Synagogue 
http://members.tripod.com/~mikerosenzweig/polsynagog.htm
 

http://members.core.com/~mikerose/polsynagog.htm

Research
The Brest Ghetto Passport Archive 
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/brest.htm
  

Litovsk Passport database story  
http://www.jta.org/page_view_story.asp?strwebhead=
Internet+archive+lists+Nazi+victims&
intcategoryid=5  

(Note: you may have to do a cut and paste

Yizkor Book
This City has its own web site with much information  
http://www.brestonline.com/


Breslau (see Wroclaw)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a6/Old_Jewish_Cemetery_of_Wroclaw_%28Poland%29_-_German_Grave35.jpg

Located at one time in the Posen Province. Jewish Community Email: address:
wroclaw@jewish.org.pl   They offer limited help and have documents about the burial names in the large Kosel cemetery.  The archive and the university library have address and phone books from 1880 until 1940

http://www.jewish-guide.pl/sites/wroclaw

Cemetery
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Old_Jewish_Cemetery_of_Wroclaw_(Poland)_-_German_Grave35.jpg


Brodnica

Cemetery
The cemetery is located on Podgorna Street
was founded in the late 18th century. It was destroyed during the War, no gravestones remained. It's partially built over now.
http://fodz.pl/?d=10&w=2&l=en


Brody  

During the time period between WWI to WWII this town was located in Poland now in Ukraine

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Lilian Finka
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/glubokoye/glu_pages/glu_archives.html
  

Photo of Brody Synagogue 
http://members.tripod.com/~mikerosenzweig/polsynagog.htm
 

http://members.core.com/~mikerose/polsynagog.htm


Brok

Russian Era Indexing of Poland Project
1826-1865 in the LDS microfilms of the Jewish vital records of Brok
http://www.jewishgen.org/reipp


Brzesko (Briegel)

A medium sized town on the main road halfway between Krakow and Tarnow.  Many of its residents left  following the big fire of 1904.  The Mormons have the birth and marriage registrations records from 1864-1876. The office of civilian affairs there has the records from 1876 onwards.


Books

A personal story of the deportation and liquidation of the Brzesko Jewish community is discussed by a woman who was there.  Most were killed in Belzec.  Mrs. Ester Spagatner Friedman published her memoirs which she wrote in Polish immediately after WW2. The book was published in Poland and is titled
"Daleka Droga Do Domu"

(You can find through Google). It was also published in Hebrew.  It contains many details about Brzesko, Krakow, schools, Plaszow, Auschwitz and Birkenau. Video
http://www.emuzyka.pl/piosenki/Coma,Daleka-droga-do-domu,126913.html


Brzeziny

Yizkor Book
http://interfam.net/brzeziny-yizkor.html


Brzeznica (Nowa)

Located 21 km west of Radomsko. Records for the years 1816 to 1864.  A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya-  JRI-Poland Database website
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl

http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Brzhotik (Brzostek)

Located east of Krakow and southeast of Tarnow
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/sl_brzostek.htm


Brzosdowce

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel built by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum.
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm


Buchach (Buczacz)

Located near Brzezany.

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Ester Cohen 
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74  

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records and the estimated cost of Indexing and the current status at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html 

Birth Records
1849, 55, 59, 60, 63, 65, 66, 69, 71, 72, 1875-89-90

ShtetLinks page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Buchach/buchach.html


Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/buchach/buchach.html


Budanov (Budzanow)

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records and the estimated cost of Indexing and the current status at 

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Birth Records
1867-1875, 1877-1896
Marriage Records

None
Death Records

1877-1889

The JRI-Poland/Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths Records
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

ShtetLinks Page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Budanov/budanov.html


Bukachevtsy

Once in Poland and now in Ukraine. The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths Records 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Research
Birth Records
1865-1876
Marriage Records
None
Death Records
None

ShtetLinks Page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bukaczowce/bukmain.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol2_00089.html


Bukowsko (Bakavsk, Bikavsk, Bikovsk, Bukovska, Bukivs'ko)

Located 196.6 miles South Southeast of Warsaw

Debbie Raff seraph@dc.rr.com  has a web site "Bukowsko A shtetl in Poland" which includes maps, etc.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bukowsko 

A newsgroup at  
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bukowsko_triangle/

Yizkor Book
Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, Volume III


Burshtyn  (Bursztyn) Burshtyn)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html 

Research
Birth Records

1848-1873, 1877-1898
Marriage Records

1849-1875, 1878-1899
Death Records

1848-1882, 1884-1896


Burzenin

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/?a=showCity&action=view&cat_id=3&city_id=529&lang=en_GB

For information contact Joe Ross joeross1220@comcast.net


Busko-Zdroj (Brzesko Nowe)

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya.  Once located in the Kielce Guberniya
http://www.iajgs.org/cemetery/poland/busko-kielce.html

Research
There are birth and death records for the years 1886-1900, excluding 1889 and 1891.  The marriage records are for the years 1886, 1893-1900. There are also information for neighboring towns that are also part of the Pinczow project.

www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/psa/psapinczow.htm


Bydgoszcz (Bromberg)

This town was previously known as Bromberg.
http://www.pharao.com/cam/Europe/Poland/?Blaszki/transportation.html
  

Homepage in Polish is 
www.bydgoszcz.pl
   

The State Archive in Bydgoszcz
85-009 Bydgoszcz, ul. Dworcowa 65, 
Dyrektor Dr Janusz Kutta  
Phone: (0-52) 22 35 11; 
Sekretariat (0-52) 22 96 76 w. 33
 
http://ciuw.warman.net.pl/

Cemetery
The Jewish cemetery located on 103 Szubinska Street was founded in the 19th century. It was completely devastated during the War. Nothing from the cemetery remained to the present days. The Jewish cemetery in Bydgoszcz was located on 2 Filarecka St. After the necropolis there is no trace left.
http://fodz.pl/?d=10&id=46&l=en

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Mordechai Rubinstein
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74
 


Bytom (formerly Beuthen)

There are some Jews living in this town today according to Iisai8v10@actcom.co.il   Katowice region  (Dabrowka Wlk.) The notes to some LDS films filed under Bytom/Beuthen read "Roman Catholic parish registers of births, marriages, and deaths for Holy Trinity Parish in Beuthen, Silesia, Germany. The records name Dombrowa, which is part of the city of Beuthen, and Orzegow, a neighboring town."

Just to add to the confusion, the map shows Dabrowka Ml. (with an accent over the 'o' and a slash through the l) as a suburb of Katowice as well as the town Dabrowa Gornicza  and a village Dabrowa just east of Myslowice.  There is no more than 20km between all 4 places.  The Beuthen suburb was part of Prussian "Upper Silesia", as opposed to Austrian Galicia or Russian Poland. From a posting by Rodney Eisfelder 
eisfelderr@ACSLINK.AONE.NET.AU

 
Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.

There are 34 or more researchers listed for people researching the families from this town. Vital and related records at
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl
   

Also, contact Lance Ackerfield of Kibbutz Yiftah, in Israel for information on joining the Shtetl Co-op
Lancea@israsrv.net.il
  

Holocaust
Translation of unpublished list prepared in 1942:
"Jews deported from Beuthen (Bytom) Upper Silesia" 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bytom_Synagogue


Bzury

One of the cruelest murders of Jewish women occurred here when some Polish men from Szczuczyn raped some 20 Jewish women in a local forest before killing them and stealing their clothes.
http://radzilow.com/tygodnik.htm


Cebrow (Tsebrov)

http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameDetails.html?itemId=1684925&language=en

Ellis Island Ship Manifest with names of passengers from Cebrow 

http://www.ellisisland.org/search/viewTextManifest.asp?MID=10187472200242331296&order_num=1850062885&ORDER_ID=1600197627&p
ID=101869080185&lookup=101869080211

http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameDetails.html?itemId=1684925&language=en

Ellis Island Ship Manifest with names of passengers from Cebrow  (Austria )

http://www.ellisisland.org/search/viewTextManifest.asp?MID=10187472200242331296&order_num=1850062885&ORDER_ID=1600197627&pID=
101869080185&lookup=101869080211

http://stevemorse.org/goulnik/match1.php?time=0&mode=running&LNM=kucharski&FNM=mi&kind=exact&
last_kind=0&first_kind=1&fld=%7Cname%7Cyob%7Csmanifest%7Ctown%7Cyoa%7
Cannotations%7Cage%7Cpassrec%7Cimage%7Ctmanifest%7C&referrer=httpwww.jewishgen.orgdatabasesEIDBellis.html&dwpdone=1

http://www.immigrantships.net/v6/1900v6/patricia1907scans/transcription2.txt


Checiny - Brzesko Nowe

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig

Complete extracts of all Jewish marriages in this city from 1868 - 1884 transcribed into English, has over 700 records and includes surrounding towns of Chmielnik, Kielce, Nowy Korczyn, Lopuszno, Przedborz, Radoszyce and Wloszczowa.  

The Kielce-Radom SIG Journal
http://www.jewishgen.org//krsig  

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.


Chelm  (Chelmza)

A small town in eastern Poland.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm/che265.html

A very good article in the January 2004 issue of Geographical magazine (in Hebrew) is entitled
"
The Wise Men of Chelm" which details a description of this small town, its legends, its history and present, with photographs.  The article ends with a quote from Beshvis Zinger's story "Shlumiel Man of
Chelm
".
http://www.masa.co.il/

Cemetery
The old Jewish cemetery in Chelmza was located on 3 Maja street and was completely destroyed during the World War II. It's built over now
http://fodz.pl/?d=10&id=346&l=en

Landsmanshaft
There was a Jewish Presence: From 1442.  Jewish Population in 1939: Approx. 15,000. Fate of Jews during WWII: Starting with German occupation, Jews forced on death marches, and deported in massive "Aktionen" to Sobibor death camp. Only 15 survived. see:
Communal History  Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Avraham Beker 

http://www.jewish-chelm.org

Yizkor-Bukh Chelm
(Commemoration book Chelm
http://www.klezmershack.com/articles/winkler/yizkorlinks.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

http://www.slcl.org/branches/hq/sc/yiz-a-c.htm


Chelmo

Holocaust
Death Camp for "Total Extermination"
Lists the testimonies of the last prisoners and list of the Jewish Communities liquidated in Chelmo

http://weber.ucsd.edu/~lzamosc/gchelmno.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chelmno_extermination_camp

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/poland/Chelmno/Tour01.html


Cheremishni Colony

In 1919, there 8 Jewish homes
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/04.html


Chislavichi  (Choslavichi, Khislavichi, Khoslavichi)

Mogilev Gubernia

1.Vitebsk 2.Senno 3.Chareya 4.Pogrebenki 5.Babinovichi 6.Lubavichi 7. Rudnya 8.Krupki 9.Bobr 10.Tolochin 11.Lezuny 12.Smolyny. 13.Orsha 14.Dubrovna 15.Kozyany 16.Lyady 17.Krasniy 18.Smolensk 19.Romanovo 20.Kopys 21.Shklov 22.Zastenki 23.Gorki 24.Teterin 25. Monastyrshchina 26.Choslavichi 27.Belynichi 28.Lokuty 29.Shamovo 30.Mstislavl 31.Petrovichi 32.Mogilev 33.Ryasna 34.Roslavl 35.Vilchitzy 36.Chaussy 37.Malyatichi 38.Shumovka 39.Sidorovichi 40.Pridorozhye 41.Krichev 42.Khotovizh 43.Zvenchatka 44.Klimovichi 45.Stariy Bychov 46.Cherikov 47.Pribor 48.Propoysk 49.Chechevichi 50.Seletz 51.Obidovichi 52.Svenskopole 53.Krasnopolye 54.Khotimsk 55.Kostukovichi 56.Godilovichi 57.Vydrynka 58.Rogachev 59.Zhlobin 60.Chechersk 61.Buda-Lushevskaya 62.Ubarovichi 63.Vetka 64.Starodub 65.Gomel 66.Dobrush 67.Belitza

"The Jews just resided there in the period of Russian-Swedish war (1700-1721), and in the year of 1766
in addition to gentiles it had a
Jewish population of 237. From after the first partition of Poland in 1772 and the establishment of Russian Empire's authority over surrounding territories until 1918 it belonged to the
Mstislavl District (
uyezd) of Mogilev Province (gubernia) and was its biggest shtetl, except 
Mstislavl itself. In 1847, according to an "audit" of that year, its Jewish community numbered 2205, and 50 years later, according to the 1897 census, the Jews numbered 3901 (out of a total population of 5066). Approximately in the same period, there were 2 churches, 1 official synagogue (in reality, at least 8), 1 Jewish primary school and 1 yeshiva. In the pre-school period the children made their first steps to Jewish knowledge in numerous
heders. The shtetl's owner, the earl Saltykov, was good to the Jews and even tried to protect them, when in the 1840-s they were persecuted as part of the so-called "Mstislavl uproar". He provided assistance to their representatives pleading in St. Petersburg for the Mstislavl Jewish population. The Jewish residents of Chislavichi were mainly day-laborers, artisans and petty merchants. In 1891 there were 3 tanneries, 2
groats producing factories and 3 creameries.
Chislavichi is shown on the original Russian map of Mogilev gubernia (under #26),

shl2gur.tripod.com/Chislavichi_files/Chislavichi.htm


Chodziez (Colmar, Chodziesen. Kolmar)

Until 1877 the town was called Chodziesen. From 1877 it was Colmar or KolmarThe current Polish name of the town is Chodziez and it is situated approximately 65km north of Poznan. 

Cemetery

http://www.iajgs.org/cemetery/poland/chodziez.html 


  Maps

http://www.polishroots.com/GeographyMaps/SlownikGeograficzny/SGKPChodziez/
tabid/105/Default.aspx
 


Chmielnik

18 miles southeast of Pilov (Pulawy) - Brzesko Nowe.  A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


 Books
 
 

"The Sara's Children"
Authored by Suzan Hagstrom. In 1946 a pogrom occurred and this is one of the events described


History
Jewish Life in Poland
http://web.me.com/e.lips/Eli_in_London/Blog/Entries/2009/3/20_Entry_1.html

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Nachum Mali

Research

There was an offer to lookup individual marriages for this shtetl was made by David Price at
dprice@sympatico.ca on a "if free time available" basis.

There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including:
Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn,  Olesnica,  Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow,  Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages.

http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Chodecz (Khodech)

Located in the Wloclawek area of the historical Polish Kujawy region. Chodecz is located roughly a half way between Lodz and Wloclawek.  Poland did not exist as the independent country in 1864, and this particular part of country has been in Russian hands. There also was in existence Prussian and Austrian Poland.
http://london.iwm.org.uk/server/show/ConWebDoc.4798

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/?a=showCity&action=view&cat_id=5&city_id=809&lang=en
_GB


Chodrow (Chodorow, Khodorov)

Bobrka District, Lwów Province.  This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel  created by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum. 
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm

http://www1.yadvashem.org/yv/en/education/newsletter/16/chodorow.asp

http://www.maltwood.uvic.ca/tmr/synagogue.html


Chodziesen (See Chodzez)

Located in the Poznan (Posen) region has been renamed to Prussian Kolmar in 1886.  Following the end of WW II and redrawing country maps, the town has been re-named to Polish Chodzez (pronounced Kho dzheh zh)
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/?a=showCity&id=13697&city_id=1380&action=viewtable&cat_id=10&lang=en_GB

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standesamt_Margonin


Chomentow - (Brzesko Nowe)

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Chortkov (Czortkow)   Ukrainian Shtetls

Once in Poland and now in Ukraine.  The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Birth Records
1874-1898
Marriage Records
None
Death Records

1884-1898

ShtetLinks Page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Chortkov/chortkov.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chortkov/Chortkov.html


Chorzele

JRI-Poland Database
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl 


Chrzanow

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Shoshanna Hirshberg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrzan%C3%B3w

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krakow/chrzanow_trzebinia/chrzanow_trzebinia
_index.htm

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Chrzanow; Lebn un umkum fun a Yiddish shtetl" (Chrzanow; the life and destruction of a Jewish shtetl)


Ciechanöw  (Chechanow)

Located 7 km north northwest of Warsaw. Vital research data is held in the Mlawa Archive. 

Community
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Ciechanow/

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Yosef Klapus
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74  

Photos
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/ciechanow/photogallery/

Research
The Ciechanow
web page can be found at 

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ciechanow/
 

There is quite a bit of material available within the web page, including the history, maps,  photos of those who perished and an Index of Surnames as well as the 1923 Business Directory.  Also, Marriage Records from 1826-1865

Jewish Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id35.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.ihtml


Ciepielow

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya 

Cemetery
http://www.iajgs.org/cemetery/poland/ciepielow.html

Holocaust
http://www.savingjews.org/perished/k.htm


Cisie

Located at 50.33 north 15.28 east
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cisie,_Mi%C5%84sk_County

Holocaust
http://www.holocaustforgotten.com/list.htm


Cmielow 

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  

http://www.jewishcurrents.org/2009_mar_newman.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinkas_poland/pol7_00420.html  


Crakow (Cracow)

See also Krakow 
http://www.pharao.com/cam/Europe/Poland/?Blaszki/transportation.html 


Czeladz

Included in JewishGen's ShtetLinks site 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/
 

Yizkor Book
Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland, vol. 5
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html


Czestochowa

 

 

 


 

 




 

 

 

Czestochowa.html

Czestochowa1.html

 

A city located about 124 miles southwest of Warsaw.  The Jewish community was founded in 1765 with about 75 souls.  It had grown to 500 by 1808 and when WWII came about, there were 28,500 Jews living in the city. In 1858, there some 3,000 Jews, forming a third of the total population.  In 1939, there were 28,500 Jews at the beginning of WWII.

There was a Jewish agricultural training farm and a trade school that was operated during the interwar years. There was a network of religious and secular Jewish schools.


 
Books

"Books of Residents" (or Ksiega Ludnosci.
"This is a hugely valuable resource for anyone with family in the Czestochowa/Radomsko area.  I would take a wild guess and say that anyone who lived in Czestochowa between the 1890s and the 1920s is listed in these books -- along with spouse, children, birth dates, birth places, and sometimes information like marriage dates and immigration.  I have just spent the last few hours putting some samples on the web. I collected these in Czestochowa in May of 2002 Posted by Daniel Kazez 


"The Czenstochov Book"
Authored by M. Schutzmann and published in 2 volumes in Hebrew in Jerusalem
 

"Czenstochov: Our Legacy"
Authored by Harry Klein and published in Montreal in 1993. Available on Google Books

"A Kehilah in Poland during the Inter-War Years"
Authored by W. M. Glicksman and published in Philadelphia, 1969


Army recruit list
At the Czestochowa (Poland) Archives is a list for 1885-1906 and 1909-1913 for Przyrow (near Czestochowa) In all, 504 persons are listed--along with year of birth, names of parents, place of birth, and place of temporary registration. 
http://www.davidrose.us/DavidWebPage/Geneology/CzestRG.html

Cemetery
During the occupation, the Germans carried out executions of Jews at the cemetery, burying their victims in mass graves. Following 1945, Jews who had returned used the cemetery until about 1970.
http://www.zchhor.org/CZESTOCH.HTM

Census of 1792
(The above link includes Czenstochov/Chenstochov) and nearby shtetls:
Janow/Janów
Klobuck
Klomnice
Krzepice
Lelow/Lelów
Mstow/Mstów
Praszka
Przyrow/Przyrów
Szczekociny
Zarki

An indexing of *all* Jewish vital records in the Mormon microfilm collection from the years 1826 to 1835 posted to the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/


 

 Jewish Slave Laborers from Czestochowa (c. 1940 or 1941)

Ghetto
The ghetto was established on April 9, 1941 in the eastern old part of the city and on August 23rd, some twenty thousand Jews from other cities (Lodz, Plock, Krakow) and villages were squeezed into the ghetto which eventually held more than 48,000 souls.  A total of thirty-nine thousand Jews were sent to Treblinka extermination camp - forced into sixty freight cars.  Elderly people in the home for the aged and the children in the orphanage were killed on the spot.  Only two thousand Jews managed to escape or hide in the city.
http://www.czestochowajews.org/eng_ghetto.htm

Holocaust
The Nazis entered the city on September 3, 1939 on the third day of the war, and more than 300 Jews were killed on the following day.  On September 16th, a Judenrat (Jewish Council) was formed, headed by Leon Kopinski.  In August 1940, 1,000 young Jews were sent to Cieszanow forced labor camps and very few survived.

The largest camp in the area was Hasag Pelzery, which functioned from June 1943 until January 16, 1945.  This was a munitions factory employing about five thousand Jews from Poland, Germany, Austria and Bohemia.  There were an average of three thousand Jews also working in the munitions factories of Warta and Czestochhowianka.

When the Soviet army liberated the city, there were still some 5,000 Jews in the area.  In June 1946, 2,167 Jews were living here, but after the Kielce pogrom* on July 4th, many of them joined the Beriha for Palestine.


Jewish Holocaust survivors awaiting transportation to the British Mandate of Palestine

*The Kielce Pogrom was an outbreak of violence against the Jewish community centre in the city of Kielce, Poland on July 4, 1946, initiated by Polish Communist armed forces (LWP, KBW, GZI WP) and continued by a mob of local townsfolk. Following a false tale of child kidnapping, including allegations of blood libel which led to a police investigation, violence broke out which resulted in the killing of around 40 Jews. Polish Communist courts later tried and condemned nine people to death in connection with the incident
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jewish Physicians
A massacre of Jewish professionals took place in the Czestochowa cemetery on March 20, 1943.
http://www.zchor.org/CZESTOCH.HTM

http://smoothstone.wordpress.com/category/holocaust/

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Arie Adelist
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/landshaf.txt

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

  Maps

http://www.zchor.org/CZESTMA1.JPG

Research
Alphabetical Listing of 127 Jews, all professionals, shot in Czestochowa" (List actually has 446 persons)
http://www.crarg.org/samples.pdf

http://www.zchor.org/CZESLIST.HTM

CRARG - Czestochowa-Radomsko Area Research Group
The CRARG's database of records is well over 600.000.  These records include 1790s census pages from towns in CRARG's core area of Poland; tombstone, synagogue, birth, marriage and death records for the 1800s; emigration, immigration, craftsman and Holocaust records for the 1900s.  This group has taken photographs of every tombstone in the Jewish cemeteries of many of the core towns, has translated all of the information on every tombstone and has made that information searchable by both given name and surname.

http://www.crarg.org/search-holocaust-records.php

Surviving Jews in Czestochowa
About 1945, 2503 persons
http://www.crarg.org/

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa2/Czestochowa2.html


Czyzewo (Czyzew)

JRI-Poland Database website 
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl

Yizkor Book
"History of the Jews in the Bukowina,"
("Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina,") 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html

 

http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.ihtml


Dabrowa (Dabrowa-Tarnowkska)


Synagogue in Dabrowa-Tarnowkska

Cemetery
Jewish cemetery in Dabrowa Tarnowska - commonly called by the inhabitants "kircholem" - is located at the intersection of ul. Warsaw and st. Joselewicz. According to various sources, the cemetery was established at the turn of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It follows from the cadastral maps, about half of the nineteenth century, the cemetery has been expanded.

During World War II the cemetery was vandalized by the Nazis. Gravestones were used to cure the yard at the then headquarters of the Wehrmacht, paving a street in Dabrowa Tarnowska or roads in Olesno. Gravestones were used also to build a swimming pool used by the Germans at the River Breń. The cemetery was the site of many executions of Jews. In one of them, on 22 July 1942 under the oak trees growing today, about one hundred eighty people were shot.

After the war, the cemetery had a few burials. Among other things, in 1959, occurred the funeral of Esther Adler, in 1962, lawyer Jacob Weissberg, a year later - Pesli Grincwajg, and in 1969 - Fryderyk Weissberg, Jacob's wife.


To this day, on the surface of more than two hectares, dozens of tombstones have survived, the oldest of which date from the mid nineteenth century. After the liberation, some of the tombstones were moved here, from where they were found in various parts of the city. There are also graves of Jews murdered during the war. Commemorate Holocaust victims or monuments, sponsored by the Congregation Tarnowska Jewish Faith and the Jews coming from Dabrowa and their descendants. Thanks to the efforts of Rabbi Mendel Reichberga rebuilt in 1991 Ohel, in which lie: the first Dabrowski Zaddik David, died in 1843, his son, Joseph, died. in 1876, and Moses Eliakim, who died in 1917. In 1992 at the initiative of Jews living in America, built a new fence. The cemetery is now fenced. The keys to the gate can be obtained in Dabrowski Culture Street.
Kosciusko 11 (Tel. 512 178 822)
http://www.jewish-guide.pl/shtetl/14

http://www.kirkuty.xip.pl/dabrowatarnang.htm

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/dabrowa-tarnowska.html

http://www.jewish-guide.pl/shtetl/14

http://www.dabrowa.okay.pl/index.html?prawa=ang_slowo

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C4%85browa_Tarnowska

http://www.glossary.com/browser.php?q=d%C4%83nil%C4%83

Holocaust
http://www.dialog.org/com/burmistrz-dabrowy.html

Shtetl, Virtual Museum of the History of Polish Jews
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/town/dabrowa_tarnows.htm

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/dabrowa-tarnowska/14,judaica-in-museums/2072,
museum-jewish-memory-chamber/

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol3_00107.html


Dabrowa Gornicza (Dombrau (in German), or Dabrow/Dabrowie (in Polish)

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  and seemingly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Jews settled here in the mid-19th century and engaged in small trade and metal crafts. It was Russian from 1815 until WW I. 
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0005_0_04802.html

Cemetery
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/58168130

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/dabrowa-gornicza.html

Holocaust
http://polishjews.org/shoahtts/041.htm

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Kehilath Yehudei Dabrowa Gornicza ve-hurbana
(Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza & its destruction) Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland, vol. 7
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00131.html  

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/Dabrowa.html


Daleszyce

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.


Danzig  (Gdansk)

  

The Capital of East Prussia.  After WWII Danzig was returned to Poland and re-named GDANSK. The Hanseatic League, a guild of northern Polish cities, originally formed to protect salt and spice trade routes, thrived from the 13th through the 17th centuries.  The association grew in power and eventually controlled all major trade in fish, grain, amber, fur, ore and textiles.  Gdansk was perfectly situated to take advantage of shipping from the south, traveling down the Vistula River to the Baltic.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Danzig.html

Danzig/Gdansk SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig/

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=55&letter=D

http://www.springerlink.com/content/xr2pp71783085528/


Debnike

A suburb of Krakow, Dębniki is Kraków's Administrative District No. VIII, split in 1990 from Podgórze. It contains the former villages of Bodzów, Dębniki, Kapelanka, Kobierzyn, Koło Tynieckie, Kostrze, Ludwinów, Podgórki Tynieckie, Pychowice, Sidzina, Skotniki, Tyniec and Zakrzówek, the neighborhoods of Kliny Zacisze and Mochnaniec, as well as a number of newly built estates. Dębniki is a primarily residential area, with diverse architecture, ranging from 19th-century tenements in the area of Rynek Dębniki (Dębniki Market) to plattenbau blocks of flats in the Podwawelskie and Ruczaj estates and suburban areas of detached houses in the outskirts. In Tyniec is a famous Benedictine abbey, founded in the 11th century.The district contains many open spaces, Zakrzówek Nature Park being the most popular of them. A new complex of university buildings, called the Third Campus of the Jagiellonian University, is being developed within the district.

A copy of the New York Tribune of May 1866 
http://fultonhistory.com/Newspapers%206/New%20York%20NY%20Tribune/New%20York
%20NY%20Tribune%201866%20May%20-%20Aug%20Grayscale/New%20York%20NY%
20Tribune%201866%20May%20-%20Aug%20Grayscale%20-%200140.pdf

Districts of Krakow
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Districts_of_Krak%C3%B3w

Map
http://www.openstreetmap.org/browse/way/24384574


Delejow

Pronounced as Deleyuv and is currently known as Deliyevo
http://www.avotaynu.com/books/cahjp.htm

Holocaust
http://www.holocaustforgotten.com/search_51-127.htm

http://www.feefhs.org/links/Poland/kmsc/kmsc-df.html


Dembowitz (Debica, Dembitz)

Six miles from Jaslo

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Dembitz"
(The Book of Dembitz)  
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Der. Jitkovichi

Had a Jewish population of 600 in 1919

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/04.html


Dhzikev (Tamobzheg)

Now known as Tamobzheg. Galician towns (83 of the towns are currently in Ukraine and 3 Poland) No known sites

http://www.kirkuty.xip.pl/indexang.htm


Dobromil


  Maps

http://www.maplandia.com/ukraine/lvivska/dobromil/

Research
Birth, Marriage and Death Records held in Warsaw Archives in Urzad Stanu from 1886-1925 ... zespol/
sygnatura #937 (Births)

L'viv has Army Records 1785-1788, 1819-1820, 1811-1887;  

Warsaw USC has Marriages from 1915-1940

Przemysl has Notary Records for many years from 1870 to 1939 with some gaps.

It appears that the Polish State Archives only has Jewish birth records for the years 1886-1940. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dobromil

http://www.genealogytoday.com/surname/finder.mv?Surname=Dobromil


Dobrzyca

Formerly called Kordeshagen, Pommem (Pomerania), Germany; now  Dobrzyca (Koszalin), Poland.  It is located on the coast in northern Poland, near  Koszalin.  Part of the former province Pommern, Prussia (Germany) pre-WWI, it is now in the re-designated province of Zachodniopomorskie. Prussia, or Preussen, was a very large German Kingdom which included parts of both western and eastern Europe in its heyday.  

Dobrzyca - another town by the same name is located southeast of Jarocin and northeast of Krotoszyn, due west of Pleszew.  It was formerly known as Dobberschutz, Posen, German, but now Dobrzyca (Pleszew) Poznan, Poland.  It was part of the former province of Posen, Prussia (Germany) during pre-WWI.  Today, it is in the province of Wielkopolska. 

These unique shtetls are located at:
Dobrzyca:
248.9 miles NW of Warsaw

Dobrzyca:
188.5 miles WNW of Warsaw

Research
The LDS Family History Library holds microfilms of the Jewish and Civil Records (in varying numbers for each separate place) for all three Dobrzyca.  Just run a place search for Dobrzyca in their on-line catalog at  

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhic.asp


Dobrzyn (currently called Golub Dobrzyn)

Located on the Drweca. There is  a survivor who has a web site. The site contains his story, documents and photos
http://internex.net.au/~fdobia/
  


    Maps

http://www.maplandia.com/poland/kujawsko-pomorskie/golub-dobrzyn/


Dolzanka

Located in the Tarnopol District
http://www.burger.si/Slapovi/Trzic/DovzankaENG.htm

History
http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/russia_brusilov2.htm


Dorbenai

Talmud study group in Dorbenai, Poland
Talmud study group in 1928 in Dorbenai
Photo from Yad Vashem Archive

 


Drecin

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Bulkstein 
http://www.genealogy.org.il/links.htm

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

http://www.romansk.ku.dk/bib/rumaen/crs.htm


Drobnin (Drobin)

Located northwest of Warsaw in the Plock district
http://sethbook.tripod.com/mytree/history.html

http://www.panix.com/~sethbook/originalwebindex.html

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-500009

Drobin, Wyszograd, Radzilow, Karelitz and Nowogrodek - Information about these towns are available at Seth J. Bookey's Family History website which includes Maps, Photo album, research advice and more


Drogobych #1 and #2

Once in Poland and now in Ukraine. The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records and the estimated cost of Indexing and the current status
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Drogobych #1
Birth Records
1877-1899
Marriage Records
1871-1881, 1884-1891, 1893-1897, 1899
Death Records
NoneDrogobych #2
Birth Records
None
Marriage Records
None
Death Records
1852-1896, 1898-1899

ShtetLinks Page for #1 & #2
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/drogobych/drogobych.html

Synagogue 
http://members.tripod.com/~mikerosenzweig/polsynagog.htm

http://members.core.com/~mikerose/polsynagog.htm

Yizkor Book  for #1 & #2
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html


Drohiczyn nad Bugiem

Located  88 Km south southwest of Bialystok.

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html


Drzewica

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig
 


Dubno      Ukraine Shtetls


The Dubno Jewish Hospital before WW II
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/image/21213/

Dubno is a city located on the Ikva River in the Rivne Oblast province of western Ukraine. The current estimated population is around 37,690. According to the census of 1897 it had a population of 13,785, including 5,608 Jews. In 1650 there were 47 Jewish and 141 Christian households. In 1931 the Jewish population rose to 7,364. On the eve of the Nazi invasion, about 12,000 Jews lived in Dubno, including more than 4,000 refugees from Poland. The Nazi occupation of the town lasted from June 25, 1941 until February 9, 1944. More than 1,000 Jews were shot in July and August of 1941. In April 1942, about 8,000 Jews were driven into the ghetto and murdered in a series of aktions between May and October 1942.

The Dubno Ghetto existed for less than seven months, from April 2 to Oct. 23, 1942. More than half of its residents were slaughtered in May of 1942, even while some of the residents were still settling into the ghetto. There was never any organized resistance or escape from the ghetto, but those inside were trying to find ways to escape. Some did so with the help of their non-Jewish friends and then in hiding. Others did so with false papers. And others survived bitter cold and hunger in fields by themselves, in groups, or with the partisans. On February 9, 1944, the Red Army liberated the Dubno Ghetto. Around 300 Jews survived the Dubno Ghetto. By 2000, around 10 Jews remained in Dubno, Ukraine
http://chelm.freeyellow.com/dubnomemorial.html

Research
A List of Dubno Family History Researchers
http://chelm.freeyellow.com/dubno_surnames.html

Yizkor Book
http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1562


Dukla


Entrance to "new" Jewish cemetery, Dukla, 2011. © Ruth Ellen Gruber

Robert Szczepaniak, of the Shtetl Dukla Society for the Protection of the Heritage of Jews of Dukla Region, reports that the two Jewish cemeteries in Dukla are in a “deplorable state.” Both were devastated by the Germans in WW2.  The old cemetery, dating back to the 18th century, is totally overgrown. The new cemetery, established in around 1870 across a dirt road from the old cemetery, seem fairly well maintained, with grass and weeds cut, but has been subject to theft and vandalism
http://www.jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2013/05/31/appeal-to-help-restore-jewish-cemeteries-
in-dukla-poland/%E2%80%9D

http://fodz.pl/?d=1&l=pl

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol3_00111.html


Dynow

Located 24.2 miles North Northeast of Bukowsko and 176.3 miles South Southeast of Warsaw.   

Debbie Raff seraph@dc.rr.com has developed a web site "Dynow - A Shtetl in Poland" for this town
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Dynow
 

Yizkor Book


Dzialoszin (Dzialoszyn)

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00088.html


Dzialoszyce


Ruins of the synagogue from 1852
http://www.jewish-guide.pl/shtetl/14

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya 

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Moshe Roznek 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including:
Chmielnik, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy  Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages. 

Yizkor Book
Owned by Dr. Susan Javinsky SusanLittleDVM@compuserve.com 
Sefer Yizkor Shel Kehillot Dzialoszyce ve-ha-seviva (Yizkor book of the Jewish community in Dzialoszyce and surroundings)  
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Dzikow

History
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/tarnobrzeg/5,history/

Yizkor Book
"Memories of My Shtetl" "Kehilat Tarnobrzeg-Dzikow"
The Community of Tarnobrzeg-Dzikow which is located in Western Galicia. Bet David (House of David) Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Vol. III
http://www.encyclo.co.uk/define/Dzik%C3%B3w

http://resources.ushmm.org/Holocaust-Names/List-Catalog/display/details.php?type=nlcat&id=140520&ord=23 


Falenica

Located 18 miles from Warsaw


Filipow

Located about 23 miles due west of Punsk on the German/Polish border


Frampol

Located at Latitude 50/41 and Longitude 22/40, less than 26 miles west of Zamosc. Some of the pre-war Jewish communities located within 20 miles of Frampol were: 
Goraj, Bilgoraj, Janow Lubelski, Szczebrzeszyn and Zwierzyniec.

Indices to Jewish vital records of the town of Frampol from 1871-1900 have been indexed by the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland team in Warsaw. Frampol had 1,465 Jewish residents in 1921, out of a total population of about 2,720. Ari Morris is the Town leader

Research
The database contains thousands of records, so this is a great opportunity to expand on whatever information you might already have discovered. The available indices include those which have already been microfilmed by the Mormons / LDS, as well as those from the Polish State Archives (PSA)which have not been microfilmed by LDS. As all the LDS records for Frampol are already completely indexed, as soon as the PSA indices are completed ), all available records for Frampol will be ready to be included in JRI-Poland's database, pending funding of the project. Here's a summary of the available indices to Frampol records, according to their status:

LDS (3 indexes have already been microfilmed): 1871-1890. Polish State Archives (not microfilmed)1891-1900 Birth, Marriage and Deaths

Kirsten Gradel kmgradel@dadlnet.dk has offered to help those with a known or registered (in JGFF) family interest in Frampol by looking for "their" names of interest in the database. 

For 1880-90 it also contains names of parents, for 1880-84 ages of deceased, for D 1890 even maiden name of mothers.

Here's a summary of the available indices according to the type of record:
Births: 
1871-1900.
Marriages: 
1871-1897, 1899-1900.
Deaths: 
1871-1900


Fraustadt   (Polish Wschowa)

 

A town in the Lubusz Voivodeship in Poland with 14,607 inhabitants in 2004.  It is the capital of Wschowa County.

Jewish Community
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/city/wschowa/

Synagogue
The first synagogue was built around the year 1772 on a plot of land belonging to a tailor by the name of Kliem.


Frysztak

A small shtetl located near Strzyzow, Jaslo and Krosno, in southern Poland.  Photos, History and a link to the 1891 Galician Business Directory, among other links are available at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/frysztak/frysztak.htm


Gasawa

Cemetery
Jewish
cemetery in Gasawa was located by the road to Strzegowo. There is no trace left.


Gdansk  

World War II began here in this city.  After WW II, Gdansk is probably the most successful reconstruction in the country of Poland, what with its high-gabled houses, its golden fountains and it face toward the sea.
http://www.pharao.com/cam/Europe/Poland/?Blaszki/transportation.html


Gebice

Cemetery
The Jewish cemetery in Gebice was located by the road to Zbytow. The area now is a private property. There is no trace left


Ger

Ira Block posted on 1/30/07 "I recently emailed requested photos from the following shuls/cemeteries. If anyone wants copies of anything below just send a request via email to irablock@gmail.com


Gielniow

A town in  Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Glebowice

Close to Wadowice south of Krakow - within the Galician district of Austro-Hungary until 1918


Glinice

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Glinyany (Gliniany)

Formerly in Poland and now in Ukraine. 

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html 

Birth Records
1860-1893
Marriage Records

None
Death Records
1877-1898

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Glinyany1/Glinyany.html


Gliwice  and Gliwice County

A list of Jews deported from Gleiwitz, Germany (now Gliwice, Poland) in 1942-1943 i
http://www.jewishmemory.gliwice.pl/eng_2_1.html

This is a compilation and collation from several sources, with further identifying information about the individuals added by the compiler, my father Ernst Lustig (1921-1999).  Please address any corrections, additions, suggestions, and queries to me Roger Lustig trovato@att.net  

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.

List of Jews
Deported from Gleiwitz, Germany (now Gliwice, Poland) in 1942-1943
http://www.jewishmemory.gliwice.pl/eng_2_1.html


 Giogowek   (Oberglogau)

Once located in Prussia, but now is known as Giogowek, Poland.


Glowaczow

A town in the Kozienice district of (before WW 1) Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  Jewish vital records for the years 1883 - 1897 are located at the Polish State Archives in Radom.  

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Yosef Rivo 
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
Jewish vital records for 1898 - 1940
Available at the Urzad Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Records Office) in Glowaczow. 

In the early 20th century Duma voter lists for the Kozienice district is mentioned in the Kielce-Radom SIG Journal, Vo. I, No. 1, page 19. 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig
  


Glowno

Yizkor Book
For information contact Joe Ross
joeross1220@comcast.net


Gniewoszow  (Gniewkowo)

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 

Cemetery
The Jewish cemetery in Gniewkowo was located on Parkowa St. The place is now a tennis court.
Gniewkowo, ul. Parkowa, kujawsko-pomorskie Westerplatte Street


Gologo(u)ry (Gologury, Gologory) (goloh gooryh)

Located about 20 km east of L'viv and it means 'naked hills'.  It is currently located in Zloczow district (Oblast) of Tarnopol (Ternopil) 

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Birth Records
1876-1881, 1883-1894, 1897-1900
Marriage Records

None
Death Records
1877-1878, 1880-1881, 1883-1894

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol2_00137.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html


Gombin (Polish: Gabin)

Located 60 miles west of Warsaw and 15 miles south of Plock.   It is close to Kutno, Lask, Gostynin and Zychlin. Nearby towns are: Gostynin, Osmolin, Gombin, Zychlin, Sanniki, Jaksice and Poddebice.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/gombin/gombin.html 

History
Gombin
Jewish Historical and Genealogical Society
Web site indicates a mass grave of Jews from the nearby Czerkow Concentration Camp and names of those buried in the Catholic cemetery. 

http://www.zchor.org/SHOMER10.HTM

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Rivka Aloni 
http://www.genealogy.org.il/links.htm

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
Duma Czarist Voters List for
Gombin (Gabin)
"Gombin: dos Lebn un umkum fun a Yiddish shtetl in Polyn Gombin":  
The Life and Destruction of a Jewish Town in Poland
 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

An interesting Gombin site to visit is Ada Holtzman's which offers much in the way of Polish Heritage, including this shtetl at 
http://www.zchor.org/indexgom.htm
 

"I have researched Catholic Church records for various shteleh and have discovered a few ancestors.  It is very difficult research, however, unless you are able to read old Russian handwriting.  In most instances in my case, they were not signed in Hebrew.  This added to the difficulties. " From a posting by Betty Provizer Starkman

Names

http://www.zchor.org/SHOMERIM.HTM

Rajzel Zychlinsky, great Yiddish poet, was born in Gombin
http://www.zchor.org/zychlinsky/zychlinsky.htm

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel created by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum. 
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Goniadz (pronounced Goh nyonh dz)

The town is about 50 miles NW from Bialystok and a few miles NW from Monki.  It is situated on the right bank of Biebrza River, main town of the Biebrzanski National Park (bird's Sanctuary, Red Wetlands).  Some of the first battles of the WW I between the Imperial Armies of the Tsar and Kaiser were fought right there - in the Mazurian swamps.  From a posting by Alexander Sharon

History
Members of the local Citizens' Guard arrested 40 "Communists" - all of them Jews.  After three days of tortures, they murdered all the captives in a local Jewish graveyard and, after that, they plundered their property.  The perpetrators intended to burn alive the Jews in a Jewish school at the town's center, but they resigned after some protests of the neighbors, who were afraid of fire.  Further information can be found at
http://www.radzilow.com/tygodnik.htm

Yizkor book
Published for Goniadz
"Sefer Yizkor Goniadz" (Our hometown Goniadz
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html 

http://www.nypl.org/research/chss/jws/yizkorbookonline.cfm


Gora Kalwaria

The shtetl was located in Piaseczno county, Mazowieckie Volvodeship
http://flagspot.net/flags/pl-ma-gk.html

Holocaust
During the WW II, almost all of the Jews perished in Nazi Concentration camps. 

http://www.fotw.us/flags/pl-ma-gk.html

http://www.flickr.com/photos/apolka/3242900736/


Gorlice (County of)


Books

"Zydzi Gorliccy" (The Jews of Gorlice)
Authored by Wladislaw Boczon and published in 1998


Holocaust
Holocaust survivor Harry Balsam story
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Gorlice/balsam.html

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Paulina Bergman
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


   Maps

Hand-drawn map of Gorlice and various features there during World War II.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Gorlice/gorlice_wartime_map.html

Four historic postcards
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Gorlice/historic_postcards.html

Research
This recently updated web site refers to Records of the Austrian regime from 1901 to 1918
http://infoukes.com/culture/  

Gorlice ShtetLinks site
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Gorlice/gorlice.htm


Yizkor Book
"Sefer Gorlice"; ha-Kehila be-vinyana u-ve-hurbana (Gorlice book; The Community at Rise and Fall)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Gorodenka (Horodenka)

Once in Poland and now in Ukraine.  Research Group - a group of genealogists have combined to employ and to transcribe records to be hopefully found in Polish Archives.  Information at
http://shangrila.cs.ucdavis.edu:1234/heckman/gorodenka/pol-research.html 
 

The site has a list of the types of records available, surname indexes for some of the records, estimated costs, etc. 

Landsmanshaftn
There is a Horodenker Association of Israel currently in existence.  The contact is Zvi Weicman, 29 Keren Hayesod St. Ra'anana, Israel 43305
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records and the estimated cost of Indexing and the current status at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Birth Records
1841-1896, 1898-1899
Marriage Records

1856-1876, 1878-1895
Death Records

1851-1881, 1887-1892

These records are one of the most complete set of vital records that are available for those researching their ancestry in eastern Galicia.  In addition, other nearby smaller towns and villages were required to register their vital events in Gorodenka.  So if your ancestral towns was very close to Gorodenka, you may find vital records amongst those that are indexed.
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodenka/gorodenka.html 

ShtetLinks Page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Gorodenka/

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gorodenka/gorodenka.html


Gorodok - (Horodok/Grodek, Grodek Jagellonski)

Located 35 km E of Bialystok

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Birth Records
1870-1876,1886-1892
Marriage Records

None
Death Records

1877-1890


ShtetLinks page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Gorodok/

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gorodok/gorodok.html


Gorodets (Horodetz)

Yizkor Book
Translated by Gene Sucov genellen@netvision.net.il


Gorzkiwice (Gorzkowice)F

Czestochowa and Lodz have Yizkor books.  Gorzkowice does not.  You can get details on these books by searching the Yizkor database, which is accessible from the Yizkor Book SIG's web page
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/

or send a blank Email: message to:
yiz...@jewishgen.org


Gorzno

Jewish cemetery located on Cmentarna St. was established in the beginning of 19th century. At the same time first Jewish settlers arrived to the town. In second half of 19th century a synagogue was built. In 1880 a considerable emigration of Jews was registered. Today there are no fragments of Matzevot left. The area was built over. The cemetery before World War II was 0.83 ha
http://fodz.pl/?d=10&id=381&l=en


Gostynin Wloclawek

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Zeev Belfer
http://dev.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/archive/May-2010.html

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Gowarczow

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Goworowo

Jews settled in Goworowo in the 18th century. Located 13 miles south of Ostrołęka and 29 miles south west of Lomza.  The 1900 Jewish population was 1,844.  It is a village in Ostrołęka County of Masovian Voivodeship in east-central Poland and is the seat of the administrative district called Gmina Goworowo.  It is approximately 19 km (12 mi) south of Ostrołęka and 85 km (53 mi) north east of Warsaw. The population is now about 820. Goworowo was an entirely Jewish shtetl on the Orz river with close to 500 families. 1921 Jewish population: 1085. The town is on the Warsaw-Łomża Railroad between the Ostrow-Mazowiecki and Ostrołęka, for many years Goworowo was part of Bialystok Guberniya.

Cemetery
The cemetery is located about 60 m from Grodzisko-Pasiek road junction. It was established in 19th century and the last burial took place in 1940.  The 1.7 ha cemetery, destroyed during World War II, has 20 Matzevot visible in the cemetery. About 200 held by Goworowo Town Council. [May 2009]
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/goworowo.html

Yizkor Book
Yizkor: Goworowo; Sefer Zikaron. (Tel Aviv, 1966)
http://resources.ushmm.org/Holocaust-Names/List-Catalog/display/details.php?type=nlcat&id=141580&ord=18


Grabowiec

A town in  Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Grady

Located near Plock.  Also a second Grady is near Ostrow Mazowiecki, while another is near Suwalki and another near Lublin.  Grady is pronounced "Grundy" or "Grondy"


Grajewo

Yizkor Book
Contact Ernie Fine Erfine@aol.com for further information


Granica

A town in  Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Grimaylov (Grzmalow

Located in Ternopol Oblast about 7 miles south southeast from Skalat.  In the 19th century, it was part of Skalat District.  Records are currently being indexed by AGAD


Grodno

Located at the most north eastern corner of Poland on the Niemen River bordering Lithuania.  136 km to the North is the Baltic sea and the Polish port city of Gdansk.  Before WW II, it was a city of 65,000 inhabitants of which 25,000 were Jews.

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Yosef Struvolski  
http://www.ejewish.info/resources/resourceSearchResults.aspx?sText=Grodno%20(province,%20Belarus)&keywordid=361&rsid=0

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Books

"The Last Sunrise"
Authored by Harold Gordon (Hirshel Grodzienski) and published by H & J Publishing in 1992.  A true story about a ten year old boy who survived the Holocaust, five years in Nazi Concentration Camps and with a positive attitude toward the future. 
ISBN: 0963258915


Research
Massive records kept by the German Grodno Amtskommisar for Civil Administration of the Bialystok Region are in the archives of the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C.  There is a list of the 1901 Minsk Guberniya administrative divisions 
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/Vitaly/Minsk%20Uyezd.htm  

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel built by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum. 
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm

Grodno Gubernia originated surnames
http://www.jewishgenealogy.com.ar/grodno/ancestors_a.html


Grudziadz

The first Jews arrived to Grudziadz in 19th century. In the beginning of 1939 the Jewish community reached 182 inhabitants. In 1844 a synagogue was built in town.

Cemeteries
The old Jewish cemetery located on Cmentarna St. was established in 1880. It was destroyed during World War II. There are no fragments of Matzevot left. Today there is a town garden. The cemetery is 1.57 ha.

A new Jewish cemetery is located on Paderewskiego St. It was established in 1830. During World War II the cemetery was devastated. There are no Matzevot left. The cemetery is 0.13 ha.


Gusyatin (Husiatyn)

Once in Poland and now in Ukraine.

Research The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records and the estimated cost of Indexing and the current status
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 

Birth Records
1815-1816, 1818-1876
Marriage Records

1826, 1851-1852, 1856-1858, 1865-1876
Death Records

None

ShtetLinks Page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Gusyatin/gusyatin.html


Gvozdets (Gwozdziec Miasto)

Gwozdziec, a village between Spie and Kamien in southeastern Poland (137 miles SSE of Warsaw). The town of Gwozdziec is now in the present Ukraine.  Site includes a map.
http://www.jdlasica.com/PI01/gwozdziec.html

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html

http://www.jdlasica.com/PI01/gwozdziec.html

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 

Birth Records
1858, 1863, 1870
Marriage Records

None
Death Records

None

Synagogue
The Gwozdziec Synagogue was a remarkable wooden synagogue built in the Polish Lithuanian Empire in 1731.
http://www.facebook.com/gwozdziec

http://vimeo.com/37061192

http://www.handshouse.org/gwozdziec.html 


Gwozdiec - (Gwozdziec Miasto/Gvozdets)

Research
All the records available at AGAD are on-line.  This only includes births for the following years:
Births
1858, 1863, 1870

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel built by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum. 
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm


Holendry

A small village named Holdenry used to be located near the larger parish village Dubryniow in the district Rohatyn in Stanislawow ProvinceCurrently this village is known as Dobrynev.  There were 71 pre-war Jewish residents from a total of 1,858 villagers in the 1921 census.

The Holendry in the Lublin region (147.6 miles ESE of Warsaw) had 21 Jews.

There are several villages with the same name: 

33.1 miles SSE of Warsaw;
47.2 miles SSE of Warsaw
50.6 miles SSE of Warsaw
96.9 miles SW of Warsaw
147.6 miles ESE of Warsaw
107.2 miles S of Warsaw
114.7 miles S of Warsaw.  

Research


Horodenka (see Gorodenka)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Zvi Weicman 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodenka/gor086.html

Research
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html
 


Horodets (Gorodets

Yizkor Book
Translated by Gene Sucov genellen@netvision.net.il


Horodlo

Yizkor Book
There are 256 entries

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Yizkor 

The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs -- published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the Yizkor Book Project site at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html 

This database is only an index of names; it directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more complete information may be available. This database currently contains over 186,000 entries from the necrologies of 210 different Yizkor Books.


Hrubieszow

Cemetery
http://www.cemes.org/current/LGI/204-eng.htm

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Mordechai Horowitz 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodenka/gor086.html

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
The
Hrubieszow Genealogy Group's web site can be found at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/hrubieszow/  

The site includes an Email: discussion list, a researcher's page, a surnames page, plus links of interest concerning Hrubieszow genealogy.  Contact: Aaron J. Biterman  JewishCol@aol.com

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00147.html


Ilza (Drildz)

Gebäude des Aufsehers der Synagoge (Piastowska-Straße)
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/gallery/

A town in  Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  

http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/the-old-shtetl-ilza-drildz/2006/02/22/?print

http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=cm&g=show&idg=1709

Cemetery
Ilza Historical Cemetery Restoration Project
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/ilza.html

History
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/ilza/5,history/

Holocaust
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/ilza/16,accounts-memories/19925,skarzysko-kamienna-
slave-labor-camp-ilza-poland-by-annette-renschowicz/

Research
Complete extracts of all Jewish births recorded in this town's records
http://www.jewishgen.org/KRSIG/YearSeven.html

Synagogue
http://www.isjm.org/jhr/no2/ilza.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Pinkas_poland/pol7_00075.html


Inowlodz

Located near Tomaszow Mazowiecki Poland
http://www.zchor.org/inowlodz/inowlodz.htm


Inowroclaw

Cemetery
http://fodz.pl/?d=10&id=734&l=en

Research
The
Inowroclaw Branch of the Polish State Archive 
88-100 Inowroclaw, ul. Narutowicza 58,
Kierownik dr Lidia Wakuluk 
Phone (0-536) 57 64 44


Ivangorod  (Deblin, Demblin, Irena)

This town has been incorporated into a town that is known nowadays as Deblin in Poland (Yiddish: Demblin - Irena) at 5134 2150, some 60 miles SE from Warsaw in the inflow of River Wieprz into Vistula (Wisla) River. Ivangorod and its sister fortresses Slavy and Balony were the Russian Poland era (1795-1918) military fortification.
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/deblin/Deblin.html#TOC


Ivano-Frankovo  (Frankivsk - Stranislawow)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Formerly in Poland and now in Ukraine

Research
Birth Records
1877-1897
Marriage Records
None
Death Records
None


Ivano Frankovsk  (Stanislawow #1


http://www.bulver.se/xmk/ussr/ua-ivano-fr.html

Cemetery
There were two Jewish cemeteries in Stanislawow.  One of them, the newer cemetery dating from the 1920s or '30s,  still has hundreds of surviving tombstones, thanks to the efforts of Rabbi Kolesnik in Ivano Frankovsk, and also the organization listed below. The other, ancient, Jewish cemetery has been completely destroyed and is currently the site of a film cinema. There are no surviving tombstones in the latter
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/stanislawow/cemetary-1.htm

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/stanislawow/map_area_8.htm

Jewish Community
http://www.chabad.org/centers/default_cdo/aid/249594/jewish/Jewish-Community-of-Ivano-Frankovsk.htm

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/stanislawow/townmapsum.htm

http://fjc.ru/ivano-frankovsk

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html 


Birth Records

1864-1874, 1877-1881 - 1892 -1899
Marriage Records

None
Death Records

None

Ivano Frankovsk
(Stanislawow #2)
Birth Records
1864-1874, 1877-1899
Marriage Records
1872-1876, 1889-1897
Death Records
1863-1887, 1890-1896

ShtetLinks Page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/stanislawow/

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/stanislawow-arim/stanislawow-arim.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/stanislawow-lists/stanislawow.html


Iwaniska

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 

Research
There are marriage partners' names from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages.


Izbica Lubelski

http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/ghettos/izbica/izbica.html

Located 20-30 miles SE of Lublin.

Ghetto
The Izbica ghetto was a Jewish ghetto created by Nazi Germany in Izbica in occupied Poland during
World War II, serving as a transfer point for deportation of Jews from Poland, Germany, Austria and
Czechoslovakia to Belzec and Sobibor extermination camps. The ghetto was created in 1941, although the first transports of Jews from German Reich started arriving there already in 1940. Izbica was the largest transit ghetto in the Lublin district, with death rate almost equal to that of the Warsaw ghetto.
SS-
Hauptsturmführer Kurt Engels known for his exceptional cruelty, served as its only commandant
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izbica_Ghetto

Research
In transliterating Jewish vital records indexes, I came across an abnormal increase in the numbers of deaths in Izbica during the year 1848.

Generally, there were about 30 - 50 max deaths per year for Izbica [a town then of about 2,000 in size] during the 1840s - 1860s.  In 1848, however, there are 216 recorded deaths, across all age groups!!  Over 10% of the population!


Jablonow

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel created by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum.  
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm


Jagielnica

Research
Included in the JRI-PL database.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html


Jakszyc  (Jaksice)

There are at least three towns with this name:

1. About 35 km southwest of Torun, on the road from Inowroclaw to Bydgoszcz.
  
 This part of Poland was known as 'Wartheland' during WW II)

2. About 35 km due north of Crakow, about 7 km southwest of Miechow

3. About 35 km west northwest of Tarnow on the Wisla (Vistula) River.


Janow/Ivano Frankovo

Cemetery
Daniel Kazez has a few dozen photographs of the tombstones in the cemetery.

Research
JRI-Poland has added birth, marriage and death records (1869, 1871-97, 1883 -87)
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psaczestochowa.htm


  Maps

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1061265


Janow Podlaski

Yizkor Book
A Yizkor Book translation has been updated


Janow Sokolski

Near Radomsko and Czestochowa

Cemetery
Digital photographs of all of the tombstones in the Jewish cemetery.
Ada Green ada.Green@postoffice.worldnet.att.net  has cataloged the two cemetery plots for the Chaim Hersch Weiss First Janower Sick and Benevolent Association (Chaim Hersch Weiss Erste Yanover KUV)According to the "Guide to the YIVO Archives", this society was organized by immigrants from Janow, Poland in 1909 and a group from Stanislawow joined a year later.

Research
Included in the JRI-PL database.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel created by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum.  

http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm


Janowiec Wielkopolski

Cemetery
The
Jewish cemetery in Janowiec Wielkopolski is located by the road to Znin. It was established in the end of 19th century when Jews arrived to town. In 1875 the Jewish population reached 189 people. The cemetery was devastated during World War II. Today there are no fragments of Matzevot left. There is a commemorative statue in place. The cemetery is 0.28 ha
http://fodz.pl/?d=10&id=391&l=en


Jatowka

Located in the Grodno Guberniya, Volkovysk District, Bialystok Region formerly in Poland and now in Belarus.
http://www.avotaynu.com/jalowka/Jalowka.html


Jonava (Yanovo)

Located in the Kovno Uyezd.  In JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker, there are Yanovo's/Janowa's in Belarus, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Poland, Romania and Russia.  

There are also many towns named Janow in Poland, including a Janow Podlaski and a Janow Lubelskie.  There is even another Yonavo Jonava (Yanovo) - located in the Kovno Uyezd In JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker, there are Yanovo's/Janowa's in Belarus, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Poland, Romania and Russia. 

Cemetery
Ada Green offered a listing of Jonava Societies and Associations  associated with the JGSNY Cemetery Project in a posting to the JewishGen Digest group


Janowiec Wisla 

Kielce-Radom  Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Jarocin

Located in the former Posen Province

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/jarocin.html


Jaroslaw

The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book "The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 18th Century" Authored by M. J. Rosman amounted to 1,884.

Research
Jewish vital records in the Przemysl Branch  
196 Births
131 Marriages
38 Deaths

http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/ 
   

There are no Mormon microfilms of Jewish vital records for this town


Jaryczow Nowy  (Novyy Yarchev)

Research
All the records available at AGAD are on-line
Births

1888-1890, 1892, 1893, 1896, 1897
Marriages
1879, 1892, 1897
Deaths
1879-1881, 1883, 1889-1892, 1899


Jasionowka

Holocaust

http://www.neveragain.org/1943.htm

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Avraham Poplevski  
http://www.iajgs.org/cemetery/poland/jasionowka.html

Research
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/goniadz/gon677.html


Jasliska: Podkarpackie

Since the Middle Ages, Jaśliska had little Jewish settlement. Only in 1848 were Jews allowed freely to purchase homes in the city and participate in commercial activities. In the late 1930s, about 300 Jews lived there. During WW II, the Nazis shot some of them at the top of the slope Błudne near Barwinka. Others were transported to labor camps. Few survived
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/jasliska.html


Jaslo

Once in the Austrian sector before WW I. Records from 1853 to 1918

History of Jaslo
Postcards, Streets plan, Map of Galicia and more

http://www.mapofpoland.net/Jaslo,description.html

http://histsociety.blogspot.com/2009/07/history-battles-hitler-tree-in-poland.html

Research
This web site refers to Records of the Austrian regime from 1901 to 1918 
http://infoukes.com/culture/ 


Jastrzab

A town in  Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Jaworsko

Located in the Krakow region, Brzesko district.


Jaworow  (See also Goworowo)

Research
Included in the JRI-PL database.

http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html


 Jaworzno

A coal mining town


Jawornik (Javownik)

There are a few towns in the vicinity of Dylegovoka (Dyla,go'wka) about halfway between Rzeszow and Przemysl


Jedlinsko

A town in  Kielce-Radom  Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Jedrzejow

A town in  Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig  


Jedwabne  (pronounced Yed vab nay)

Holocaust
1,200 of the 1,600 Jews of this shtetl, located in economically depressed northeastern Poland,  were locked in a barn and burned to death on July 10, 1941, not by Nazis, but by their neighbors  -- fellow Poles.  


Books

Grim details laid out in
"Neighbors: The Destruction of the Jewish Community in Jedwabne, Poland
",
Aa book by Polish émigré Jan Tomasz Gross, a naturalized American of Polish and Jewish heritage who is a professor of politics and European studies at New York University, and published by Princeton University Press, helped blow the cover off decades of communist propaganda, and forced Poles into sober reassessment of their sell-image as victims -- and never collaborators -- in Nazi oppression.   

The book, "Neighbors," was based, in part, on witness accounts from Jewish survivors and non-Jewish townspeople.  There were 1,600 Jedwabne Jews who were murdered and were burned to death.   The Germans had entered the town on June 23, 1941.


Holocaust
Sixty years after the Jews in this village were slaughtered by their neighbors, Polish President Aleksander Kwasniewski offered an apology and asked forgiveness.  A new wood and concrete monument to the victims was unveiled.  

The wording reads in Polish, Hebrew and Yiddish: "In memory of the Jews of Jedwabne and surrounding areas, men, women and children, fellow dwellers of this land, murdered and burned alive at this site on 10 July 1941. Jedwabne, July 10, 2001."

Research
This is a good site to visit for more information:
http://radzilow.com/tygodnik.htm

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Jedwabne: Historiya ve-zikaron Yedwabne": History and Memorial Book: and Jedwabne"
This site is in Polish by default with very few English articles are at 
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jedwabne/yedwabne.html

http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1468


Jezow

For information contact Joe Ross joeross1220@comcast.net


Jozefow nad Wisla

Located about 90 miles south  southeast of Warsaw and 10 miles SW of Opole Lubelskie,  South of Kazimierz Dolny (south of Pulawy) and about 30 miles west-south-west of Lublin.

Research
A web page for this town may be available.  For further information on the web page contact Helen Banks neshaver@gn.apc.org


Jozefow Ordynacki

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.


Jurborg

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel built by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum.  
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm


Kalisz  (Kalusz) (Starostwo)

Located about 150 miles from Warsaw.

The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book
"The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the
18th Century
"
Authored by M. J. Rosman amounted to 1,662.

Ghetto
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0011_0_10638.html

http://www.thehistoryconnection.com/Ghetto.html

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Baruch Kolsky 
http://www.scribd.com/doc/48329547/Polish-Clergy-Rescue-Saving-Jews-During-World-War-two

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
Birth
, Marriage and Death indexes
Now searchable on the JRI database

Marriage, Death
1823, 1846, 52
Birth, Marriage, Death
1824-1828
Marriage Death
1867
Birth
1868, 1846,48, 51, 52
Birth, Marriage, Death
1875-1878
Death
1886, 1852
Marriage, Death
1887

This means that the years from 1821-1867 are complete as are the years 1875-1878 and 1887 according to a posting by Sue Fifer suef@dial.pipex.com  Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
http://www.suef.dial.pipex.com/main5.html

Yizkor Book
There is a translation of "Sefer Kalish" at  
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html 

Kalisz Gubernia originated surnames
http://www.jewishgenealogy.com.ar/kalisz/ancestors_a.html


Kamienica

Located 16.8 miles west southwest of Nowy Sacz.


Kamenka Bugskaya (Kamionka Strumilowa)

The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html

Research
Birth Records

1859-1876, 1880-1884, 1890-1899
Marriage Records

1866-1876, 1878-1898
Death Records

1789-1898


Kamien Krajenskie

The Jewish cemetery in Kamien Krajenski was established in 19th century. It was located nearby the road to Chojnice. After the war the area was built over. Now there is agricultural cooperative society
http://fodz.pl/?d=10&id=57&l=en


Kamiensk

It was noted that there was only one survivor from this shtetl. The shtetl was located near Piotrkow-Trybunalski 


Kamionka Strumilowa (Kamenka Bugskaya, Komionka )

Located some 20 miles NNE from L'viv, Ukraine in Tranopol region, Lida Uyezd, Vilna-Grodno Guberniya

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel built by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum.   
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/shtetls/skomionkalv.htm  

Yizkor Book


Kanczuga

"Nestled in the foothills of the Carpathian Mountains of Galicia in southeastern Poland lies the small town of Kanczuga. Most travel guides neglect to mention this community in their regional descriptors, and it rarely appears on any maps. Yet, its place in the history of the Holocaust and its connection to a past I (Sam Intrator) never knew created a large and alluring reference point for me during a recent visit to Poland."
http://www.zchor.org/KANCZUGA.HTM


Kaplan

8 miles from the town of Ciechanowiec  


Karczew

A town a few kilometers southwest of Warsaw 
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/12559641

http://www.warsawvoice.pl/view/6089/

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.


Kartuz - Bereza

Now in Belarus

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Chaim Ben-Israel  
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Yizkor Book
http://isurvived.org/2Postings/bookOnline_Kartuz-Bereza.html


Kartuzy

Synagogue
A small town about 20 miles (30km) west of Gdansk had a wooden synagogue which was destroyed by the Nazis 


Kasna Dolna

49N 20E
http://www.polishjews.org/places/003.htm


Katowice

A name for a town and a district. 

Cemetery
Ada Holtzman at ada01@netvision.net The address of the chairman of the Jewish Council in Katowice, Poland.  Contact Ada for details about recent burials in the Jewish Katowice cemetery.
http://www.pharao.com/cam/Europe/Poland/?Blaszki/transportation.html  

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Zila Katriel   
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Katyn Forest

Holocaust
This infamous site, which includes Katyn, Miednoje and Staro Bielsk was the site of a massacre originally thought to be by the Nazis, but as it was later proved out by documents provided to Gorbachev of the Soviet Union, was perpetrated by the KGB to rid them of Polish POWs that were captured by the Soviets before, June, 21, 1941 - the date that the Germans invaded Russia.  These citizen/soldiers, which included Jews, were executed between March to April, 1940.  
http://karta.icm.edu.pl/indeks/ind-baz.html 


Kazanow

A town in  Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Kazimierz (Kazimierz Dolny, Kuzmir)

This district was founded as a separate town in 1335 by Casimir the Great and by 1495, Jews driven out of Krakow settled here. There are two synagogues and several restaurants serving Jewish style food.  There are
about 1,000 Jews remaining today in the city.

The Jewish Quarter in Krakow
http://id3470.securedata.net/krakow-info/JewishQ.htm

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Cracow.html

Museum
There is an 18th century museum containing precious Judaica made of gold and silver.

Research
6,046 indices to non-microfilmed Jewish vital records of Kazimierz Dolny (Kuzmir) may be in the JRI-Poland Database.  The mid-19th century and the very beginning of the 20th century Jewish vital records of this town have been indexed including 3,238 Births; 586 Grooms; 586 Brides and 1,636 Deaths from 1843 - 1901.  The Indexes to non-microfilmed 19th century Kazimierz Dolny Jewish records are housed in the Lublin Archives.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/psa/psastat.htm


Kcynia

Cemetery
Jewish cemetery in Kcynia was established in 18th century. It is located on Wagrowiecka St. The area is not fenced and there are no fragments of Matzevot left.


Khorostkov (Chorostkow)

Formerly in Poland and now in Ukraine.

Research
The JRI-Poland /Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html 

Birth Records
1830-1871, 1874-1898
Marriage Records

None
Death Records

None

ShtetLinks Page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Khorostkov/khorostkov.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/khorostkov/khorostkov.html


Kielce-Radom SIG

Offers a journal dealing with these shtetls that includes data specific to towns within Kielce-Radom  Guberniyas. 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 

Major towns in Kielce-Radom  Guberniyas:
Bialaczow; Bialobrzegi; Bodzentyn; Bogoria; Boleslaw; Brzesko Nowe; Busko-Zdroj; Checiny; Chmielnik; Chomentow; Ciepielow; Cmielow; Dabrowa; Daleszyce; Drzewica; Dzialoszyce; Gielniow; Glinice; Glowaczow; Gniewoszow; Gowarczow; Grabowiec; Granica; Ilza; Iwaniska; Janowiec Wisla; Jastrzab; Jedlinsko; Jedrzejow; Kazanow; Kazimierz; Kielce; Klimontow; Klwow; Konskie; Koprzywnica; Korczyn; Koszyce; Kozienice; Kromolow; Ksiaz Wielki; Kunow; Kurozweki; Kurzelow; Lagow; Lasocin;
Lelow; Lipsko; Lopuszno; Magnuszew; Maliniec; Malogoszcz; Miechow; Morawica; Nowa Tymienica; Odrzywol; Olesnica; Olkusz; Opatow; Opoczno; Osiek; Ostrowiec-Swiet; Ozarow; Pacanow; Pierzchnica; Pilica; Pinczow; Piotrkowice;  Polaniec;  Promnik; Proszowice; Przedborz; Przysucha; Przytyk; Radom; Radoszyce; Rakow; Ryczywol; Sandomierz; Secemin; Sedziszow; Sieciechow; Sienno; Skala; Skalbmierz; Skaryszew; Skarzysko-Kam; Skrzynno; Slawkow; Slomniki; Slupia Nowa; Sobkow; Solec; Starachowice; Staszow; Stopnica; Stromiec; Suchedniow; Szczekociny; Szydlow; Szydlowiec; Tarlow; Wachock; Wasniow; Wieniawa;  Wierzbica; Wierzbnik; Wislica; Wloszczowa; Wodzislaw; Wolanow; Wolbrom; Wysmierzyce; Zarnow; Zarnowiec; Zawichost; Zwolen

Cemetery
1,422 tombstone inscriptions
from the
Kielce cemetery, 1870-1920

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kielce/CemBook/

For additional information:
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig

Holocaust
Surviving Jews in Kielce District
No date; 2,179 persons


   Maps

An outline map of the Kielce-Radom  Guberniyas from 1867 to 1917 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig/maps/KR-outline.html 

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Asher Gutman
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

An offer to lookup individual marriages for this shtetl was made by David Price  on a "if free time available" basis. dprice@sympatico.ca

Research
The Kielce Branch of the Archives holds the records for Bodzentyn, Checiny, Daleszyce, Gowarczow, Kielce, Klwow, Konskie, Korzecko, Lopuszno, Nowa Slupia, Opoczno, Przedborz, Przysucha, Radoszyce and Zarnow. For information see the JRI-Poland web site and click on "Polish State Archives"
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl

A list of towns in this region can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig/TownList.htm   

There are about 1318 indices for the town in the JRI-Poland databaseThese include Marriages 1869-84 and Deaths 1870-84 from the LDS / Mormon microfilms. For subscription and membership information, contact Mark Froimowitz
90 Eastbourne Road
Newton, MA 02459. 

Synagogue 
http://members.tripod.com/~mikerosenzweig/polsynagog.htm


http://members.core.com/~mikerose/polsynagog.htm

Yizkor Book for Kielce
Pinkus Polin, Volume V, Introduction

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kielce/Kielce.html


Kishinev

Research
List of the victims of the 1903 Easter Kishinev Pogrom
(An almost complete list) Kishinev ShtetLinks page

http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetLinks/kishinev/PogromVictims1903.htm


Klevan (Klewan)

Books
   

The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book "The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 18th Century"
Authored by M. J. Rosman amounted to 973.


Klimontow

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichostand dozens of local villages


Klobuck

Located 50.37 north and  15.38 east


  Map

Research
JRI-Poland has added birth, marriage and death records  1849, 1861, 1874, 1885-95
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psaczestochowa.htm


Klodawa

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Avraham Opocinski
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Klodzko

Known as Glatz prior to the end of WWII.

Cemetery
http://www.netgate.com.pl/cemetery/ 


Klwow

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Knyszyn

Located 17 miles northwest of Bialystok on the National road #669 Bialystok-Grajewo.  Pre WW II the town had a population of 1,235 Jews according to WOWW book reference


Kobryn (Kubrin) 

Research
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is George Bill
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Koden

Yizkor Book
"A Shtetl No More, Hackettstown 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Kolbuszowa

This region was located in Galicia and part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.  After WW I, it became part of Poland. Today it is in the Podkarpacie Province (Volvodeship)


Books

"From A Ruined Garden -  The Memorial Books of Polish Jewry" 


"A Jewish Boyhood in Poland"
Authored by Norman Salitz talks about Kolbuszowa 


Cemetery Photos
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/kolbuszowa2/kolbuszowa6.html

http://kirkuty.xip.pl/kolbuszowaang.htm

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0893512/

Emigration
Harvey Kaplan, a member of Gesher Galicia SIG galicia@lyris.jewishgen.org  offers to share his Excel file with anyone interested of over 300 names of Jews who left Kolbuszowa for Ellis Island 1899-1923

Research
Information may be obtained from Peter Jassem jassep@tdbank.ca  There is a Kolbuszowa Region Research Group
http://www.jewishgen.org/

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolbuszowa/kol048e.html

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/

Trip to Kolbuszowa photos
http://www.personal.psu.edu/djk12/images/Poland%20Trip%20Pix/index.htm

Yizkor Book
"Pinkas Kolbishov" (Kolbuszowa Memorial Book)  
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/


Kolbuszowa Region

Some of the towns included in this region:
Blazowa, Debica, Kanczuga, Lancut, Lezajsk, Majdan, Mielec, Nisko, Pilzno, Przeworsk, Ropczyce, Radomysl, Wielki, Rzeszow, Sokolow Mlp., Strzyzow, Tarnobrzeg, Tyczyn, Ulanow
and Zolynia 


   Maps

For further information and maps of the area
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/


Kolno

One of the best sources for information on Kolno and surrounding towns is the Suwalki-Lomza Interest Group
http://www.jewishgen.org/suwalklomza/

Yizkor Book
Sefer Zikaron le-Kehillot Kolno (Kolno Memorial Book)
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html


Kolo

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Arie Butzker
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Kolomyja  (Kolomea)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Ghetto
http://www.deathcamps.org/occupation/kolomyja%20ghetto.html

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Shlomo Horowitz
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
A former Polish town. The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html 

Birth Records
1865-1899
Marriage Records
None
Death Records
None

ShtetLinks page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kolomea/kolomad.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html


Komarno

Town Leader
Israel Pickholtz zach4v6@actcom.co.il is the Town Leader.

Research
Birth and death records have been indexed, but not all the indices have been added to the database.

Births
1878 -1879, 1883-1884, 1888-1890
Deaths
1876, 1878-1994, 1889-1891


Komionka Mala - Kamionka Wielka

Kamionka Wielka and Kamionka Mala are adjacent and are in the Kolomyja (Kolmea) region and is the closest locality to the ex-Galicia border, but not as close to Wien.


Konary

There are several villages of this name in Poland.  One of them is located approximately 5 miles SW of Plawno.


   Maps
 

Map is in Polish but easily readable.
http://www.pilot.pl/index.php3?z_city_id=101422&lang=pl


Koniecpol

JRI-Poland has added birth, marriage and death records
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psaczestochowa.htm


    Maps

http://www.mapofpoland.net/Koniecpol,map.html


Konin

Rabbi Aaronson Ztz"1 of Sanniki, wrote a diary during his days in the Konin concentration camp (aka Czerkow) where the men from Gombin and other towns (Gostynin, Osmolin, Gombin, Zychlin, Sanniki, Jaksice, Plock, Poddebice and others) from the Warthegau were brought in March, 1942.   

This particular area in Poland incorporating lands around Inowroclaw, Bydgoszcz (German: Bromberg) is known as Kujawy (Ku ya veeh) and has been incorporated into Warthegau (Wartheland).  In close proximity to this land, lies Torun, the city of Nicolaus Copernicus which became during WW II part of Reichsgau.


Books

 

"Alei Merorot" ("Leaves of Bitterness")
 Authored by the Rabbi's son, Y. Aaronson, B'nai Brak, 1996 was published in Hebrew and Theo Richmond, in
 his book


"Konin a Quest"
Published by Vintage Press 1996,  Page 429, quotes paragraphs from this diary.  
ISBN 0 09 940981 x,


Cemetery
Inside the Catholic Cemetery, near the entrance, stands a mass grave of Jews who were the victims of the Czerkow (Konin) Forced Labor Nazi Camp

Research
Included in the diary are lists of victims, List of the 60 survivors who were still alive on 7/8/1943, the eve of the famous revolt in the camp and much more.  Read the details in the archives of JewishGen Digest of September 13, 1999, page 12. 
www.jewishgen.com/  


Konskie

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya.  More than 2420 Birth, Marriage and Death Records from 1826 to 1868  JRI-Poland Database website 
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl  

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel created by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum. 
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm

Yizkor Book
Gideon Carmi carmi_nm@netvision.net.il is looking for volunteers to assist him in the project of transliteration of both Konskie and Opoczno
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/baranowice/pages/baranowice_stories_pelta.html

http://www.weizmann.ac.il/materials/Wagner/sites/weizmann.ac.il.materials.Wagner/files/
uploads/scriptajudaicacracoviensia.pdf


Konstantynow Lodzki

Research
Birth, Marriage and Death records
for
1832-55, 1858-65, 1868-76, 1880 - 1889, 1891 - 1897
are on the JRI-Poland database.  There are also records for 1832-55; 1858-65; 1868-76; 1880-80 and
1891-97 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl


Kopotkevichi 

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/04.html


Koprzywnica

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya.   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Kopyczynce - (Kopycznitz)

The Kopycznitzer Rebbe, Avraham Yehoshua Heschel (1887-1967) is the late grandfather of Avrumy Heschel who has information bict@safeaccess.com


Korczyn

A town in  Kielce-Radom Guberniya
http://www.nowykorczyn.com/GeneralHistory.htm

http://www.nowykorczyn.com/


Koriskowola

The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book "The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 18th Century" by M. J. Rosman amounted to 789.
www.jewishgen.org/.../Kielce-Radom%20Journal_Vol%207,%20No%203_Summer%202003.pdf


Kornik

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel created by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum. 
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm


Koronowo (Krone an der Brahe)

Located on the Brda River on local road #23, 24 km north of Bydgoszcz. The German name is Krone an der Brahe 


Kosow  (Kosov, Kosow Lacki)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Kosow Lacki was a village in the Volvodeship of Siedlce, north of Sokolow Podlaski, and about six miles from the Treblinka death camp.

Included in the JRI-PL database.

http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html

Holocaust
The Germans occupied the town in late September, 1939, and soon thereafter established a Judenrat and ghetto.  In the ghetto there were Jews from various locations, including Kalisz, Wyszkow, Mlawa and Ostrow Mazowiecka. During the liquidation of the ghetto in the fall of 1942, the inhabitants were deported to Treblinka.
http://www.edwardvictor.com/Ghettos/Kosow_Lacki.htm

http://www1.yadvashem.org/righteous_new/ukraine/ukraine_hryhoryshyn.html

http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kossovo/kossovo.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.yivoinstitute.org/yizkor/index.php?stid=2&tid=46&aid=&let=K


Kosow Lacki

Located 54 miles ENE of Warsaw and 56 miles SW of BialystokCoordinates are 52'36'/22'09'
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00474.html

Research
1863 to 1899 Birth, Marriage and Death Indices
On line in a searchable database at JRI-Poland
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm


Kowalewo

Located in Slupca Powiat

Research
Film records from the LDS commencing 1868
http://www.fodz.pl/?d=10&w=2&l=en


Kozhanhorodok

It was part of Poland from 1921-1940, and today in Belarus. 

Synagogue
Of all of the synagogues that were burnt by the Nazis around 1942-43, a part of a Mikvah remains.
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/newsletter/luninets.htm


Kozienice

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Books

"The Book of Kozienice: "The Birth and the Destruction of a Jewish Community"


Holocaust
The Rabbi of Kozienice, ha Rav Aharon-Yechiel z"l (1889-1942) and his Talmidim and +/- 10,000 Jews from this town and surrounding towns were put on trains at 8:02 pm destined for Treblinka and never returned.

Research
Sites of possible interest (most in Polish)
www.kozienice.net/

www.kozienice.pl/

www.elko.com.pl/

www.kozienice.dt.pl/ 

Powiat Kozienice
http://www.kozienicepowiat.pl/  


Kozlow

Indexing of records
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/   


Kozminek

Located a few kilometers northeast of Kalisz

Other nearby towns include:

Opatowek, Stawiszyn, Ryuchwal, Tuliszkow, Turek, Dobra, Warta, Sieradz, Blaszki, Ostrow Wielkopolska, Mikstat, Kuzmin
and Pleszew

http://www.suef.dial.pipex.com/main5.html

Research
Indices for the years 1880-1900
Births 1880-1900
Marriages
1885-1886 and 1889-1892


Kozowa

Research
Birth records

From 1877 to 1892  
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/


Krakow (Cracow)

             
Krakow Market Place 1910

Kruke was the Yiddish name of Krakow which, until 1918, was once, for centuries, the capital of Western Galicia as part of the Austrian- Hungarian Empire. Today, this is a city of 747,000, located on the Vistula River and about 100 miles north of Poland's southern border with Slovakia, which dates to the 19th century and was the home of Poland's kings until about 1600. Jewish life once flourished in the town. In the 14th century, this was a prosperous mercantile town, and Jew began to settle here. Dynamic communities of traders and shopkeepers were integral to the character of the town and today once can trace a lot to the former Lustig house.

Before WW II, about 80,000 Jews lived in Krakow; less than 1,000 remained after the war.  Now, a little more than 100 Jews live here, worshiping in the last two active synagogues in the Kazimierz neighborhood, just south of the Old Town.   One of these is the Remuh Synagogue on Szeroka Street, built in 1553, when Krakow's Jewish community was the largest in Europe. 

Everybody in Krakow lived in Dzielnica.  The word means a "city quarter" or district.  Dzielnica Stare Miasto is old town.  Other districts of Krakow include Dzielnica Kazimierz (aka. Jewish) Dzielnica Podgorze (where the ghetto was), Dzielnica Krowodrza, Dzielnica Wesola, Dzielnica Ludwinow, etc.  (See Podgorze below)

The market square is known as "The Ryuek Glowny and is the great piazza of Europe - Siena and Brussels notwithstanding. The Sukiennice, the medieval Cloth Hall, stands in the center of the Rynek, and was begun in the 13th century.  Today it houses a gallery, an arcade of craft and souvenir stalls and the Noworolski Cafe.

Krakow Monuments, Wawel Main Market Square
http://www.krakaddict.com/about_krakow.php


Books

"The Great Jewish Cities of Central and Eastern Europe:
A Travel Guide and Resource Book to Prague, Warsaw, Cracow and Budapest"

Authored by Eli Valley   Buy from Amazon.com Buy from Amazon.com Buy from Amazon.com


Cracow
Views of Cracow
http://www.cracowonline.com/45,A_Must-See_Guide_for_Krakow_New.htm   

Cemetery
 
Jewish Cemetery is located next to the Remu'h Synagogue was destroyed by the Germans and later restored.

Ira Block posted on 1/30/07 "I recently emailed requested photos from the following shuls/cemeteries. If anyone wants copies of anything below just send a request via email to irablock@gmail.com

There is a site that offers 65,000 index entries in their database.  The Krakow Burial register is online for the New Cemetery, 55 ul. Miodowa, for the years 1922-39 and 1945-1961
www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/
 

Districts of Krakow
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Districts_of_Krak%C3%B3w

Ghetto
The Ghetto in Cracow existed until March 13, 1943 when the 68,000 Jews were annihilated - few survived.

The Cracow Ghetto
http://cyberroad.com/poland/jews_ww2.html

Jewish Families of Krakow
http://www.geni.com/projects/Jewish-Families-of-Krak%C3%B3w-Poland/12917

Jews Who Lived in Germany
Registered in Krakow Ghetto in 1940 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translatons.ht

March 14, 2010 marked the 67th anniversary of the final liquidation of this ghetto. 
Photographs and information submitted to the Wiesenthal Center's
http://www.wiesenthal.com/children/ 

Krakow Ghetto Database
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/KrakowGhetto.htm

The Krakow Ghetto website
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/KrakowGhetto.htm 

Holocaust
The Steven Spielberg Jewish Film Archive's Virtual Cinema has footage of Jewish Life In Cracow
http://www.spielbergfilmarchive.org.il/kv/index.html

http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005169

New Cracow Friendship Society
The NCFS is a Holocaust Survivor organization created to unite survivors from Cracow, Poland and its vicinity.  The survivors  joined by their family and friends, share a common philosophy that has guided the membership since its inception in 1965
http://www.newcracowfriendshipsoc.org/newcracowfriendshipsoc.org/Welcome.html

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is David Raizer

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
1935 Krakow Directory
has an extensive listing of house occupants - both Jewish and non-Jewish - for most of the city.   Its importance lies in the fact that this was one of the last directories issued prior to the Holocaust, and that the names of all family members are usually listed.  It can be assumed that the vast majority of Jewish individuals listed in this directory perished during the Holocaust.  

Podgorze District
There is a memorial in the Plac Bohaterow Getta (Heroes of the Ghetto) commemorating the Jews who were gathered here, with only the belongings they could carry, before deportation to death camps.  The Plac memorial consists of 70 metal chairs, symbols of the abandoned furniture of the some 18,000 Jews who were taken away from the Ghetto

Rabbi of Krakow
In 2005 is Avraham Flaks, the first since WW II.

Research Group
The Krakow Research Group has a web page.   Find half of the 1795 Census, Births from 1798 to 1809 and Marriages from 1798 to 1808, along with a search engine, later birth/marriage/death records, early family trees and other Jewish Krakow document links.
http://www.ics.uci.edu/~dan/genealogy/Krakow/index.html
  

Synagogues
There are four synagogues: the Old Synagogue, home of the Museum of Jewish Culture Museum - web site is in English The synagogues still exist.  In the Galitzianer Synagogue, there are pictures of Auschwitz, life in Poland and kids in camps.
http://www.galiciajewishmuseum.org/en/index.html

The Remuh Synagogue; the Temple Synagogue; and the Isaac Synagogue.

Remuh Synagogue and Cemetery
http://www.sacred-destinations.com/poland/krakow-remuh-synagogue-and-cemetery.htm

During WW II, the Old Synagogue in Kazimierz, was desecrated and looted by the Nazis, used as a storage facility, and ultimately destroyed.  The building was rebuilt in the 1950s and currently is the home of the Judaica Branch of the Historical Museum of Krakow

Vital Records are available at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/ 

Over 2,300 Jewish surnames and about 4,000 first names have been extracted from the directory and can be seen by following the "What's New?" link on ShtetLinks Krakow  at 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krakow/default.asp


Krakow Province

The census of the Jewish population in the province of Krakow (which was made in Janow and Czestochowa) shows there were 623 Jews in both cities; half of them lived in Janow.  The year was 1765

http://www.geshergalicia.org/about-gesher-galicia/gesher-galicia-souvenirs/a-guide-to-jewish-genealogy-krakow/


Krakowiec

Included in the JRI-PL database.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html


Krasnik

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html 


Krasniczyn

Research
JRI-Poland Database

www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl


Krasnobrod

Research
Birth records

have been found from 1893 by Sophie Frankenberg sophiemend@hotmail.com


Krasnoszilc (Krasnosielc)

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is David Shachar
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id32.html


Kromolow

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Krosno

Located in the southeast area of Poland in the Krosno region.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0012_0_11648.html

Holocaust
http://articles.latimes.com/2009/feb/16/local/me-survivor-holocaust16


Krotoschin (Krotoszyn)

This town had a large and learned Jewish community since 1423 and had a famous publishing house of Judaica.  The town is located 65 km north northeast of Wroclaw.  It was part of Poland until the dissolution of Poland at the end of the 18th century.  

For the next 140 years, until 1918, it was in Posen Province, Prussia (Grenzmark Posen-Westpreussen).  In 1939 if fell to the Nazi new order - Reichsgau Wartheland. With the rebirth of the Polish Republic in 1918, the town found itself in Poland, and within five years, 95% of the Jewish community transferred to Germany, mostly to Breslau and Berlin.

Community
According to Ruben Frankenstein frankens@uni-freiburg.de there are no Jewish remnants of the old Jewish community whatsoever. 

Research
The FHC has two microfilms of the surviving  Krotoszyn vital records Birth Marriage Death records for the years 1825 to 1841 Film #: 743,091 and BMD  1842-1847 Film # 743,092   Maps detailing the partitions of Poland are at 
http://members.aol.com/genpoland/changes.htm  

There appears to be additional records available, according to Miriam Weiner's " Jewish Roots in Poland" book including Census, Land, Notary and Local Government Records.

The Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw has Death Records from 1846-1943.  It is not known if these are complete.  Further information can be found here.  (go to the link marked Jewish Historical Institute).
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl

For further information about this town but be aware that this site is written in Polish. However, Tomasz Liniecki at liniecki@poczta.onet.com offers to do some translation for free
http://www.krotoszyn.pl/miasto.html


Krynica-Zdroj

In 1880, 5163 people of Jewish origin (46% of the population) lived in this area and were involved in tailoring, engraving, trade in wood and agriculture products. By the end of XIX century Gymnasium of Lord Hirsch Foundation was founded. In 1910 there were 7990 people of the Jewish origin (32% of population) and in 1921 - 9009 people (34%).
http://en.hotelprezydent.com/Autochthon-Population-of-Sadecka-Land

Cemetery
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/krynica-zdroj/12,cemeteries/14911,jewish-cemetery-polna-street-/

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/krynica-zdroj/5,history/

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/krynica.html

http://www.jewishinstitute.org.pl/en/gminy/miasto/791.html


Krynki (Krinky)

Krynki Forum
A site to discuss this shtetl and others.

http://www.diapozytyw.pl/en/site/slady_i_judaica/krynki

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/?a=showCity&action=view&cat_id=3&city_id=747&lang=en_GB

Yizkor Book
There is a Yizkor Book (not translated) Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Haim Sheinberg. There is a Yizkor Book, entitled "Krynki in Khurbn" that was edited by Alex Sofer and published in 1948 in Montevideo, Uruguay by the "Krynki Residents Aid Committee" from Montevideo, Uruguay and Buenos Aires, Argentina.  It appears not to be the same book listed on the JewishGen Yizkor Book database.  There are three sections: people remembered by families from Montevideo; people remembered by families from Buenos Aires; and a list of signature or contributors.  The list is of both Krynker victims and Uruguay and Argentine residents.

"Pinkas Krynki; Memorial Book of Krynki
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 


Krzepice

A small town just northwest of Czestochowa, Poland. 

Holocaust
This Holocaust list includes 252 persons, printed in Hebrew characters on two large sheets of paper, with no information except this title:  "Martyrs Scroll of Landsmen of Krzepice, Poland and its Surroundings who Perished in the Holocaust.

"On behalf of the Czestochowa-Radomsko Area Research Group, I would like to share a list of Krzepice (Poland) Holocaust victims sent to us by long-time Krzepice resident Harry Rozyn."  From a posting by Daniel Kazez.


Maps


http://www.maplandia.com/poland/slaskie/klobuck/krzepice/

Research
JRI-Poland has added birth, marriage and death records for years:
1826-29; 1878-91; 1890-98

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psaczestochowa.htm


Krzywcze Gorne

Research
Included in the JRI-PL database.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html


Ksiaz Wielki

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Kunow

A town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 

http://www.jewishinstitute.org.pl/en/gminy/miasto/516.html


Kurenets


Books



 

"Do Not Go Gentle - A Memoir of Jewish Resistance in Poland, 1941-1945" 
 
Authored by Charles Gelman - (See important information in the book)
 ISBN 0-208-02230-9 


Research
Passengers List from Kurenets

http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/k_ellis.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/EIDB/ellisjw.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/EIDB/ellisjw.html

http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/kurenets.html


Kurow

Research
All available Kurow vital records are available at the JRI-Poland Database.  

The Kurow Jewish births, marriages and deaths between 1810-1847  were filmed by the Mormons, typed by volunteers, and now appear in the  JRI-Poland database. And the subsequent years, 1862-1902 (some registers  apparently didn't survive, and 1855-1857 are being repaired by the Archives)  were recently indexed by the JRI-Poland team!  The PSA records include  Births between 1862-1902 and Deaths between 1871-1902.
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Kurozweki

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig    

Research
There are marriages from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost
, and dozens of local villages


Kuryany (Kuryany, Kurzany)

Population in 1900: 1416 inhabitants (111 Jews), in 1939: 1880 inhabitants (30 Jews)
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/zemla.htm


Kurzelow

Located near Wloszczowa - a small town in Kielce-Radom Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig

http://www.zchor.org/kurzelow/kurzelow.htm


Kuty


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Kwidzyn (German: Marienwerder)

Located on the Wisla River has been part of the Eastern Prussian region until 1945


Lachowicze

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Moshe Indiczki
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Lagow

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig    

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including:
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages


Lancut

Located in central western Galicia. From 1816 to 1944, Lancut was in possession of the Potocki family.  They took proper care of the Lubormirski Place complex which was surrounded with a stunning park with a little romantic castle, picturesque bridges and rose gardens.

Cemetery
There is a Jewish cemetery which contains the grave of Rabbi Horowitz. Ira Block posted on 1/30/07 "I recently emailed requested photos from the following shuls/cemeteries. If anyone wants copies of anything below just send a request via email to irablock@gmail.com

Shtetl Leader
The shtetl leader is Peter Jassem at jassep@tdbank.ca  

 

 

 

 

http://fodz.pl/?d=2&id=1378&l=pl

Synagogue
A baroque synagogue which has a large collection of Judaica exists.    During WW II in 1939, the synagogue was set on fire by the Germans, but thanks to the influence and pleas of Alfred Potocki, the fire was extinguished. 

Yizkor Book 
http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html


Landsberg (Gorowo Pruskie)

There is also a town in East Prussia known as Gorowo Ilaweckie in Olsztyn province. This town, is in northeast Poland and is thirty miles south of Kalingrad, near the USSR border.  It was noted for its grain and cattle market.  3,120 residents lived there in 1939, but only 939 remained.  For a short time, it was also known as Gorowo Pruskie


Lask

At the present time, Lask is in Wojewowodztwo Sieradzkie.  In 1902 it was in Lodz Guberniya.  Lask today is a part of Lodz Voyevodship (Province)  For information contact Joe Ross joeross1220@comcast.net

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lask/

Landmanschaften
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/landshaf.txt


Lasocin

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Lazdijai

Research
Records for this town are a part of the collection of Jewish Vital records located in the Suwalki Archives and not filmed by the Mormons.  Researchers interested in obtaining the JRI-PL Excel spreadsheet containing all of the Lazdijai records of this project covering the years 1856-1896 should contact Lillian Faffer at
lfaffer@juno.com


Lejansk

Cemetery
Ira Block posted on 1/30/07 "I recently emailed requested photos from the following shuls/cemeteries. If anyone wants copies of anything below just send a request via email to irablock@gmail.com


Lelchitsy

Had a Jewish population of 300 around 1919

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/04.html


Lelow

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya 

Research

JRI-Poland has added birth, marriage and death records for years: 1884-95
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psaczestochowa.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Maps

http://www.maplandia.com/poland/slaskie/blachownia/lelow/


Leczyca  (Lynczyz, Leczyca, Lechicha, Lecycza, Lenchicha, Lenchitsha, Lentshits, Linchits, Lintchitz, Lunchich, Luntzitz)

"A D-M Search for Lynczyz gives 6 hits. It includes one Leczyca in Leczyca district, Lodz province - view Page 0867 . This Leczyca which did not show at first in the DM search in ShtetlSeeker seems to be closer. A search can now be made in ShtetlSeeker for towns with the exact name Leczyca, country Poland, using the "Show the distance and direction from:" option, and referring to Lodz. It now gives 5 matches, including two which are less than 25 miles from Lodz:

Leczyca 52 04' 19 13' E M U Poland 24.3 miles NNW of Lodz

Leczyca 51 28' 19 20' E M U Poland 20.4 miles SSW of Lodz

The first one has a little logo with the link to a "JewishGen locality page", which tells us the place was also known as Leczyca, Lechicha, Lecycza, Lenchicha, Lenchitsha, Lentshits, Linchits, Lintchitz, Lunchich, Luntzitz . Now, when I compare Rivka's "Lynczyz" or "Linchess" to "Linchits, Lintchitz", I like it!

I imagine the "other" Leczyca, close by, 20.4 miles SSW of Lodz at 51 45' 19 28', may have also been known by quite similar names. Rivka will have to work to see if one of these places is her husband´s family origin, and which one...

The first one, according to the Locality Page, was in the Kalisz province of the Russian Empire before WW I, and in the Lodz Polish province in between wars. A search for LESLAU in JRI-Poland includes results for Kalisz Gubernya and, sadly among other sources, also for the Lodz ghetto victims list.

Yizkor Book
There are 86 JGFF researchers for the first place, the one with a "JewishGen locality page", and according to the Yizkor Book Database, there is also a Memorial book of Leczyca:

Original Title: Sefer Linshits
English Title: Memorial book of Leczyca
Editor: J. Frenkel, Published: Tel Aviv 1953, Publisher: Former Residents of Leczyca in Israel
Pages: 223, Languages: H"
From a posting by Carlos Glikson
http://www.angelfire.com/or/yizkor/seayzkor.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Leczyca/Leczyca.html


Lesko (Lisko)

Before WWI, Lesko was in the Galicia province and later in the Soviet Ukraine in Drohobyts'ka oblast, Ukraine.  It was in the part of Galicia that is now Poland and is located south of Przemysl and Sanok. 

In 1959, Drohobyts'ka Oblast was incorporated into L'vivska Oblast. While it was part of Galicia, it was under Lemberg' s administrative jurisdiction of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. 
http://www.mapquest.com/cgi-bin/ia_find?link=ia-map-result&event=find_select&level=5


Lezajsk

Cemetery
There is an old Jewish cemetery. 

Lezajsk Town Project
If you would like to know the number of times other surnames appears in the new indices or more about the Lezajsk Town project, please contact Evan Stolbach, Town Leader, Lezajsk
estolb7395@aol.com

Records of Lezajsk marriages 1898-1901
Have been indexed by the JRI-Poland team.  Indexed birth records 1902-1906 . Surnames found in the new index:
ADLER(5), BELLER(4), BOHRER (6), ENGELBERG (7), FELDMAN (4), KATZ (6), LINDENBAUM (4), OEHLBAUM (4), ROSENBLUETH (4), SPATZ (4), SPERGEL (4) SPIRA (4), SPRUNG (6), STELZER (5), WACHTELKOENIG (5), WALDMAN (4), WASSERMAN (4).

Towns mentioned in the new index: (Number of entries follows the name) Rudick (19), Sieniawa (18), Sokolow (11), Ulanow (37), Zolynia (12), Kurylwka (9), Grodzisko (32)

Yizkor Book
"Lizhensk; Sefer Zikaron le-Kedoshei Lizhensk she-Nispu be shoat ha-Natsim" (Memorial Book of the Martyrs of Lezajsk who perished in the Shoah. 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Lida District

Town Names and information from a list of the 1929 Polish business Directory at
http://www.ancestry.com/learn/library/article.aspx?article=5239

Holocaust
The indictment against Leopold Windisch and Rudolf Werner for War Crimes committed in the Lida District, is an important document posted at

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/winwer-tit.htm

Lida Uyezd
 
Lida Uyezd (District) History and Maps of this former Polish town that has been under Russian, Poland and Lithuania flags.  Today, it is a part of Belarus. 
http://www.Jewishgen.org/

Synagogue 
http://members.tripod.com/~mikerosenzweig/polsynagog.htm


Liegnitz (Polish: Legnica)

Located in the Polish Province of Dolnoslaskie in Lower Silesia.

Jewish Cemetery, Skwierzyna
The Jewish cemetery is situated on what is known as Jewish Hill (Judenberg). It covers an area of more than 2 hectares and contains several hundred graves and over 200 gravestones. The oldest visible tomb dates from 1747. Most of the stones are made from sandstone and include many carved symbols and inscriptions in both Hebrew and German. 
http://polandpoland.com/schwerin_jewishcemetery.html

http://www.polishpoland.com/polish_ancestors.htm


Lipnik

Located near Czestochowa and Zarki and Przyrow


Lipno

137.8 kilometers WNW of Warsaw, located on the road between Wloclawek and Torun. A history, including photos is at
www.zchor.org/lipno/lipno.htm

Yizkor Book
"Zeichreines Vegn Lipne"
(Memories of Lipno
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Lipowice  (Lipowica, Lypovytsya) 

Southeast of Dolina -  currently it is known as Lypovytsya  at 4846 2403 in the western part of Ukraine. Lipowica and near by village Suchodol (2.5 miles apart) are located deep in the mountains in the valley of Checheva River surrounded by 3000' + peaks of the Eastern Beskid. Actually village name is taken from the 4,000' high peak Lipowica (also known in Hungarian as Syhlos). Village Suchodol lists two businesses and both were owned by Jews: DIAMAND and NAGEL.

You should add to your search list Suchodol as it is obviously a sister village of Lipowica since WOWW claims 39 Jewish population in this village.

I couldn't identify even traces of the Jewish population in 1880 in Lipowica or Suchodol in "Geographic Dictionary of Kingdom of Poland" which is not surprised at all. In the both topographic maps, pre WWI and the fairly current one of the region, there are Mogen David icons which identify Jewish cemeteries or their remains. Lets take a 14 miles long trip North through the valley on the road parallel to the Checheva River from Lipowica (mile "0") to Dolina, region's administration Centre and the district court seat.

Mile '0' - Lipowica
Jewish cemetery
west from the village on the river's right bank

Mile '2.5'
Sister village Suchodol - Jewish cemetery on the village outskirt upstream the river (not shown on the modern map)

Mile '4.7'
Village Luhy
Not identified in WOWW and Pinkas HaKehillot, but 1929 Directory lists three businesses in the village, two of them are own by Jews: B. DIAMAND, wood (same name as businessman in Suchodol) and J. H. JOLLES, water flour mill owner, Jewish cemetery.

Mile '8.2'
Village Spas,
Jewish pre WWII population 50 souls, amongst them P. LUSTIG, tavern and liquor store owner. Pre WWI map identifies three Jewish sites, none are shown today.  Another town name to be added to your search list.

At Spas there is a road fork - right road to town Rozniatow, ~5 miles distance (Jewish population 1,349) and the left road goes to Dolina (Jewish population 2,014 souls).

2.
Lipowica Records

Where are the Jewish records -
for all the above mentioned in our trip villages and shtetls:
Lipowica, Suchodol, Luhy, Spas, Rozniatow and Dolina?

Logically, vital records should be located in Dolina. Dolina was the District's Administrative Centre and seat of the Judicial districts from 1867 and it has been confirm as the Centre town in the all further Galicia divisions of 1876, 1890, 1904 and 1906.

Dolina
status as the Jewish Administrative District Center is confirmed by Gesher Galicia 1877 listings
http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/towns/admin__dist_.html

and as the General Administrative District Centre at:
http://www.pgsa.org/Inter/galizien.htm

Furthermore, during the interwar (1918-1939) Poland administration period, Dolina has retain its status as the Administrative District Centre, as all above mention towns were part of Dolina Powiat (district).

And there is a question: where are the Dolina vital records?  In two books (Poland and Ukraine/Moldova), Dolina is listed only once as the depository of Dolina land records are located in Lwów, not a word about location of the vital records.

Yizkor Book
"
Referred by WOWW, Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland, vol. II - Eastern Galicia, ed. 1980, p.436 Lists Lipowice in Przemysl region. This village was actually known as Lipowica and together with near by Zakluczyn was incorporated within town Dukla after WWI. For some unknown reasons ShtetlSeeker and MapQuest claim that Lipowica in Poland still there, when it is not.

Pinkas HaKehillot
does not recognize Lipowica in Dolina region, but town was there, still there, and 1929 Directory quotes D. LUSTIG, the tobaconeer. Actually, 1929 lists five local business from which four were Jewish beside LUSTIG, there are names MAJER, BLEI and LONDNER.


Bolechow and Rozniatow
Two major Jewish towns in Dolina Administrative District, and both were the seats of the Judicial Districts. Bolechow records are located in AGAD Archives under "Bolechow", but not the Rozniatow's. Any suggestion as to the "missing" records for Dolina in AGAD Archives would be appreciated."  From a posting by Alexander Sharon


Lipsko  (WOJEWÓDZTWO MAZOWIECKIE) (Alternate names: Lipsko [Pol, Rus], Lipsk  [Yid]. Липско [Rus], ליפסקו-[Yid])

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya.  28 miles SE of Radom, 17 miles E of Iłża (Drilch). Jewish population: 1,468 (in 1897), 1,376 (in 1921). This is not Lipsk, W of Grodno. Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego  (1880-1902), V, p. 295: "Lipsko" #1. Lipsko is a town in Mazowsze Voivodship that is the capital of Lipsko Powiat with a population of 5,895 in 2004. Powiat Lipski is a unit of territorial administration and local government in the Masovian Voivodeship in east-central Poland since January 1, 1999. Its administrative seat and only town is Lipsko, 127 km (79 mi) S of Warsaw. The 2006 total population is 36,669, out of which the population of Lipsko is 5,826. Jews began to settle in 1676. The 1.5 ha cemetery on ulica Czechowskiego was established in 17th century. The last burial took place in 1942. The cemetery was devastated during WWII. No fragments of Matzevot remain since the site now is a park. [June 2009]
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/city/lipsko-463/

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/lipsko.html

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including:  
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica,  Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz,  Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost,
and dozens of local villages


Lissa (Leszno)

http://www.answers.com/topic/leszno


Liuboml 

A small village
http://www.encyclopediaofukraine.com/pages/J/E/Jews.htm


L~o'dzkie Provinces  - Cities and Municipalities  

Includes:

Belchatow; Radomsko; Tomaszow; Mazowiecki and Tuszyn; Grocholice;  Kamiensk; Piotrkow Trybunalski; Przedborz; Rozprza; Sulejow; Sulmierzyce; Szczercow, Ujazd
and Zarnow

http://www.rootsweb.com/~pollodz/ 


Lodz

The town of Lodz in Poland is not pronounced anything like 'lodge'.  It is pronounced 'woodge'.  The Russian letter 'P' is pronounced 'R'.  The city was one of the largest Jewish centers at the outbreak of WW II with a Jewish population of 202,497 in 1931 - nearly 33% of the population of Lodz. Of the Jewish population after WW II, only 870 survived.  Most of the Jews were murdered in the camps of Plasz - near Cracow, Belzec, Sobibor, Majdanek and Auschwitz-Birkenau (Oswiecim). Several large textile mills were owned by Jews including the Israel K. Poznanski plant, one of the largest in Europe.

Home Page with plenty of links to pertinent subjects relating to Lodz and Poland as well as photos 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/Lodz.htm  

Birth, Marriage and Death records,
From 1899 and 1900
On-line in the JRI-Poland database.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl

Cemetery
Chevra Kadisha Records
Of 19th century Lodz, including more than 5,000 deaths and burials listened in Stary Cmentarz Zydowski w Lodzi (the Old Cemetery of Lodz), published by the Jewish Community of Lodz in 1938.

http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/pfh-ss-s-z.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/lodzchev/lodzchevrakad.htm

http://www.diapozytyw.pl/en/site/slady_i_judaica/tarnow

Ghetto
On September 16, 1942, the "resettlement" of the ghetto is completed.  Approximately 55,000 Jews and 5,000 Gypsies were deported to the killing center of Chelmno.
http://cyberroad.com/poland/jews_ww2.html

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/lodz.htmlLodz

http://www.pharao.com/cam/Europe/Poland/?Blaszki/transportation.html  

The Lodz ghetto was the deportation destination for Jews from all of East Europe.  The list of all Jews incarcerated in ... and deported to the Lodz ghetto ... is in the Lodz Archives. 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/newdisc.htm 

Lodz Ghetto Database
A record of the 240,000 inhabitants of the Lodz Ghetto. There are approximately 242,000 separate entries on the database, which tracks the movement of individuals into, within, and out of the ghetto.
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland/LodzGhetto.html

and this data is also now included in the All Poland Database and JewishGen's Holocaust Database:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland 

"Lodz Ghetto List"
The Judenrat of the Lodz ghetto kept detailed records of the 200,000 residents of the ghetto.  These records were published as "Lodz Names", a 5 volume book, in 1989, as a joint effort of Yad Vashem and the Organization of Former Residents of Lodz in Israel (OFRLI).

This book is available at the Yad Vashem library, the US Holocaust Memorial Museum (Yizkor book section), and the libraries of Stanford University, Notre Dame University and the University of Toronto.   The list is also held by OFRLI in Tel Aviv and may possibly be with other organizations.   

"The Story of Chaim Rumkowski and the Jews of Lodz"
In this Swedish-produced film from 1984, Director Peter Cohen used archival footage and previously unseen photographs taken by people in the Lodz ghetto and by Jewish Council photographers to document the activities of the Jewish Council, the conditions of daily life for ghetto inhabitants, Rumkowski's relationship to the Nazis, the gradual disintegration of the ghetto, and the deportations to the death camps. Available from Cinema Guild for purchase or rental (I have no commercial interest in this film) (note, the price given is for library purchase. Contact them at their email for home video prices: info@cinemaguild.com
http://tinyurl.com/y8j8b5  


Photo by Henryk Ross of Lodz Ghetto
http://www.radio.cz/en/article/62330

Lodz-Names: List of the Ghetto Inhabitants, 1940-1944
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/lodzname.htm#Lodz-Names

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust

Ghetto Lodz Registry book
http://www.zchor.org/LODZ.HTM

A Record of the 200,000 Inhabitants of the Lodz Ghetto
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/lodzname.htm#Lodz-Names

On January 19, 1945, the Lodz Ghetto was overrun by the Soviet Red Army.  Of the nearly 200,000 Jewish inhabitants squeezed by the Nazis into the ghetto in 1940, fewer than 800 remained.  A network of 117 workshops, employing some 95 percent of the adult population, was so productive for the German war effort that Lodz was the last ghetto to be liquidated
http://jewishcurrents.org
 

Holocaust
Prior to World War II, one-third of the 665,000 inhabitants of the Polish city of Lodz were Jewish.  On September 8, 1939, the city was captured by the Germans and renamed "Litzmannstadt". In 1940, a ghetto was created and sealed off.  Transports arrived from many other towns in Poland and throughout Europe.

Population registry books were kept by the Judenrat (Jewish council) of the Lodz ghetto, from the time of establishment of the Ghetto in February 1940 until just prior to its liquidation in August 1944.  The records were maintained by apartment address, and were updated on a continuing basis.  In addition to the names of the residents in an apartment, these records sometimes include the former addresses, dates of birth, occupation, and date of deportation or death of the individual.

http://www.deathcamps.org/occupation/lodz%20ghetto.html

http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005071

Indices to 10,876 city of Lodz
Birth, marriage and death records from 1899 and 1900 On-line in the JRI-Poland database.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl

Indices to the city of Lodz
For the year 1901 Indexed.  Additional years awaiting posting are: 1902 (6,952 records); 1903 (6,405 records); 1904 (7,290 records) and 1905 (6,088 records)

Indices to 50,000 Jewish birth, marriage and death records are being added to the JRI-Poland database.  These records are from the years 1878 through 1898.  There are more than 35 towns in this region.  
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-Pl  

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Avraham Zelig 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/Lodz.htm 

Guide To Researching Jewish Vital Records in the Lodz Archives.  Shirley Flaum, Lodz ShtetLinks coordinator:  Seflaum@aol.com    

http://www.jewishgen/Shtetlinks/Lodz/ids.htm

Information relating to researching Aubrey Jacobus aubrey@jacobus.org Family research 
http://www.mjacobus.freeserve.co.uk/  

Surnames
Found in the database
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/lodzsurn2.htm

Research Group (LARG) home page is at 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/LARG.htm

ShtetLinks Home Page
Offers wonderful information about this town and travel to Poland. Symcha Keller is the current head of the Jewish Community in Lodz and his address is on this web page, along with the Lodz Ghetto List, published as "Lodz  Names: List of the Ghetto Inhabitants, 1940-44". 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/Lodz.htm

Surnames - a record of the 200,000 inhabitants of the Lodz Ghetto
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/lodzname.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/lodzsurn2.htm

Traveling Today to Lodz
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lodz/today.htm

Yad Vashem
With the assistance of the Organization of Former Residents of Lodz in Israel, was able to purchase a copy of the registers from the Polish State Archives.   The result was published by the Organization of Former Residents of Lodz in Israel in a five volume set: "Lodz-Names: List of the Ghetto Inhabitants, 1940-1944", and was later digitized by volunteers at Yad Vashem. From a posting by Warren Blatt

Lodz District Towns in the JRI-Poland List

Aleksandrow Lodzki; Bedkow; Biala Rawska; Bielawy; Boleslawiec; Bolimow; Brzeziny; Burzenin; Dzialoszyn; Glowno; Jezow; Koniecpol; Konstantynow Lodzki; Lask; Lodz; Lowicz; Lututow; Lutomiersk; Nowa Brzeznica; Nowe Miasto nad Pilica; Ozorkow; Pabianice; Pajeczno; Poddebice; Praszka; Rawa Mazowiecka; Skiernewice; Sobota; Strykow; Szadek; Warta; Widawa; Wielun; Wieruszow; Wolborz; Zdunska Wola; Zgierz; Zloczew 


Lodz Province
http://www.rootsweb.com/~pollodz/


List of all towns
For which there are Jewish vital record registers located in the Lodz Archives

Aleksandrow Lodzki

Bedkow

Belchatow

Biala Rawska

Bielawy

Boleslawiec

Bolimow
 

Brzeziny
 

Burzenin

Dzialoszyn

Glowno

Grocholice

Jezow

Kamiensk

Koniecpol

Konstantynow Lodzki

Lask

Lodz

Lowicz

Lutomiersk

Lututow

Nowa Brzeznica

Nowe Miasto n. Pilica

Ozorkow

Pabianice

Pajeczno

Piotrkow Trybunalski

Plawno

Poddebice

Praszka

Radomsko

Rawa Mazowiecka

Rozprza

Sieradz

Skiernewice

Sobota

Strykow

Sulejow

Sulmierzyce

Szadek

Szczercow

Tomaszow Mazowiecki

Tuszyn

Ujazd

Warta

Widawa

Wielun

Wieruszow

Wolborz

Zdunska Wola

Zgierz
 

Zgierz
 

Zloczew   

Click on "Lodz (phase 2)" in the drop-down menu.
For more information about how to participate in this project and receive the entire file now,
please contact me. Roni Seibel Liebowitz, Lodz Archive Coordinator, Lodz ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/index.htm

Lodz Area Research Group
(LARG)
From a posting by Roni S. Liebowitz roni19@optonline.net
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/LARG.htm
 
Update to all towns in the Lodz Archives project
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psastat.htm

Virtual Jewish Lodz
A web site created by Jacek Walicki. The site is in Polish  
http://www.pdi.net/~ZydziWLodzi/
 

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/


Lomazy

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Pinkas_poland/pol7_00273.html


Lomianki

A small town near Warsaw,  Notable families there included RECHTMAN, RAABE, KORENSZTEJN and BLOCK.
http://tinyurl.com/b6jcpr

http://www.um.warszawa.pl/zmh/pp.htm


Lomza


http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/lomza-talmudtorah.jpg

Prior to 1795, Jews were forbidden to live in Lomza, however, with the coming of the Prussian administration, Lomza and the surrounding area became part of New East Prussia and Jews then settled the area. One of the best sources for information on Kolno and surrounding towns is the Suwalki-Lomza Interest Group
http://www.jewishgen.org/suwalklomza/

Information about the restoration of the Jewish cemetery and a partial listing of the names of the deceased are available by contacting George Puchall at  gpuchall@aol.com
http://www.lomza.org   


The Lomza Archives branch
Possesses vital statistic records of the Lomza Jewish community from 1827-1900.  The costs as of April 1, 2001 were quoted as follows:
 
Initial payment for checking what materials are available in order to arrange a reply to your inquiry - $30; cost of a one hour of research - $15; Xerox copy of 1-2 page document  - $10.  In case of a negative result the initial payment is not reimbursed, and in the case of a positive result, the initial payment is deducted form the total amount.  If you agree to the beginning of a research, you make an initial payment for $30 to the bank account as listed here:
Archiwum Panstwowe w Bialymstoku Powszechny
Bank Kredytowy S.A.
w Warszawie 1 Oddzial
w Bialymstoku 11101154-411150000686 

and send  copy of a document confirming the payment to the address of the Archive and they will start the research upon its receipt

Cemetery
Lomza Jewish Cemetery Foundation
www.lomza.org

Lomza Cemetery Photographs Index
http://members.aol.com/rechtman/index.html

Guberniya Information
Lomza Guberniya -
Kolno, Rajgrod and Lomza
http://groups.msn.com/germangenealogy/alsacelorraine.msnw

Lomza Memorial Project
www.zchor.org/losice/losice.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

Complete Document about the Lomza Yizkor book Index Project
http://members.aol.com/rechtman/index.html

Lomza Guberniya
Lomza Gubernia originated surnames
http://www.jewishgenealogy.com.ar/lomza/ancestors_a.html
 


Lopienka

Located near Buk, Streznica and Smolnik - Type in the city of Lopienka


Maps

http://www.mapquest.com/  


Lopuszno

http://www.jewishgen.org/communities/trees/g.asp?f=-514049


Losice

A legal document granting Losice the  privileges of a town signed by King Alexander Jegiellonczyk on May 10,1505 in Radom. It is written in Latin.
www.losice.pl/archiwum.html

Yizkor Book
"
Loshits: le-zeykher an umgebrakhter Kehila" (Losice: In Memory of a Jewish Community Poland) 

http://www.zchor.org/losice/yizkor1.htm

On page 256, one finds a photo of a gravestone marker with the names of seven Losice Jews who were killed by the Nazis in Losice.  The caption states that this marker is at the Jewish cemetery in Siedlce.  
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Loszic

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Yosef Ben-Yaacov 
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Lototow

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Gershon Plata 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Lowicz

Cemetery
There is a Jewish cemetery that predates the cemetery at Skiernewice
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl
Lowicz

Research
JRI-Poland Database website
 
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl


Lubaczow

A small village located around 50 km NNE of Przemysl in the southeastern corner of Poland in the Podkarpacie District previously known as the Przemysl District.  In 1931, there were 6,291 citizens of which 1,794 were Jews. See photos and learn about this town at 
http://members.nbci.com/_XMCM/lubaczow/index.htm

Cemetery
"
Religious Life", a text
"
Learning about the Gravestones from Lubaczow"
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lubaczow/JewishCemetery.htm

"A Beginner's Tutorial"
Here you will find under different sections with English explanations and Hebrew texts; Introduction; The Stone; Two Small Letters in Hebrew; Decorations; The Hebrew Calendar - A Mini Dictionary; The Hebrew Language; The End.  The text is based on the gravestones photographed at the Jewish Cemetery in Lubaczow by Howard Bodenstein in 1999 and shown on the web site.  There are still around 1,600 gravestones

http://members.nbci.com/_XMCM/lubaczow/bgntut.htm

Eva Floersheim has also authored "The Tree That Devours Jewish Gravestones" 
http://www.zwoje.com/zwoje33/text15.htm 

Holocaust
"Remembering the Jews of Lubaczow"
Information about the life of the Jews before WWII and their fate during Holocaust
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lubaczow/

Newspapers
The newspapers read by the Jewish community were "Kurier Codzienny" and "Nowy Dziennik"and "Chwila".  In the Yiddish language: "Haint", (Moment) and some illustrated magazines.  Those papers were published in Warsaw and Krakow before WW II.

Yizkor List
Includes around 860 names of victims - see my
Holocaust page for further information under "Birkenau".  
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.htm 

http://oleszyce.zamki.pl/  (in Polish)


Lubartow

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Mina Vesong 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Yizkor Book
"Khurban Lubartow; A Matzewa Lubartow un Lubartow Kedoshim" 
(The destruction of Lubartow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html 


Lubien Kujawski (Lubin)

Located 77 miles (124 Kilometers) west of Warsaw


Lublin

Lublin 1941 - KLUVIK ARCHIVES
http://www.vilnaghetto.com/gallery2/v/latvia/album91/Dvinsk_Ghetto_Jews.jpg.html Tilsit

Boasted the world's largest Talmudic school, Jeshybot (Yesyhbot).  The building survived WW II and now is the Medical Academy (The Collegium Maius).  Three hundred thousand Jews from the province were murdered. 
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Lublin.html

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/lublin/5,history/

http://lublin.pl/

http://www.niecodziennik.mbp.lublin.pl/images/stories/polka_niecodziennika/2007/20070614_sciezki_pamieci/
sciezki_pamieci_6.pdf

Archives
Search the archives for the Feb.  13, 2000 JewishGen Digest, page 11.  Also 
http://www.pharao.com/cam/Europe/Poland/?Blaszki/transportation.html 


Books
      

"A Guide to Jewish Lublin and Surroundings"
Authored by Andrzej Trzcinski and published in 1991.  A small book focused on Jewish history and culture in Lublin.  Contains three different self-guided walking tours around Lublin, as well as four car excursions.  Describes both Jewish and non-Jewish sites.  Includes maps and illustrations.


"Horrors, Death and Destruction - Experiences of a Holocaust Survivor"
Authored by David Zabludovsky is located at:
http://www.zabludow.com/yiskor7DavidZabludovsky.html



Jewish Cemetery on Walecznych Street

Cemetery      

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Poland/Poland.html

There is a Jewish cemetery with graves of famous rabbis dating from the beginning of the 16th century.  In the cemetery, tombstones dating back to the early 1500s still remain.  The new cemetery is still used by the small Jewish community of Lublin.

An offer to lookup individual marriages for this shtetl was made by David Price  dprice@sympatico.ca on a "if free time available" basis

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/lublin.html

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/konskowolai.html

Ghetto


Lublin Ghetto
In the Lublin branch of the Polish State Archives, there is a comprehensive list of the residents of the Majdan Tatarski Ghetto.  A copy exists at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum.
http://www.deathcamps.org/occupation/lublin%20ghetto.html

History
Grodzka Gate - NN Theatre Centre
http://teatrnn.pl/kalendarium/node/1510/history_of_the_%E2%80%9Cgrodzka_gate_%E2%80%93_nn_theatre%E2%80%9D_centre 

Holocaust
I The Majdanek death camp is about 2 miles from the town.  More than 100,000 Jews were killed there
http://www.jewishjournal.com/a_jew/item/the_shoes_of_majdanek_39100812/

http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/ghettos/lublinlabourcamps.html

Polish Jews in WW II
http://www.humboldt.edu/rescuers/book/Makuch/conditionsp.html

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/

Lublin - Majdanek
http://cyberroad.com/poland/jews_ww2.ht

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is David Stockfish
 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
There are on-going projects for 82 towns in the Lublin area which have records stored in the Lublin branch of the Polish State Archives.  So far, already indexed are the following towns:
Lublin, Lubartow, Kazimierz Dolny, Slawatycze, Michow Lubartowska, Dubienka, Wlodawa, Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Biala Podlaska, Kamionka, Wieniawa, Piaski, Irena, Belzyce. 
For further information, contact Robinn Magid
RobinnM@aol.com

"If your family was in the City of Lublin in the 20th century, particularly if you think your family was in Lublin the 1940's, please contact me privately and let me know your family names.  I may have information of genealogical value to your research and you may be interested to learn about my work with Lublin books and records." From a posting by Robinn Magid

List of Residents
There is a list of residents of a tenement building in Lublin located at ul. Krawiecka 41 who lived there as of June 12, 1939
http://www.jewishgen.org/ 

Surviving Jews in Lublin - 1945; 2393 persons

Synagogue

There is also a small synagogue where there is a display of ritual and historical documents of the former Jewish community.

Yeshiva
Inside the former yeshiva, there remains an old lecture room as well as a commemorative room showing the history of the building.
Ira Block posted on 1/30/07 "I recently emailed requested photos from the Yeshiva. If anyone wants copies just send a request via email to
irablock@gmail.com

Lublin Gubernia originated surnames
http://www.jewishgenealogy.com.ar/lublin/ancestors_a.html


Lubno

A town in the Brzozow district, Dynow sub district.  This area is now in Poland

Research
So far, no Jewish records have been found for this district according to a posting by Suzan Wynne on 4-3-02


Luboml - (Libivne)

This village disappeared from the face of the earth on October 1941 when the Nazis destroyed it.

Northwestern view of the Great Synagogue, with shtiblekh (small prayer houses) at right, ca. 1930. Collection of Polska Akademia Nauk, Instytut Sztuki 

Synagogue

http://www.luboml.org/


Lubycza Krolewska

Research
Included in the JRI-PL database.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html


Lukow  ( (Pol. Łuków; Rus. Lukov)

A town in the province of Lublin, E. Poland. By the 15th century there was considerable Jewish settlement in Lukow with a developed autonomous organization. A responsum (no. 59) of R. Meir b. Gedaliah *Lublin (1558–1616) mentions the synagogue of Lukow, which was destroyed by fire. Joel *Sirkes (the Bah) served as rabbi of the community at the end of the 16th or the beginning of the 17th century. At the time of the *Chmielnicki massacres (1648–49) the community suffered heavy material losses and the new synagogue was burned down. In 1659 the Jews of Lukow were granted a royal privilege which confirmed their former rights to live in the town, to acquire land and houses, and to engage in commerce and crafts; they were also authorized to erect a synagogue and maintain a cemetery. In 1727 a poll tax of 120 zlotys was imposed on the community. With the progress of economic activities in the town during the second half of the 18th century the Jewish population considerably increased. In the middle of the 18th century a dispute broke out between the communities of Lukow and Miedzyrzec Podlaski over the question of their authority over the small neighboring communities. According to the census of 1765, there were 543 Jews (137 families) there. During the 1780s the rabbi of the community was Samson Zelig b. Jacob Joseph ha-Levi, the author ofTeshu'ot Hen (Dubno, 1797)
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0013_0_12854.html

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Yaacov Kesselbrenner 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Lupkow  (Cisna, Tisna [Pol, Ger], ציסנה- Hebrew)

Cemetery
Located  16 miles S of Lesko (Linsk), in SE Poland, near the borders with Slovakia and Ukraine. 1921 Jewish population: 118. lownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego (1880-1902), I, p. 705: "Cisna".  Cisna village is the seat of the Gmina Cisna in Lesko County in the Subcarpathian Voivodeship and in the Solinka valley between the Bieszczady mountains.  A narrow gauge railroad was built between 1890 and 1895 to Nowy Łupków and in 1904 to Kalnicy. Cisna was in Bieszczady and was well-known holiday resort, growing to 60.000, during the inter-war years. WWII destroyed almost all of the village. The village was burned by Ukrainian soldiers in 1946. map and listing of villagers prior to WWII. cemetery photos. Holocaust: "Jews being made to clean out latrines with their hands (at Cisna, Kalisz and other localities); to collect horse-droppings in the market-place with their hands and to put them into their caps and pockets (at Cisna)" Source [April 2009]
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/cisna.html

Research
All Birth, Marriage & Death, including Parish results for Lupkow 
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?gl=34&rank=1&sbo=t&gsbco=Sweden&gsln=Lupkow

 


Lutomiersk

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel recreated by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm

For information contact Joe Ross joeross1220@comcast.net


Lwów (Lwow, L'viv, Lvov, Lviv) 

Once part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and then Poland - between the wars -- it became part of the Soviet Union in 1939.  When WW II began, Ukraine's Jewish population numbered some 1.5 million, with 200,000 in Lvov

Holocaust
The Steven Spielberg Jewish Film Archive's Virtual Cinema has footage of Jewish Life In Bialystok
http://www.spielbergfilmarchive.org.il/kv/index.html

"Zaglad Zydow lwowskich"
Authored by Dr. Filip Friedman and published in Lodz in 1945.  It is in English at the following site:
http://www.mankurty.com/holocaust/?page_id14

"This is the first monograph ever to have been published on Lwow. It was published in December 1945 as the fourth publication of the Central Jewish Historical Commission  (CJHC) of the  Central Committee of Jews in Poland (Centralny Komitet Zydow w Polsce, CCJP).

The CCJP was created in Lublin in October 1944, at the initiative of the KPWN (AKA Lublin government, the Moscow governed communist Polish government). In November 1944 the CCJP
brought Friedman from Lwow to preside over the CJHC, also still in Lublin. On January 1, 1945, the KPWN declared itself to be the Provisional Government of the Republic of Poland (Rzad Tymczasowy Republiki Polskiej, RTR) and on 18 January, the RTRP, to further assess it legitimacy, moved to Warsaw. At the end of February 1945, the CCJC moved to Warsaw and the CJHC to Lodz.

Branches of the CJHC were opened that year in other towns that were gradually liberated from the Nazi occupation, and the CJHC began publication, too. In 1945, it mainly published booklets of instructions on how to gather materials and compile evidence for their historical project and only two historical publications. The first was an annotated anthology of survivors' testimonies published by the Krakow branch in February-March 1945. The other one, the 4th official publication and the last for 1945, was Friedman's monograph Zaglada Zydow lwowskich (the Extermination of the Jews of Lwow).

This was a ground-breaking, revolutionary and out of the official Soviet/Communist line of the time in many aspects, including its timing of publication. In December 1945, the same month Friedman published his monograph on the murder of the Jews of Lwow, the Pravda and the Izvestia (official organs of the Soviet Communist Party) published the official Report No 6 of the Soviet Extraordinary State Commission for ascertaining and investigating crimes perpetrated by the German Fascist invaders and their accomplices, and the damage inflicted by them on citizens, collective farms, social organizations, State enterprises and institutions of the U.S.S.R. Now, this Report No 6 was devoted to Lvov, and was part of the files prepared by the above mentioned Soviet Extraordinary Investigative Commission for the upcoming Nuremberg Trials as part of the Soviet Prosecution files. According to the Soviet/Communist line, firstly Lwow was considered as a Soviet and not a Polish Town from September 1939 and all its citizens were considered to have been Soviet citizens.

Subsequently and also according to the same line, no particular attention was paid to any particular national persecution by the Nazis. Soviet citizens were persecuted as Soviet citizens as such. Material damage was caused to Soviet material as such. Inter alia, numbers of Polish Jewish refugees from Western and Central Poland who fell into the Soviet Territories (that is, in fact Eastern Poland but that the Soviet annexed after having invaded it then considered it to be fully Soviet from 1939 and on) were largely inflated so as to support the contemporary Soviet propaganda of the Soviets having saved some 300,000 Polish refugees by evacuating them to the Soviet hinterlands, etc.

Now, Friedman was collecting documents and testimonies throughout the Nazi occupation while in hiding in Lwow and continued immediately upon the liberation of the town, from July to November 1944, when he moved to Lublin to preside the Polish CJHC. His booklet, contrary to the Official Soviet Report, refers to Lwow as a Polish town and the Jews - both local and refugees, as Polish Jews and not Soviet ones. He all but openly accuses the special units of the NKVD and SMERSH of making disappear Jewish documents by stating that the almost "complete absence of authentic official documents" and that the archives of the Judenrat of Lwow, for example, "could not be found, not even in August." (Documents of the Statistical Department of the Judenrat of Lwow, for example, were indeed, just as he hinted at in 1945, found in the State Archives of Ukraine after the fall of the USSR in the 1990s.)They were acquired by Yad Vashem.). He thus based his research, he explains, on the documentation he gathered himself in Lwow during the whole period; on Soviet "reports and material assembled by the Soviet Extraordinary Investigative Commission" and on a number of protocols, testimonies by the witnesses and diaries held by the CJHC in Poland.

He reminds that among the Jewish refugees in Lwow were also refugees from other counties of the Province of Lwow itself that under the Ribbentrop-Molotov Agreement remained under Nazi Occupation in 1939 and did not necessarily arrive from Western or Central Poland. According to his sources, he numbers the Jewish refugees in Lwow at  about 50-60,000. NKVD documents, containing lists of deported Polish citizens from Galicia and other Polish occupied provinces and analyzed after the fall of the USSR by several researchers show that his estimate was astonishingly accurate: the second wave of deportations, in June 1940, from these Provinces to the Soviet hinterland was that of refugees it contained mainly if not exclusively Jewish refugees and they numbered "64,533 persons [...] who stayed [...] especially in Lwow" (see: Piotr Eberhardt, Political Migrations In Poland 1939-1948, Warsaw, 2006, available from the web site of the Polish Academy of Science, Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization, p.19).
http://www.igipz.pan.pl/zpz/Political_migrations.pdf 

Speaking of Deportations, Friedman is the first to explicitly write - in 1945! -  that these refugees were deported already in 1940 by the Soviets which had nothing to do with allegedly evacuating them in 1941. He also clearly opposes the legend of any alleged organized Evacuation of Jews by the Soviets in 1941 when writing that a few thousands, mainly communist youth and political figures "tried to escape to the Soviet Union" but "only a handful reached Russia" and "several thousand" young Jewish men were conscripted into the retreating Red Army. This also is confirmed by more recent research based on NKVD and other Soviet documents opened after the disintegration of the USSR.

Now, Friedman left Poland and the CJHC around July 1946 following a very harsh internal debate that echoed the political situation in Poland where the Local communist party was trying to take over and their representatives both in the CCJP and the CJHC were trying to turn the CJHC into an official organ in service of the government. He went to work in the Central Historical Commission of Liberated Jews in the US Zone in Germany, where he continued to collect testimonies until 1948, when he left for the US and joined the YIVO. With the new testimonies gathered in Germany and with more German documents, he published in the US an enlarged version of his Destruction of the Jews of Lwow, sometimes in 1948-1949.

Sometimes in the early 1950's, after Yad Vashem was opened in 1953, he went to Israel and collected more testimonies there, and in Gelber N., Ed., Encyclopaedia of the Jewish Diaspora, A memorial library of Countries and Communities, Poland Series, Vol. IV, Lwow, Part I, Jerusalem, Encyclopaedia of the Diaspora, 1956  there is a third, even more enlarged version of this booklet, unfortunately, Hebrew only. One of these 3 versions is included in Friedman Philip (Firedman Ada June, Ed.,), Road to Extinction, Conference on Jewish Social Studies, The University of Michigan, 1980 (but I do not know which of the versions it is not whether it was re-edited or not). From a posting by Rivka Schirman nee Moscisker

The Polish original for those who are able and prefer is also available online 
http://www.mankurty.com/holocaust/?p#

     


Magnuszew

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Majdan Tatarski Ghetto

Holocaust
http://www.deathcamps.org/lublin/majdanek.html

Research
L
ist of Residents
In the Lublin branch of the Polish State Archives, there is a comprehensive list of the residents of the Majdan Tatarski Ghetto.  A copy exists at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum
http://www.deathcamps.org/occupation/lublin%20ghetto.html


Makolin (Ma,kolin)

Coordinates 5230 2001 is about 2 miles distance away from Bodzanow. "Monkolin" in Polish is written as Ma,kolin. The 'secret' of the confusion is hidden in the letter 'a' with the attached to it 'tail' ('ogonek' in Polish). This diacritic mark pronounces 'a,' as 'on' or sometimes 'om'.
http://www.polishjews.org/places/005.htm 


Makow Mazowieckie (Makow)

Located north of Warsaw.  Prior to WW I, it was known as  Makow and was in the Lomza Guberniya.
An article entitled "The History of Makow Mazowieckie" is at 
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/kershenbaum/makow.htm  

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Mordechai Tzechanover 
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

  Maps

http://www.mapofpoland.net/Makow-Mazowiecki,photos.html

Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id17.html


Maliniec

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig
 


Malogoszcz

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig
 


Markowskie

Located 3 miles north of the Olecko-Suwalki railway line, and a few miles east  of OleckoIt is in the Suwalki district of Poland.  

  Maps

The regional map of 1882 is at 
http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~feefhs/maps/ruse/re-polan.html  


Markuszow (Markuszów)

In 1681, Markuszów Jews were granted  a privilege to build a synagogue and, among many privileges issued for the townsmen by King John III Sobieski in 1686, there were also charters specifically for Jewish residents. Although the existence of a synagogue was documented as late as 1799, the sole fact that at least from 1766 on there was an independent community allows us to think that a synagogue and a Jewish cemetery already existed here at that time. Historical sources from the 18th century  mention the existence of ‘a Jewish town’ and ‘a Jewish market’ that flourished in the south-east part of the town. Like in many other centers, the Jewish population in Markuszów occupied themselves with trade and craft above all.  

From the second half of the 19th century, the number of Jews living in Markuszów increased rapidly. In 1861 the population of Markuszów was 826, including 387 Jews (which made 46% of the overall population) . In 1885, the population of Markuszów increased to 1,256 people, including 672 Jews  (53% of the overall population)
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/city/markuszow/

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Israel Hoffler 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Maydan

Located about 9 km from Kopychintsy and in the 1929 Poland Business Directory, this village had 914 people. 

Research
Jewish names appearing in this town include Sch. Bilgora; Benjamin Buk, L. Buchsbaum 


Mazowiecka

Research
This site is includes the Birth, Marriage and Death records of Nowy Dwor Maz., Radzymin, Serock, Sochocin and ZakroczymThese records are kept in the Nowy Dwor Mazowiecka Branch of the Polish State Archives and not all records are available for all towns and all years

JRI-Poland Database
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl  


Mezricz - Podolski

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Mordechai Lazar
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Miastkowska Bartkowizna

This  was not really a shtetl, but rather a hamlet near shtetl Miasktkowo, located halfway on the road #61 Ostroleka-Lomza.


Miastkowo Poduchowne

Both appear on Poland list of the localities piror to WW II, but are not shown on the modern maps.  Most probably they were both hamlets and have been integrated by Miastkow as it has happened to numerous small localities.


Miechow

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Haim Keren 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Miedzyrzec Podlaski

Located not far from Brest.  The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book
"The
Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 18th Century"
Authored by M. J. Rosman amounted to 1,075

Rafal Pinczuk lives in this town and has offered any information, photos or help you might need about the town and the surrounding area. Email: rafalpinczuk@poczta.onet.pl

Research
The Mezritch Internet Bulletin
http://www.mezritch.org.il/


Mielec

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Zikaron le-Kehillot Mielec"
(Remembering Mielec; The Destruction of the Jewish Community
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Mielnica/Melnitsa Podolskaya

Research
Town Leader is Lee Bothas
t bothasts@earthlink.net
Birth, marriage and death records
have been indexed. 
Marriages
1877-1898
Deaths

1851-1895


Mikashevich

Had a Jewish population of 200 in 1919
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/04.html


Mikulince   

Research
Indexing of records may be available at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/ 


Minsk-Mazowieckie

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Miriam Karmi 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Minsk-Mazovyetsk" 

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 


Mlawa

Holocaust
Mlawa Memorial at Kiriat Shaul cemetery in Tel Aviv. The memorial web page of Mlawa with a lot of material:
http://www.zchor.org/INDMLAWA.HTM

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Moshe Peles

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
Vital research data is held in the Mlawa Archive. 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/ 

Data from one of Mlawa's three LDS films has been added to the JRI-Poland site. 
You will now find indices from Mlawa for the following records and years:
Births
1829, 30,32,34-36,38-40,42-47,66-70,72-74,76-79,81-83,85,87-88,90,91,93,96
Marriages

1822, 23,25,35,36,38-40,42-47,66-70,72-74,76-79, 85,87-88,90,91,93,96
Deaths

1829, 30,32,34-36,38-40,42-47,66-70,72-74,76-79,81-83,85,87-88,90,91,93,96

Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id36.html

Yizkor Book
"Mlawa ha-Yehudit; Koroteha, hitpat Khuta, Kilyona" (Jewish Mlawa; Its history, Development, Destruction
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Mlynow (Mlinov)

Located near Rovno


Morawica

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Mosty Wielkie


Mozyr

In 1919, the Jewish population numbered 11,000

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/04.html


Mstow

Located near Radomsko and east of Czestochowa. 

Cemetery
Daniel Kazez took digital photographs of all of the tombstones in the Jewish cemetery.
 


  Maps


http://www.getamap.net/maps/poland/(pl68)/_mstow/

Research
JRI-Poland has added birth, marriage and death records
For years 1857-58; 1863-69; 1878-84; 1885-95
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psaczestochowa.htm


Myln Wojtostwo

It had a population of 48 before WW II.

http://www.polishjews.org/places/009.htm

http://www.polishjews.org/people.htm


Narajow (Naraiv)

The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book "The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 18th Century" by M. J. Rosman amounted to 286.

Research
Indexing of records are in process and may be available at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/ 


Narewka, Poland

Webmaster Joy Kestenbaum
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/narewka/index.html


Narowla

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel recreated by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display


Nasielsk

Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id18.html

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel recreated by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum. 
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm


Nawarya

Research
Included in the JRI-PL database.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html


Nieswicz (Nisvizh)

Now in Belarus

Synagogue
http://members.core.com/~mikerose/polsynagog.htm


Nisko

Located in the Zaglebie area, is a city near Tarnobrzeg

Holocaust
Jews were murdered here by the Nazis


Novoselycja (Gorishne Zaluchchja)

When under Galicia rule, it was in Sniatyn County (Polish spellings were Nowosielica, Dzurow, and Zalucze nad Czeremoszem = Zalucze on the Czeremosz River).  Novoselycja is just southwest of Dzuriv (about 15 miles southwest of Sniatyn, or about half way to Kosiv), and Dzuriv in turn is 7 or 8 miles west of Zalucze. Before WW II, their population, according to Kubijivich were Novoselycja 1880 (30 Jews), Dzuriv 2,810 (60 Jews), and Zalucze 3,680 (90 Jews)


Novy Sacz

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_sacz1/nowy_sacz1.html


Novy Targ

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Novyye Strelishcha 

Novyye Strelishcha ( the current name of this town, now located in Ukraine)

Research
Records from the 1890s and the 20th century (up to the early part of WW II) are stored at the AGAD Archives Branch of the Polish State  Archives - Warsaw Urzad Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Records Office)  Research requests should be directed to that office  
Births
: 1877-1879, 1890-1894
Deaths: Nil;
Marriages
: 1877-1893.


Nowa Brzeznica

JRI-Poland has added birth, marriage and death records
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psaczestochowa.htm

Maps

http://mapa.nocowanie.pl/nowa_brzeznica/


Nowa Tymienica

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Nowe Miasto Nad Pilica (Neustadt (Yiddish or German for Polish  Nowe Miasto)

Located near Plonsk and some 20 miles from Serock - 30 miles NNW from Warsaw.
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org//poland/nowe-miasto-nad-pilica.html

Contact
For information contact Joe Ross joeross1220@comcast.net

http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2010-02/msg00005.html

http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=cm&g=2

http://www.olenberg.org/sitefram/document.php?id=47

http://www.statemaster.com/encyclopedia/Shtetl 

Photo
http://resources.ushmm.org/inquery/uia_doc.php/photos/9?hr=null


Nowogrodek Province

A searchable database with information are available from this site. 
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/poland/nowogrodskie.jri.htm


Nowogrodek

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Hertzel Bruk
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Nowogrodski Wojewodztwo

The seven districts outlined with descriptions of each town in the districts
http://www.kresy.co.uk/nowogrodskie_towns.html


Nowy Dwor

17 miles NW of Warsaw. JRI-Poland Database website 
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl 

Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id21.html


Nowy Korczyn

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost,
 and dozens of local villages


Nowy Mlyna (Nowego Mlyna, Nowe Mlyny)

This town had a population of only 27 before WW II, but was destroyed by the Nazis.  Nowy Mlyn was not a town, but as its name says, just a mill. It was in the Kielce region. It is located near Wolanow and is listed in the 1929 Poland Business Directory
http://www.polishjews.org/places/006.htm

Research
Nowy Mlyn
is listed in the 1929 Poland Business Directory
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/bizdir/bd1929.htm


Nowy Sacz (Neu Sandez, Neu Sandec, Sants)

nowy_sacz

Digest archives of October 31, 1998 page 11

Debbie Raff offers a Nowy Sacz Group. The purpose of the group is to have a means where those researching Nowy Sacz or adjacent towns can have a forum for discussion,  to ask questions, swap family stories, etc.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sacz/

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Bronfeld  
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Yizkor Books
There are two Yizkor Books for this town founded in 1204 and located in Western Galicia now southern Poland.  The Chassidic dynasty of the Halberstams were from this community, which was small, but very important to Jews in pre-war Galicia and then Poland.   A JewishGen member discusses this shtetl
http://jewisgen.org


Nowy Targ (Jablonka)

Yizkor Book
Yizkor Book pages (in English) of Nowy Targ and vicinity
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Nowy_targ/nowy_targ.html

http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1970


Nowa Tymienica

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 


Odelsk

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel recreated by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum. 
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm


Odrzywol

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya 


Olesko

Included in the JRI-PL database.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html


Olesnica

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig    

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including:  
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages


Oleszyce

Cemetery
There is an old Jewish cemetery

Research
Jewish vital records in the Przemysl Branch of the Polish State Archives include 2,040 Births, 101 Marriages and 1,508 Deaths 
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/    

There are no Mormon microfilms of Jewish vital records for this town. 


Olkusz

There was a Jewish settlement in Olkusz by the time of Casimir the Great (1333–70), who expropriated the gold and silver mines in Olkusz belonging to his Jewish banker Levko.

http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olkusz

Holocaust
Partial List of Those Who Were Deported
http://www.zchor.org/olkusz/deportation.htm

http://www1.yadvashem.org/yv/en/exhibitions/our_collections/olkusz/index.asp

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn,  Olesnica, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0015_0_15080.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.zchor.org/olkusz/olkusz.htm

http://www.zchor.org/olkusz/women.htm


Olszany (Vil'shany in Polish)

Cemetery
http://fiveprime.org/hivemind/Tags/cemetery,olszany

Research
The Polish National Archives in Przemysl has the older records of Olszany. The Registry Office, Urzad Stanu Cywilnego, of Olszany, is located in Krasiczyn, has the newer records.


Olsztynskie, Dabrowno (Gilgenburg)

It was known as Gilgenburg, West Prussia at one time.
http://www.fodz.pl/?d=10&w=14&l=en


 Opatow

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig  

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Eliahu Zilberberg

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages. 

Yizkor Book
"Apt; A Town Which Does Not Exist Anymore"
The English portion (16 pages) can be read on the Opatow Yizkor Book Project page which gives a detailed account of this famous Chassidic town's history and destruction.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/opatow/opatow.html


Opoczno

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya. 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig   
 

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Aharon Karmi 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
BMD Records
(Birth, Marriage and Death) over 3,440 translated BMD records covering 1826-1847 and more than 2420 BMD translated records from Konskie covering 1826-1845 (some to 1887, but are written in Polish or Russian) are available online, in the Jewish Record Indexing (JRI) - Poland Website: 
http://www.jewishgen.org 
 

Yizkor Book


Opole-Lubelski

An offer to do a lookup for individual marriages has been made by dprice@sympatico.ca on a "if free time available" basis. 

Research
Database
, in German at
www.doew.at

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Opole-Lubelski" 
(Memorial Book of Opole-Lubelski Poland)  
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor 

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Orla

Although the Jewish community of Orla has a long and rich history and used to be one of the important Jewish centres in Eastern Poland, an Orla Yizkor Book (Memorial Book) has never been written.

Until 1939 about 1500 Jews lived in the town. The vast majority were killed in the Treblinka concentration camp. Some of them were drafted in 1940 into the Soviet army or were deported to Siberia and this saved their lives. After 1945 not one Jew lived in Orla. Those who survived the Holocaust emigrated mainly to Israel, the US, Australia and South Africa. Unfortunately, emigrants from Orla, scattered around the world, did not form any organization. Their communities were probably too small (even including pre-war emigration) and too dispersed. This is the most likely explanation why an Orla Yizkor Book has never been written.

Seventy years after the annihilation of the Jewish Orla community, we decided to try to create an Orla Yizkor Book. We are of course aware that only very few Orla Jews are still alive. We were able to contact two of them and received their memoirs. But we believe that it is still possible to contact their descendants who might have some testimonies or know a family history. Again, we are lucky to have already received some of these documents. We hope to contact more descendants in the future to hear and read their stories.

We would like the voices of Jews who lived in Orla to be heard. This is the general aim of the project. Our concept is to collect all possible memoirs written by Orla's Jews and family stories told by their descendants. Also, Orla's testimonies from Yad Vashem and the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw will be
included. All those materials will form the first part of the Yizkor Book.

The second chapter of the planned publication will be the story about Jewish Orla told by Christians living in Orla. During 2010 and 2011 we interviewed twenty people in Orla who were born before 1930 and remember their Jewish neighbors. We received very valuable and detailed testimonies about Jewish life in Orla. The aim is to interview all people from the oldest generation of Orla residents, about another twenty people.

The Orla Yizkor Book will also include a chapter about the history of the Jewish community of the town. This still requires further research, especially into the period between the beginning of the 1800s and 1939. To fill this gap we will conduct research in the Polish and foreign archives.

The Orla Yizkor Book Project is open for contributions. If you would like to contribute to it please contact the
coordinator and editor, Wojciech Kono @ #324; czuk (wojtekk7@wp.pl). We would very much appreciate any memoirs or testimonies of Orla's Jews, historical documents, old photos and images and family stories. You can help to preserve the legacy of Orla's Jewish community.

In November the biggest Polish weekly "Polityka" published an article about how nowadays residents of Orla remember their Jewish neighbors and how they restore the memory about Jewish Orla. Our Yizkor Book project is also mentioned there.
From a posting by Eli Rabinowitz eli@elirab.com Link to the article (in Polish):
http://tinyurl.com/bpy8wy2 

http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Agriculture

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/orla.html

Synagogue
http://jewish-heritage-travel.blogspot.com/2009/01/poland-orla-synagogue-fund.html

http://samgrubersjewishartmonuments.blogspot.com/2009/01/poland-short-film-on-orla-synagogue.html


Ortelsburg

Once located in East Prussia but is now in Poland

http://www.missing-identity.net/children-profiles/76-lutz-schneider-szczytno-poland-ortelsburg-germany.html

http://www.genealogienetz.de/reg/OPRU/oprus.html

http://felsztyn.tripod.com/germaninvasion/id7.html


Oshmiany
District Towns

Akniste (Oknista): Antaliepte: Braslav: Dubinovo: Dusetos (Dusiat, Dusiaty): Kamajai (Komai)Dvetkai: Obeliai (Abel, Abeli): Onuskis (Oniskis), Anishuk, Ganushishki): Pandelys (Ponidel, Ponedeli): Panemunelis: Papyle: Redutka: Rimse (Rimshany): Rokiskis (Rakishok, Rakishki): Salakas (Soloki): Skapiskis (Skopishok, Skopishki): Slobodka: Suvainiskis (Suvinishok, Suveinishki): Taurangnai (Targin, Tavroginy): Vidziai (Vidzi): Yeziory: Zarasai (Novo-Aleksandrovsk)


Osiek

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig
 


Osspakow  (in Russian: Belostok)

One of the principal Russian Polish Jewish centers, incorporated into Russia between 1807. It appears that the Polish State Archives only has Jewish birth records for the years 1886-1940.


Ostroleka (Ostrolenka)

Located 60 miles NE of Warsaw in Mazowieckie (former Volvodeship

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Yehuda Chamiel

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Yizkor Book
 "Sefer Kehillot Ostrolenka" (Book of Kehillot Ostrolenka) 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 


Ostrow Lubelskie

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Moshe Fishman

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Ostrow-Mazowiecka  (Ostrow)

Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id28.html

Yizkor Book
"
Sefer ha-Zikaron le-Kehillot Ostrov-Mazovyetsk"
(Memorial Book of the community  of Ostrow-Mazowiecka) 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 

http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=2511

http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=2512


Ostrowce

http://www.zchor.org/hitachdut.htm

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Avraham Fridental
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

http://www.maplandia.com/poland/swietokrzyskie/busko-zdroj/ostrowce/

http://www.forumjar.com/forums/Ostrowce


Ostrowikec (Ostrowiec-Swiet., Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages

Yizkor Book
"A Town Between Two Rivers"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html  

The Memorial (Yizkor) Book at this "moving" site 
http://www.kampel.com/memorial/yzkor/ostrowiec/index.htm   


Oswiecim (Oswiecem, Auschwitz)

This infamous town was, before WW II, a predominantly Jewish town until it became 'the hell that it was as Auschwitz.'  

Cemetery
There remains a Jewish cemetery in Oswiecim (Auschwitz/Ushptzin).  Although the cemetery itself was virtually destroyed during the War, many (about 800) of the stones survived and have been re-erected (although not presumably in their original locations).  In 2000, the last Jew living in Auschwitz, Shimshon Klueger, died.  He had lived as a recluse in a hovel and he was, at one time a member of the Belzer Hasidic sect.

In 1997 the Jewish Community in the nearby town of Bielsko-Biala took over responsibility for the cemetery, and decided to compile an inventory of the stones.  This task was delegated to Jacek Proszyk, a Warsaw University student who had previously carried out similar work in the cemeteries of Bielsko-Biala (Bielitz, Biala) itself, Zywiec (Saybusch), Milowka, Skoczow (Skotschau), Cieszyn (Teschen) and Ustron.  Anyone wishing to find out more about the cemetery in Oswiecim, or other cemeteries mentioned can contact Jacek Proszyk  
Email: ariel@pik-net.pl

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Mordechai Frey 
http://pipl.com/directory/name/Beker/300

Synagogues
Currently. There is a synagogue located in a building once used by a small group of worshippers, the Chevra Lomdei Mishnayot (the Society for the Study of the Mishna). The structure had to be extensively renovated, but at least - unlike many more impressive synagogues in Oswiecim - it survived the war because the Germans used it as an ammunition storehouse.  

Yizkor Book
 
"
Sefer Oshpitsin" (Oswiecim; Auschwitz Memorial Book) 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Otwock Kolo Warszawy

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Otwock_Jews_-_September_19,_1942.jpg

Holocaust
http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/ghettos/otwock.html

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Arie Lederman
http://www.genealogy.org.il/links.htm

Research
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jhi/aliyah-passport_surn.htm


Ozarow

Located in southeast Poland, eighty km from Kielce.  The town was in Opatow Powiat of Radom Guberniya of the Kingdom of Poland in the Russian Empire before WWI.   It is now a town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Cemetery

About one hundred monuments remain in the 2.5 acre plot of the Jewish cemetery which dates back nearly four hundred years.

Cemetery Restoration Project
http://www.ozarow.org/

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages


Ozorkow

Located 20 miles (32 km) NW of Lodz and had a large Jewish population before the Shoah.  Some of the towns located close by are: Lodz, Aleksandrow, Lodzki, Piatek, Zgierz, Leczyca, Kutno, Strykow. 

Research
There are indices available including
Marriages
: 1844-55, 1888-1889;
Deaths
: 1887 - 90, 1897 - 1902 
Surnames found in the Ozorkow indices are available
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/ozorkow_surn.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/psa/psastat.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/town/ozorkow.htm

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/statistics.htm

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.


Pabianice

Holocaust
http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_oi.php?ModuleId=10005143&MediaId=272

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Dr. Lipshitz 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Pacanow

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig   

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages


Pakosc

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.


Palesnica

Located in the Krakow region, Brzesko district.


Parczew

http://www.diapozytyw.pl/en/site/slady_i_judaica/parczew

http://www.nizkor.org/hweb/places/poland/ostrow/ostrow-02.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/town/parczew.htm


Peczenizin

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel built by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum. 
http://zchor.org/verbin\verbin.htm


Peremysl   (Peremyshl' in Ukraine, Prymsl)

A city that is now in Poland and located very near the border with Ukraine.


Petrik

Jewish population of 2,200

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/04.html


Piatek

There is a Piatek Surname List on-line at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL  


click on "Polish State Archives" then on "Status Reports: PSA Projects Underway" then scroll down to Leczyca Branch and click on the town name 'Piatek' 

Research
The indexing of the 2002 births, marriages and deaths recorded 1842 through 1867 is now completed.  The Piatek database now indexes 4,355 births, marriages and deaths, for the years 1842 through 1899.  Other nearby towns  include Zychlin, Kutno, Bielawy, and Brzezin 


Piatnica (Poinitze)

Across the river, on the east bank of the Narew River, from Lodz and it is one mile east of Lomza.

Research
1826-1877
These records were microfilmed by the LDS (Mormons) and were indexed by volunteers under the Lodz "Shtetl CO-OP."

1878-1898
The first Lodz PSA project was for the years 1878 to 1898 and that data has been online for many years.

1899-1905
The "Seven-Year Initiative" to index 43,501 Lodz birth, marriage and death records was launched in 2001 and all the 1899 to 1905 records were computerized by the JRI-Poland team in Warsaw. This data was entered in the original Cyrillic and automatically converted to Polish spelling (Latin characters). The indices from 1899 to 1901 have been added to the JRI-Poland database and can be searched on-line.

Although completed, the indices from 1902 to 1905 cannot be added to the on-line database yet.

For those of you not familiar with the background, in 1997 JRI-Poland entered into an agreement with the Polish State Archives to index Jewish vital records *not* microfilmed by the Mormons (LDS). Each year the Lodz USC ("Urzad Stanu Cywilnego" - civil registration office) transfers the eligible (100-year-old) registers to the Lodz Branch of the Polish State Archives. The records then became available to JRI-Poland for indexing.

The 1902-1905
data will enable you to further expand your research of the time period when not only our grandparents and their siblings were born and married, but also when many of our parents, aunts and uncles were born in Lodz. We hope the 26,735 birth, marriage and death records in these four years will result in breakthroughs in your family research!

A list of all surnames found in the new data (
1899-1905) online at:
http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/lodz2_surn.htm

More about the 1899 - 1905 "Lodz Seven-Year Initiative:"

Because of the vast quantity of surviving Jewish vital records for Lodz and the large number of records that become available for indexing each year, the Seven-Year Initiative was created. The advantage of this approach to you, the researcher, was that you were asked to participate in only one project covering these seven years, rather than a new one each year.

The Lodz Jewish vital records for these years are:
Year Entries
1899: 4,951
1900: 5,944
1901: 5,890
1902: 6,952
1903: 6,405
1904: 7,290
1905: 6,088

Updates on the Lodz Seven-Year Initiative will be posted to the JRI-Poland/PSA project status webpage at:
http://www.jri-poland.org/psa/status.htm 


Pierzchnica

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig


Pilica

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig
 


Pilov (Pulawy)

Located on the River Vistula (Vaysl in Yiddish) between Deblin (Modzhits) and Kazimierz (Kuzmir).


Pinczow

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig  

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Polaniec, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages

Synagogue
There is a still standing synagogue in this village.


Pinsk - Karlin

Dorshei Tov Anshei Pinsk Later changed to Ezras Achim Bnei Pinsk From a posting by Jerry Seligsohn jselig3460@aol.com

Cemetery
Now only a fenced-off area.  See Belarus Law above.

History
Pinsk
- a well done history of The Jewish Community of Pinsk in English
http://www.pinskjew.com

Landsmanshaftn Name Lists
Scroll down on the right until you come to "Pinsk Organizations", and click on it.
www.jewishgen.org/belarus

Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Nachum Bone 
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74 

"This is the third Pinsk Landsmanshaft listed on the Belarus website. The first was a benevolent society, the second a group of fur workers, and the latest a Workman's Circle. This should give those interested in the Pinsk area a wider perspective of Pinskers in America. I have not limited this message to the Belarus website because Pinsk is as much associated with Poland as with its present eastern roots. We often see correspondents seeking their roots in Pinsk. I wonder if they consult the Pinsk Landsmanshaft name lists found on the Belarus website. Particularly useful on this latest name list is the date that the member joined the Circle. Some names joined before 1905 which might place their date of birth in the 1870's. I would suggest that all who joined prior to 1925 could be cross checked on the Ellis Island database. You already have Pinsk as the city of origin."  From a posting by Jerome Seligsohn

Synagogue 
http://members.tripod.com/~mikerosenzweig/polsynagog.htm


Piotrkowice

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig  

Yizkor Book
http://www.zchor.org/hitachdut/pinkas7.htm


Piotrkow Trybunalski

Located 42 kilometers (26 miles south-southeast) of Lodz.  It is perched upon the Odra River and the veritable maze of islands and bridges that make up the city have gained it the title of the "Venice of Poland". It was an important Jewish cultural, religious and Hebrew publishing center in pre-war Poland. There were three weekly Yiddish newspapers and numerous Jewish organizations and institutions. When it was still part of Germany, the Jewish community boasted around 20,000 persons; it had the second largest synagogue in the country.

Cemetery
There is an 18th century cemetery with over 3000 tombstones and there is also a synagogue.

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Izhak Goldfried 
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
Jewish vital records indexing, that are housed in the Piotrkow branch of the Polish State Archives, are being reviewed. Contact Marla Daschko waltman@fox.nstn.ca  

ShtetLinks
There is a ShtetLinks site commemorating this Jewish community at 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/piotrkowtryb/

Yizkor Book
"History of the Jews in the Bukowina," ("Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina,") 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html 


Plawno

Cemetery
Daniel Kazez has many, many hundreds of photographs of the tombstones in the cemetery.

 Maps

Research
JRI-Poland has added birth, marriage and death records for year: 1890
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psaczestochowa.htm


Plock (Plotzk Russian spelling)

The Jewish community can be traced back to the 13th century according to the Encyclopedia Judaica.  The Gorod (city) of Plotzk was located in the Uyezd (county) of  Plotzk in the Guberniya (State) of Plotzk and was about 40 miles from Rypin. Plock with Kalisz and Poznan are considered to be the most ancient communities in Poland. There is evidence of Jewish existence in Plock already in 1237.

Plock Remembrance Initiative
http://www.zchor.org/INDPLOCK.HTM


Letter to a young boy from Plock, Poland - read this letter from Ada Holtzman
http://www.zchor.org/taub/taub.htm

http://www.zchor.org/zlotnik.html


Books
    

Dr. Jan Przedpelski authored a book about the history and martyrology of the Jews of Plock.

"History Of the Jews in Plotzk until the First World War (1237 - 1914)"
http://www.zchor.org/plock/sefer1.htm

"Lexicon Of Biographies of Personalities, Public Persons, Rabbis, Writers, Artists, Educators, Teachers, Leaders, Public Activists, Party and Other Organizations Activists,  Sport Leaders etc."

and to Yad Vashem archives as well. It is my hope that this book will serve as commemoration to the Jewish ancient grand and holy community of Plock, exterminated by the Germans during the Holocaust. From a posting by Ada Holtzman on JewishGen
www.zchor.org

http://www.zchor.org/plockbio.htm


Community
Associations Of Plotzk Jews All Over the World
http://www.zchor.org/plock/sefer7.htm

Community institutions, Social Work, Economic Life, Neighborhood Relations
http://www.zchor.org/plock/sefer2a.htm

The Plotzk Jewish Community between the Two World Wars 1918-1939
http://www.zchor.org/plock/sefer2.htm

Holocaust
A  cruel  deportation already in February 1941 destroyed this grand community, 10,000 souls were murdered by the Germans, most of them in Treblinka."
http://www.zchor.org/plock/sefer5.htm

Images Of the Past
http://www.zchor.org/plock/sefer10.htm

Landsmanshaft
"The Plock Landsmanshaft in Israel and me donated the material also to JewishGen Yizkor Books database
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/plock/Plock.html


Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Yochewet Brown
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
JRI-Poland Database
website
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl 

Plotzk-Born Jewish Painters
http://www.zchor.org/plock/sefer3.htm

Political Parties, Youth Movements, Zionist Funds
http://www.zchor.org/plock/sefer2b.htm

Post War Efforts Of Rebuilding
http://www.zchor.org/plock/sefer6.htm


Yizkor Book
"Plotzk; Toldot Kehila Atikat Yomin Be-Polin"
(Plotzk; A History of an Ancient Jewish Community in Poland) 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 

Yizkor - the Martyrs Names (Necrology)
http://www.zchor.org/plock/ploremem.htm

"I have posted the entire English part of the Plock Yizkor Book, " PLOTZK (PLOCK) A History of an Ancient Jewish Community in Poland", editor Eliahu Eisenberg, Plotzker Association in Israel, Tel Aviv 1967."

"The English part is not a complete translation of the Yizkor book of Plock but rather a synopsis, summary, and should be treated as such. There are 684 pages in Hebrew and Yiddish but only 96 pages in English. I have translated and added the titles and page numbers of articles which do not appear in the English summary. I added the code "H" if article is in Hebrew, or "Y" if in Yiddish."  I have added also the sub-chapters to the various articles, which are not included in the original Table Of Contents. On many occasions I have added from the Hebrew and Yiddish parts of the book  also names of people mentioned in the articles, when that was possible, mainly in the Holocaust chapters."

"I have also added the names of people who appear in the photographs to the captions in English which did not include these names. My hope is to scan and add the 270 photographs to the memorial web site." The book is accessed from the main P.R.I. (Plock Remembrance Initiative) web page, at:
http://www.zchor.org/INDPLOCK.HTM

Plock gubernia originated surnames
http://www.jewishgenealogy.com.ar/plock/ancestors_a.html


Plawno/Gidle

Located near Radomsko and Czestochowa

Cemetery
Daniel Kazez took digital photographs of some of the tombstones in the Jewish cemetery. 


Plonch

Cemetery Restoration
http://www.pjcrp.org/


Plonsk

Research
Virtually all vital records have survived.  Registers for the years 1895 to 1940 are available at the Civil Records Office (Urzad Stanu Cywilnego) of the town and extracts (not copies) may be obtained by writing to that office. 
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/polandv.html 

Researchers interested in Plonsk, and other towns in the vicinity of Sochocinshould try searching for family names in the Sochocin indices at  
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Plonsk ve-ha-Seviva"
Memorial Book of Plonsk and vicinity 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html 


Plonna (Polonna)

Located about 20 km. SW of Sanok

  Maps

A map of the area at
http://lemko.org/maps100/Pages/Pg76.html 

Research
Vital records may be available in either or both the Polish National Archives in Przemysl and/or in the Registry Office for Plonna in Bukowsko.  The Registry Office, called Urzad Stanu Cywilnego, would have the more recent records. 


Podkamien Pidkamin

See Ukraine Shtetls page for information and links


Podgorze

A district of Crakow (Krakow) and located on the other side of the Vistula river, opposite to the Jewish district of Kazimierz.  Before 1918, it was a separate city known also as Josefstadt by the Austrians

Holocaust
During WWW II, the ghetto was located in Podgorze, the concentration camp in Plaszow - only a mile away


Podhajce (Podgavtsy)

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland indexed records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów,  Tarnopol and Stanisiawow.  Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. 

Cemetery
The New York Podhajcer Society has cemetery records for this shtetl. It was once in Galicia, and now it is known as Podgaytsy, Ukraine

Research
Births and Marriage records are available at AGAD at  
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

Deaths
1896, 1898, 1899
Deaths: (Index Only)
1879-1882, 1884, 1887, 1893-1895

Index Only entries
are extracted from indices and the underlying records are not available and cannot be ordered from AGAD.

Travel
Report on Jean Rosenbaum's visit to this town in 2001
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Podhajce/jean/jean-podhajce.html

Yizkor Book for this shtetl
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol2_00410.html 


Podvolochisk - (Podwolochisk)

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/podvolochisk/podvolochisk.html


Podwoloczyska (Podwolczisk)

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Dov Brayer 
http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
Indexing of records available at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/  
 


Pohrabyszcze

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel built by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum


Polaniec (Plontsh)

  

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya.   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig  

Plontsher  Descendants Society:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Plontch_Descendants/

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Radkow, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.


Pomoryany (Pomorzany, Pomarin)

Located SE of L'viv and W of Tarnopol.  It is 11 miles South of Zolochev in the L'viv oblastIn 1931, there were 4,304 people located on the Zolotaya Lipa River


Poniatowa

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/poniatowa.html

Holocaust
The
hideous Forced Labor Camp, where part of the remnants of the  Warsaw  Ghetto  was deported to.  The incredible and forgotten fact about this camp is that also there, under impossible conditions, the prisoners organized an underground and resisted the Nazis in the final liquidation of the camp. 60 years later and in the outskirts of the peaceful town In Poniatowa stands 6 memorials to commemorate what happened there in WW II.  No mention of a the Jews on neither of the monuments. 
http://www.zchor.org/poniatowa/poniatowa.htm

On November 4, 1943, the Germans began destroying Poniatowa Forced Labor Camp: some 15000 Jews were shot to death in a one-day massacre as part of operation "ERNTEFEST". Prisoners who resisted were burnt alive inside their barracks. Only a few survivors escaped the camp before it was totally liquidated. Poniatowa was the Forced Labor Camp with the last prisoners of Ghetto Warsaw and Ghetto Opole.  Commemorate Poniatowa:
http://www.zchor.org/poniatowa/poniatowa.htm

The most important resource is the testimony of Ludwika Fiszer at:
http://www.zchor.org/poniatowa/fiszer.htm


Poreba Koceby

Yizkor Book
http://www.zchor.org/bialystok.html


Poreba Srednia

Yizkor Book
http://www.zchor.org/kehilot/pinkas4.htm


Posen   (Province of)  

Poznan was known as Posen and part of the German province of Silesia though this is not quite true.  Katowitz, Oppein and Breslau belonged to Silesia, Poznan -- not.  It was (and still is) one of the greatest city of Wielkopolska region.  Poznan was a part of Poland again in November 1918.

A list showing most of the hundreds of town name changes from German to Polish 19th century Posen Province.
http://www.posen-l.com/main_towns.html?PHPSESSID=d3d551f6a0ff6938e68940bcfbfb7dba

During the 19th century, the Prussian province of Posen was called Wielkopolska until 1793. It meant "Greater Poland".   This area was the historical center of origin of the Polish Nation in the 10th century and has always been one of the richest and most developed provinces of Poland.  From the Second Partition (1793) until the end of WWI (1919), this part of the world was a Prussian province, except for the decade in the early 1800s when Napoleon was in control. More information 
http://www.polishroots.com/genpoland/pos.htm 

In 1836, a list was published of  "The Naturalized Jews of the Grand Duchy of Posen 1834-35".  Edward David Luft authored a book in 1987 that included the list, more than 5,000 persons, with additional commentary and maps.  More information is available at 
http://www.avotaynu.com/books/posen.htm

The Jewish population of Posen was almost depleted by emigration even before the area became part of Poland after WW I.  This explains the lack of a Yizkor book.

Steven Fischbach has compiled an InfoFiles for Jewish genealogists with ancestors in Posen; it is in the JewishGen InfoFiles and contains background references.


Books
   

Death Books 1831-1835, Posen
http://members.aol.com/rechtman/index.html

Heppner & Herzberg wrote a 2-volume book on the
"History of Jews in Posen"
but it is long out of print and printed in German.  Volume 2 has a history for each of the 131 communities of Posen that had Jewish community.  Volume 1 is easy to obtain by Interlibrary loan, but Volume 2 may be found at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign in the US.

"Jews in the Province of Posen"
Authored by Michael Zarchin is also out of print, but may be available in used book shops or on the Internet. 
www.Amazon.com  


Research
Check out Ruben Frankenstein's web site where you will find a translation of a 1909 German article on Jewish emigration from Posen. 
http://members.nbci.com/newhoir/index.html  


Posen-L list

http://www.posen-l.com/


Powazki

A small village that was incorporate in 1916 into Warsaw.  A register was found according to an article published in the Revue du Cercle de Genealogie Juive, the publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France, Issue 109, Spring 2012
http://www.freag.net/en/t/4egnw/revue_du_cercle

http://www.freag.net/en/t/3g0w4/revue_du_cercle


Poznan

http://www.pharao.com/cam/Europe/Poland/?Blaszki/transportation.html 

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Hersh Kronenberg 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Praga

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Praga; Mukdash le zeykher Kedoshei Irenu"

(Praga Book; Dedicated to the Memory of the Martyrs of Our Town) 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 


Praszka


 


  Maps

Research
JRI-Poland has added birth, marriage and death records for years 1868; 1871-96. For information contact Joe Ross
joeross1220@comcast.net
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psaczestochowa.htm


Prasznic (Przasnysz)

Jews appeared in Przasnysz in the 16th century and emerged as an organized community over the 18th century. The late 1880s saw the Kehilla reach its peak, with the number of its members at 4,500 (52% of the town’s population)
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/de/city/przasnysz/

Registrations of births and marriages from 1832 to 1866 are available as is a Surname List
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id23.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/surnames/przasnys.htm

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Dina Rot 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Personal Travel Site
http://ginnyinvienna.blogspot.com/2010/05/visit-to-przasnysz-april-28-2010.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przasnysz/przasnysz.html


Promnik

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  


Proszowice

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya  


Pruchnik - (see Galicia )


Prudnik

Holocaust
Concentration Camp Listings including Prudnik
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/cclist.html

http://www.jewishtravel.pl/


Przasnysz

Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id23.html

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Zikaron Kehillot Proshnits"

(Memorial Book to the Community of Proshnitz)  The Table of Contents, pictures, documents and necrology are available
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html 

http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=2531


Przedborz

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya which had a Jewish presence

Cemetery
Jeff Donsky's Przedborz, Poland 1988 trip including photos of the Jewish Cemetery 
http://www.jewishgen.org/kraig

Research
Extracts of all Jewish marriages from 1810 to 1846, transcribed from Polish Records have been translated from 1871 to 1875
www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl  


http://www.bfcollection.net/cities/poland/przedborz/przedborz.html

Synagogue
This town had a wooden synagogue that was destroyed by the Nazis.  A wooden model is on display at Kibbutz Yakum Israel built by Moshe Verbin and another part of the display is at Beth Ha'tefutsorth Museum.  
http://www.zchor.org/verbin/verbin.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00206.html


Przemysl

  

http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/ghettos/przemysl.html

Before WW I, Galicia was part of Austria and several partitions occurred in the 1700s and 1800s.  It is 310 miles ENE of Vienna 

Archives
Przemysl Main Archives  (in Polish) 
http://www.workjoy.com.pl/pmap_gos/archiwum/archiwum.html 

The archive address is 
Urzad Miasta i Gminy w Prudniku, 
ul. T. Kosciuszki 3, 
48-200 Prudnik, Poland

Blog
The
Jewish Przemysl Blog
http://przemysl.blogspot.com/2007/12/przemyslers-ball-update.html

Holocaust
On the morning of July 26, 1942, at the bridge over the river San in Przemysl, a detachment of SS and police wanted to round up Jews from the ghetto for deportation to the Belzec extermination camp.  Two German army officers, the town commander Major Liedtke and his deputy, First Lieutenant Battel, protected the Jews from being taken to their death by threatening to order their men to open fire unless the SS men retreated.  

Only one day before the bridge encounter, Battel had used army trucks to take Jewish workers and their families - 80 to 100 people - out of the ghetto and house them under direct military supervision.  Both Battel and Liedtke have been honored in 1982 and 1993 by Yad Vashem, Israel as "Righteous among the Nations"

1906-1965 First Przemysler Sick Benefit Society

http://digital.cjh.org/R/H2CGIITD4B8A196MQPM1I7XN8RVKSIQVEXY6K93UXD2PB828SU-01931?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=1307020&local_base=GEN01&pds_handle=GUEST

Landsmanshaftn Societies Cemeteries in New York
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Przemysl/cemeteryny.shtml

Research
Roberta Jainchill rivkalcj@aol.com is the Archive Coordinator for the Jewish Records Indexing-Poland project to index the vital records in the Przemysl Archives.  Barbara U. Yeager is the Przemysl Networking Group Coordinator png42@hotmail.com
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/przemysl

Jewish vital records in the Przemysl Branch of the Polish State Archives include 6,104 Births, 1,244 Marriages and 17,864 Deaths 
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/    

There are no Mormon microfilms of Jewish vital records for this town.

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Przemysl" "Sefer Przemysl" (Przemysl Memorial Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Przerosl

Cemetery
Przerosl Jewish Cemetery Restoration

http://www.przerosl.com/


Przyrow

Research
Located east of Czestochowa. Birth, Marriage and Death records for the years: 1889-95
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/psa/psaczestochowa.htm

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-524309


Przytyk  (Pshitik)

Mapa okolic Przytyku z 1938 roku z zaznaczonym cmentarzem żydowskim
http://www.kirkuty.xip.pl/przytyk.htm

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya. It served as the administrative center for Bialobrzegi until 1926.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0016_0_16158.html
  
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig 

Cemeteries
http://www.galiciantraces.com/shtetl.htm

www.kirkuty.xip.pl 

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/przytyk.html

The word pshitik refers to the township of Przytyk in the district of Radom, Poland.


Map

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/city/przytyk/

Pogrom
On 9 March 1936, there was a pogrom in the township but it met Jewish resistance. There were casualties on both sides but the Polish court found the Jews guilty of starting the so-called trouble. The one sided system of Polish justice was highly supported by the Polish government and became its declared policy towards the Jewish minority. The atmosphere created by the trial spread throughout Poland and was referred to as the “przytyk atmosphere.”  From a posting by Ron Doctor

http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Przytyk_Pogrom

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Przytyk/Przytyk.html


Przysucha

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya   located about 25 km from Radom   
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig
  
http://www.cs.appstate.edu/~sjg/jewishgen.htm


Pulawy

Located in Lublin Guberniya and was a center for culture and Jewish social movements at the beginning of the 20th century. 

Yizkor Book
"Yizkor-Bukh Pulawy"
(Memorial Book Pulawy) also known as Novaya Aleksandriya, Pilev, Pilov, and Pulav before.  The book is 496 pages and written in Yiddish, with a Necrology and lots of photos, testimonies of survivors and the story of the town for about 50 years before 1939 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html  

A fund raising project has been initiated to translate the Yizkor Book for this shtetl 
http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html


Pultusk

archivesoutsidepultuskarchives2.jpg
Pultusk Archives

Pultusk is located 37 miles (60 km) north of Warsaw and is in the Mazovia area.

Cemetery
Twenty tombstones are in the Museum Pultusk; one tombstone is in the estate at Soneczna 40 st.; five tombstones are in Archiwum in Pultusk.  According to the moderator of the Pultusk group, there are no headstones left at the site of the cemetery.

Photos
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id13.html

http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id15.html

Personal Stories
http://www.movinghere.org.uk/stories/story39/story39.htm

http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/online/phistories/phi_hiding_discovery_uu.htm

http://www.stephenjdubner.com/journalism/033196.html

Pultusk Area Interest Group
Contact Stephen Bernstein at SBernst579@aol.com   The group has the mailing address and the manager of the museum's name

"The Pultusker Progressive Souvenir Journal"
"The Pultusker Progressive Souvenir Journal"  was published for the Tenth Jubilee of Pultusker Progressive Society Sunday, May Fifteenth, 1927
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id34.html

Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id4.html

Yizkor Book
"Pultusk; Sefer  Zikaron" (Pultusk Memorial Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Raczki

Located near Augustow
http://www.jewishgen.org/SuwalkLomza/LandsmenPlaces.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/SuwalkLomza/


Radish

There were 30 homes in 1919 that housed Jews
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/04.html


Radom


Radom Ghetto
http://www.deathcamps.org/occupation/radom%20ghetto.html

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig  

The word pshitik refers to the township of Przytyk in the district of Radom, Poland. On 9 March 1936, there was a pogrom in the township but it met Jewish resistance. There were casualties on both sides but the Polish court found the Jews guilty of starting the so-called trouble. The one sided system of Polish justice was highly supported by the Polish government and became its declared policy towards the Jewish minority. The atmosphere created by the trial spread throughout Poland and was referred to as the “przytyk atmosphere.”

A wonderful and informative site that includes:
Radomsko (Noworadomsk/Novoradomsk/Radomsk) and nearby:
Gidle
Kruszyna
Nowa Brzeznica
Plawno
Rozprza

Holocaust
1940-42: All of Radom's Jews were forced to live in one of two ghettos established by the Germans in April 1941. Hannah and Jozef moved in with Itzik, their son, who was living in a shack with his own and another family. Itzik supported them by making clothes for the Germans and smuggling food into the ghetto. In August the Germans began liquidating Radom's two ghettos. On the night of August 17, 1942, Hannah and her husband were rounded up, marched to the railroad, and herded into a boxcar
http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/idcard.php?ModuleId=10006761

Jews taken from Radom to the labour camp at Cieszanow

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Chaim Kintzler 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
The Radom Ghetto in Poland was liquidated on August 16-18; 18,000 Jews were deported to Treblinka; 1,500 who resisted deportation were shot on the spot; 4,000 Jews were put into a special slave labor ghetto.

Complete extracts of all Jewish births in this city from 1810 - 1825.  Encompasses some neighboring villages.
radom.htm

Travel
"A Journey to Radom"
A travelogue of a visit to an ancestral home town by Marc Weinman

http://jgsla.org/publications/roots-key/roots-key-1998

Radom Gubernia originated surnames
http://www.jewishgenealogy.com.ar/radom/ancestors_a.html


Radomsko

Located between Lodz and Czestochowa in Piotrkow Province and very close to PlawnoThis is not the same town as Radom.  Alternative old names for this town include: Naya Radomsk; Novo Radomsk; Novo Radomsko; Radomsk.  Nowy, Novy or Novyj is the Slavic word for "new" and often the word is written separately from the neighbor word.
http://www.crarg.org


Books
 

"History of the Jews in the Bukowina,"
("Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina,")
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html 

"Rozklad Na Parafian Wyznania Mojzeszowego na utrzymanie Buznicy w Miescie Radomsku na lata 1829/31 ulozony" Means "Distribution of support for maintenance of the synagogue in the City of Radomsko by parishioners of the Jewish Faith for the years 1829/1831"  The columns indicate names, professions and amounts.  Dan Kazez has a copy of this document 


Holocaust
On October 9, 1942, SS troops in the town deported 10,000 Jews to Treblinka
http://edwardvictor.com/Ghettos/2006/Radomsko.htm


  Maps

http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL  

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Chaya Ash 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
Jewish vital records indexing, that are housed in the Piotrkow branch of the Polish State Archives, are being reviewed.
http://www.mapofpoland.net/Radomsko,photos.html

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Yizkor le-Kehillot Radomsk ve-ha-Seviva"
(Memorial Book of the Community of Radomsk and Vicinity)Gloria Berkenstat Freund is currently translating the Yiddish sections and portions have begun to appear on the JewishGen Yizkor Book site.
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html  


Radomysl

Located 116 miles S S East of Warsaw 
http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~feefhs/maps/ah/ah-galic.html


Radoshytsi (Radoszyce)

There were 30 Jews living in this 186 numbered homes in the 1944 - 46 period.  The village actually number 985 individuals prior to WWII 


Radoszyce

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya 
http://www.jewishgen.org/krsig

Research
Jewish Records Indexing has updated indexes from the LDS Microfilms.


Radowaz

Located near Tarnobrzeg


Radymno (Radimno, Redem)

It was once a part of Western Galicia, but now Poland in the Jaroslaw Administrative District.  It is 11.7 miles north of Przemysl and 8.2 miles SE of Jaroslaw. Radymno (Radimno, Redem) - was once a part of Western Galicia, but now Poland  

Research
Jewish vital records in the Przemysl Branch of the Polish State Archives include 73 Births, 0 Marriages and 39 Deaths 
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/   

There are no Mormon microfilms of Jewish vital records for this town


Radzilow

Located in the former Lomza Guberniya on the northeastern border of Poland.  There is an excellent web site that describes and gives an insight into Shtetl Life.  The webmaster is Jose Gutstein JMG-Miami@msn.com 
http://www.radzilow.com/  

Holocaust
A mass murder of Jews took place on July 7, 1941 by German sponsored members of the local Citizens' Guard.  More information is available at
http://radzilow.com/tygodnik.htm

'Rzeczpospolita'
A major Polish newspaper. Jose Gutstein JMG-Miami@email.msn.com has translated an article written by Andrzej Kaczynski, dealing with the events of the Holocaust in Jedwabne and Radzilow, in Lomza Guberniya.


Radzymin

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Mordechai Zilberstein 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


  Map

http://www.mapquest.com/cgi-bin/mqfreeconnect?width=500&height=300&level=5&lat=51783

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Zikaron le-Kehillot Radzymin"
(Memorial Book of the Jewish Community of Radzymin
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html  


Radzyn - Podolski

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Pesach Tunkelschwartz 

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Rajgrod

Holocaust
Members of the Nazi Secret Police instigated the Polish escorts to execute the Jews by allowing one of them to shoot at the Jews


Rakow

A town in Kielce-Radom  Guberniya. 

Research
There are marriage partners from all over the Kielce-Radom area including: 
Chmielnik, Dzialoszyce, Iwaniska, Klimontow, Kurozweki, Lagow, Lipsko, Nowy Korczyn, Olesnica, Olkusz, Opatow, Ostrowikec, Ozarow, Pacanow, Pinczow, Polaniec, Sandomierz, Slupia Nowa, Staszow, Stopnica, Szydlow, Tarlow, Zawichost, and dozens of local villages


Rava Russkaya

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html 


Rawa Ruska

Research
Included in the JRI-PL database.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/agadtowns.html


Rejoice

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Tova Waks

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74


Rejowiec

A town in the Lublin District, 56 km ESE of the City of Lublin at 51 05 /23 17. 

Research
Records from 1860-1899 not filmed by the LDS (Mormons) have been indexed by the JRI-Poland team in Warsaw as part of the Lublin Polish State Archives (PSA) Project. Contact is Robinn Magid RobinnM@aol.com

*Summary of Rejowiec records being indexed*
There are more than 3000 records being indexed as part of this project. The types and years of records are as follows:
Births:    1458   
Grooms:   383   
Brides:     383
Deaths:    844   
Total:      3068  


Repid

Located in southeastern Poland and south of Sanok 


Rohatyn (Rogatin, Rohityn)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

"Rohatyn was a town in the Stanislawow district of Poland (today Ukraine).  At the turn of the century, the Jewish population was about 3,500 (half of the total population).  At the start of the war, the Jewish population was about 3,000. 

Cemetery
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rohatyn_Jewish_Cemetery_(35).jpg

Holocaust
The Germans occupied the town on July 2, 1941, and a Judenrat was established by the end of the month.  A ghetto was created in the Fall.  On March 20, 1942, over 2,000 Jews were shot to death in open pits near the railroad station.  Deportations to the Belzec death camp began in September.  The ghetto was liquidated in June, 1943.
http://www.edwardvictor.com/Ghettos/2006/Rohatyn.htm 

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/rohatyn.htm

http://www.jewishlink.net/holocaust.html

Landmanschaften
Contact for the Jewish Landmanschaften from Poland in Israel is Fishel Kirshen

http://jwa.org/archive/jsp/orgInfo.jsp?orgID=74

Research
The JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives lists Births, Marriages, Deaths records and the estimated cost of Indexing and the current status at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0vDMhyycmI (mostly in Russian - interview, but informative in any case)

Travel
"A Visit to Rohatyn in 2008"
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rohatyn/osborn/rohatyn_visit_2008f.html


Ropczyce

Yizkor Book
http://www.zchor.org/ropczyce/gdalia.htm


Rozdol

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/agad/agadtowns.html 


Rozhan  (Rozan)

Rozhan is located north east of Warsaw (75.8 KM) in the Makow Province

Cemetery
http://www.zchor.org/rozan/invitation.htm

List of Jewish Holocaust Martyrs of Rozan
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/rozan/Roz447.html

Surnames
http://j-pultusk.tripod.com/id20.html

"We Remember Jewish Rozhan"
http://www.zchor.org/rozan/rozan.htm

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Zikaron le-Kehilat Rozan"
(al ha-Narew) (Rozhan Memorial Book Poland) 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Rozniatow (Rozhniatov)


http://jgaliciabukovina.net/gallery-categories/specific-communities

Yizkor Book
"Rozniatow was a typical Jewish town in Galicia, with its joys and sorrows, a dear place, where the entire spectrum of the rainbow was represented, and life was interesting and multifaceted; a life of warm Jewish content, of desire to broaden horizons, thirst for Torah and its wisdom, a hope for a better future. Everything that took place in the multifaceted Jewish life of Galicia could be seen through the lens of Rozniatow."  From a posting by Thomas Weiss.

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rozniatow/Rozhnyatov.html


Rozwadow

Yizkor Book
The Yizkor Book is available at 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rozwadow/rozwadow.html#top  

"Sefer Yizkor Rozwadow ve-ha-Seviva" (Rozwadow Memorial Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html  


Rozwody

Research
Divorce Registers
for the years 1836, 1838-1841, and 1844 - 1847   Available at the Polish State Archives branch in Poznan 


Rudki  (Rudky and Рудки [Ukr], Rudki [Pol, Рудки-Rus], Ridik and רידיק [Yid], Riduk, Rudik.)

2010. Ukraine (Lvov, Janowska Camp, Komarno, Rudki) - DSC00554.JPG
http://my.opera.com/smclay/albums/showpic.dml?album=7319822&pic