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Bukovina      Bulgaria       Hungary     Russian Empire   Turkey

 

    Romania,  Bukovina and Moldova

 

 

                                       
                                          http://www.romaniajewishtours.com/

 

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Imagine walking the very same streets that your parents, grandparents or your great grandparents walked somewhere in Romania, Bucovina or Turkey, where they once lived.

Imagine the sights ... the sounds ... and the smells that must have been there ... before you became a part of this world.

Yes, there was a time when Jewish life compared more like the Sholom Aleichem stories we've all heard.  A time when making a living and studying Torah were the only important goals a Jew could hope to (and pray to) achieve. 


Romania is a country rich in Jewish heritage. The first Jews arrived as part of the Roman legions (Legion Judaica) that invaded Dacia in 101 A.D. During the Middle Ages, Jewish immigrants began settling in Walachia and Moldova, with ever-increasing numbers arriving after Spain's expulsion of the Jews in 1492. By the early 16th century, their number again increased by immigrants fleeing from Cossack uprisings in Poland and the Ukraine. Located in southeastern Europe, Romania borders the Black Sea and is between Bulgaria and Ukraine.  Today, there is a total population of 22.4 million.  Romania included the Danubian Principalities of Transylvania, Banat, Maramures, Valahia (Wallachia), Moldova, Bessarabia and Bucovina.  Today, all of these regions are in Romania and Moldova, with a portion in southern Ucraina (Ukraine) ROM SIG covers the Moldova and Transylvania areas 

http://www.romaniatourism.com/jewish-heritage.html

and click on Links where you will find a list of maps for Romania, Transylvania-Eastern Hungary, Austro-Hungarian Empire 1882, and Romania- Moldova-Balkans 1882.  In addition to many other helpful sites and a photo gallery, there is a link to the Jewish Community of Moldova.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html

Jewish people came from the most diverse locations and established here diverse cultures, architecture, giving Romania a diverse and wide-ranging heritage. Since most of the Romanian Jewish population were of Polish or Russian extraction, their religious and cultural traditions were similar to those of the Jewish population of Eastern Europe. Their rabbis and teachers, as well as their religious trends, came from there.

The spoken language of the Jewish population was Yiddish; Romanian became more widely used among them only in the second half of the 19th century, at the time when the first Romanian universities were established (Iasi in 1860 and Bucharest in 1864).

From the 800,000 who lived in Romania before the Holocaust, about half survived. Under the Communist dictatorship almost all left the country. Today in Romania there exists around 10,000 Jews, half of whom live in Bucharest and 75% of those are now living in old age.

Visitors will find poignant reminders of Romania’s Jewish heritage and their own Jewish roots, in nearly every village and certainly in every town. It’s possible to find signs everywhere that attest to one hundred years of Jewish life and prosperity.

In addition to the Bucharest community, there are organized communities in the Transylvania regions of Cluj, Oradea, Arad, Timisoara and in eastern Romania in Piatra-Neamt, Botosani, Iasi, Galati, Constanta, Ploiesti, Brasov, Sighet, Satu-Mare, and a large number of small communities. Ten kosher canteens are still operated by the communities and kosher meat is provided by three ritual providers.

Modern Romania began in 1859 with Prince Alexander John Cuza (Alexandru-Ioan Cuza) of Moldova and Wallachia.  As a nation, Romania began on January 24 to February 5, 1862 after the 1856 Congress of Paris declared the end of the Crimean War and decided that this area was to be independent, but under the Turkish suzerainty.  Bucharest is its capital city. A leading Israeli expert on the Holocaust in Romania, Jean Ancel, said that of the 760,000 Jews who once lived in Romanian-controlled territories during WW II, 420,000 were massacred.  Yad Vashem has published a two-volume book by Ancel on the subject.

There are today, about 6,000 Jews, mainly elderly,  still living in Romania with fewer than 1,000 of them under the age of 35.   If you are searching for Bessarabia, Bessarabien, or Moldova, this area is known as Moldova today - a region of today's Romania. 

The truth about Romania's western province is that it is one of the most scenic settings in the world.  The Borgo Mountains soar, while the Bistrita and Bargaului Valleys dip between them, home to medieval villages nestled among woodlands.

Search Europe
An excellent site to find information about most European countries - type in the name of the country you wish to research in the search field.  This site is a great source to find information for almost every European country.

http://searcheurope.com

Another valuable site to help find a person, maps, etc. - and type in the name of any country you wish to research. This service is free.

http://www.webhelp.com/home


Books

Documentary:
The Nobel Peace Prize winner and the world’s foremost author on the Holocaust experience takes a haunting journey to his hometown of Sighet, Romania for the first time in 20 years. Mr. Wiesel is made an honorary citizen of his hometown of Sighet, Romania, where he walks through the neighborhood in which he played and studied as a child. Despite mixed feelings, he sees a town unchanged since his deportation to Nazi concentration camps in 1944, except for one significant feature; not a single Jew lives in the entire village. Academy Award winning actor William Hurt reads passages from Mr. Wiesel’s renowned writings, including his first and most honored work, “Night,” published in 1958.

Added features include interviews of two of the nation’s leading authorities on the Holocaust: - Rabbi Marvin Hier, Founder and Dean of the Simon Wiesental Center and its acclaimed Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles Professor Bernard Goldberg, Director of The American Jewish Cultural Studies Program at West Los Angeles College. Running Time: 105 minutes
ISBN No: 1-930545-62-2 
https://www.choicesvideo.net/newchoices/index.html


"Anthology of the Dorohoi Country Since The 15th Century"
After WW II, this county has been included into that one of Botosani.  Romanian Title: "Generatii de judaism sionism: DOROHOI (+Saveni, Mihaileni, Darabani, Herta, Radauti-Prut)"  English Title: "Generations of Jewishness and Zionism: DOROHOI (+Saveni, Mihaileni, Darabani, Hertza, Radautz-Prut)"  Redactor and Coordinator: Shlomo David.  5 Volumes, about 3,500 pages together, bilingual (Romanian + Hebrew).  The Romanian halves (from left to right) and the Hebrew ones (from right to left) do mostly contain different info.  There are Latin and Hebrew "Summary" lists.  Submitted by Alex Finkelstein@mail.biu.ac.il


"Gazetteer of the former Galicia and Bukowina"
Produced by Felix Gundacher of the Institute of Historical Family Research in Vienna, has a CD-Rom of maps from the 1880s.  The Institute has a web site - for useful looking resources and advice.
http://ihff.nwy.at/index.htm/
   


"Janka Festinger's Moments of Happiness: Her Holocaust Story and more"
Authored by David D. Speace 


"Jewish Immigration from Romania" 
Reference: RG76; IMMIGRATION, Series I-A-1, Volume 359, Reel C-10262, File: 426364 referred to on the on-line Canadian National Archives web site.  
http://www.ingeneas.com
 


"Janka Festinger's Moments of Happiness: Her Holocaust Story and more"
Authored by David D. Speace 


"Jewish Heritage Travel" 
Authored by Ruth Gruber and published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. in 1984.


"Jewish Roots in Ukraine and Moldova: Pages from the Past and Archival Inventories"
Author Miriam Weiner Buy from Amazon.com Buy from Amazon.com


"Memorial to the Jews Deported from France 1942-44"
Authored by Beate Klarsfeld, was published after 1978 in English and should be available from F.F.D.J.F  32, rue la Boetie, 75008 Paris, France or The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation 515 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10022. The book lists 3,000 Romanians on this list.


"Romania, The Jewries of the Levant after the Fourth Crusade"
Authored by Joshua Starr in 1949.  On page 56, there are 7 names given. 


"Romanian Jewish Collection"
Many books containing Romanian information available at this site

http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/fedrom_12.html


"Stefanesti: Portrait of a Romanian Shtetl"
Authored by Ghitta Sternberg and published by Pergamon Press in 1984.


"The Who's Who of the Jews born in Romania"
A listing of people of to-day and the people from the past by professions and much more at
http://www.alpas.net/uli/jewish.romania/who'swho_engl.htm
 


 

General
Romanian Genealogy Information   
   

 
   Find your Ancestors in Romania
  http://www.radixlog.com/subjects/romania


This ROM-SIG site contains the names of the shtetls (towns) of Romania including Romania, Moldova and Southwestern UkraineMoldova (Moldavia)  Transylvania (Transylvania)  Valahia (Wallachia)  Banat  Basarabia (Bessarabia) Bucovina  Dobrogea  Maramures.  For each town, the county (judete), region and country is listed.  If you click on the town name, you can get additional information.

The towns, regions and countries included in the town list are the currently designations used.  Changes in national boundaries occurred since pre-World War I times.  Therefore, a shtetl may have been in one of the countries covered by the ROM-SIG that was in Russia, Hungary, The Ottoman Empire, or Austria in earlier centuries 
http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/Shtetls/Romania.htm 

Note that Transylvania had one register for all religions denoting religion in a column, whereas Poland and Ukraine have separate registers for each religion.

http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/fedrom_02.html

All of the Pinkasim translations are indexed
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania.html

All Romania Database
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania

Over 40,000 new records have been added, consisting of two components:

* Kishinev Vital Records:

The database contains over 25,700 birth records and over 6,400 marriage and divorce records from Kishinev, Moldova.  Kishinev was formerly in Bessarabia Guberniya of the Russian Empire.  The original records are located in the National Archives of the Republic of Moldova in Kishinev (Chisinau).

Contains birth, marriage, divorce and death records from 1829 to 1915.  Many records remain to be transliterated; work to transliterate these records is ongoing.


Detailed information about the Kishinev vital records database Contact is Bob Wascou robertw252@aol.com 
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/KishinevVRs.htm

* Bessarabia Duma Voter Lists, 1906-07:

Over 17,000 new records, primarily for the Uyezds (districts) of Bendery and Soroki

This includes the towns of Bendery (Tighina), Kaushany (Causeni), Romanovka  (Basarabeasca), Chimishliya (Cimislia), and Ataki (Otaci), all currently in Moldova, and smaller towns in Bendery district.  Data for Orgieev, Bieltsy and Khotin districts were previously transcribed.  There are over 80,000 records still to be transcribed. Contact Terry Lasky  lasky@bwn.net
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/BessarabiaDuma.htm

All of these records are accessible amongst the more than
120,000 records in the JewishGen All Romania Database.
From a posting by Warren Blatt
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania  

1848 Census Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/1848Introduction.htm


"1942 Census of Jewish males born in Romania, 1881-1892"
This database can be found at

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/1942CensusOlderMen.htm

It is derived from a census drawn up during the Antonescu regime in 1942, of males born in Romania between 1881-1892, and who were deemed to old for work in Labor Camps.  The entire census, obtained from the Federation of Jewish Communities (FEDROM) in Bucharest by Prof. Ladislau Gyemant for the JewishGen Romania Special Interest Group (ROM-SIG), consists of some 300+ pages containing about 8,200 entries.  This first installment of the database contains 3,275 records, with the remainder to follow.

Census of those born between 1893-1921, who were sent to the camps
The list contains more than 300 pages, and over 8,000 entries
http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1421

http://www.russianroots.ca/mmg.htm

This is our first database which uses the Romanian alphabet. Our Daitch- Mokotoff Soundex algorithm has been enhanced to account for Romanian diacriticals (i.e. the letter "t" with a cedilla has the "ts" sound").

The "1942 Census of Jewish males born in Romania, 1881-1892" database
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/1942CensusOlderMen.htm


Archives   (Romanian Archives in Bbucuresti)

It is becoming easier to access records in the Romanian archives, whether in person or by mail. It is no longer necessary to get permission from the National Archives in Bucuresti for permission to enter regional archives. It is recommended, however, that a person write ahead of time to the local archives indicating arrival date and what types of records and family names will be of interest. This will enable the archives to have records available upon arrival.

The Rom-SIG website now has a list of locations of Romanian archives that includes addresses, phone numbers, fax numbers, and, in a few cases, email addresses. It is a PDF file that can be downloaded at

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/New/Links.html

Scroll down to the heading “Romanian Links.” The site also includes a form letter, written in Romanian, for communicating with archives. It also is a PDF file that can be downloaded from the Rom-SIG home page,  It is the last entry in the left column.
http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/

It is also possible to request records by mail. The recommended procedure is to contact the Romanian embassy in your country and ask how to obtain records. They may direct you to a website where you can a download an application form. One researcher in England claims the cost was £28 (about $55) per record).


Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People (CAHJP)

http://www.orthohelp.com/geneal/sefardim.htm


Diplomatic Representation in the US

Chief of Mission:
Ambassador Mircea Dan Geoana
1607 23rd Street NW
Washington, DC 20008
Phone: (202) 332 4846, 4848, 4851; 
Fax: 1 202 232 4748
Consulate (s) General: Los Angeles and in New York.

Diplomatic Representation from the US
Chief of Mission, Ambassador James C. Rosapepe.  Embassy:
Strada Tudor Arghezi 7-9, Bucharest
http://romania.usembassy.gov/

American Embassy Bucharest
Department of State
Washington, D.C. 20521 (pouch) 
Phone; (40) 1 210 01 49 210 40 42;  Fax 40 1 210 03 95; 

Branch Office: Cluj-Napoca


East European Genealogical Society

Site with a lot of information
http://www.eegsociety.org/Home.aspx


Embassy Addresses

Chancery of Romania
Located at 1607 23rd Street NW
Washington, DC 20008
Phone 1 202 332 4846, 4848, 4851  FAX: 1 202 232 4748.  
http://tracingroots.nova.org/
 

List of Romanian Embassies
http://www.romania.org/embassy/

US Embassy:
Strada Tudor Arghezi 7-9, Bucharest.  Mailing address:
American Embassy
Bucharest
Department of State
Washington, DC 20521-5260 (pouch)
Phone: 40 1 210 01 49 210 40 42  FAX 40 1 210 03 95. 
 
http://www.usembassy.ro/ 

A branch office is located in Cluj-Napoca 


Family Tree

Dr. Zisu Lebel's Genealogical Tree - Each entry in this list includes the names of:

The village - The pre World War I Hungarian county (megye) or Austrian Galician district (Bezirk)

The present administrative subdivision: Okres in Slovakia Raion in Ukraine: Wojewodztwo in Poland: Judte in Romania

http://carpatho-rusyn.org/villages.htm 


Fusgeyers


http://digital.cjh.org/R/HIAD3BAQ6VA529C1J3CPD3A422LL49USRS3KJJPGJG9PS2
MLFX-00426?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=307862&local_base=GEN01&pds_handle=GUEST
 

A German term usually applied to the Romanian Jews who walked for hundreds of miles to Hamburg.  They walked in groups, sometimes whole families walked together.


History of Romania

Available at a wonderful web site at
http://home.sol.no/~romemb/history.htm#MIDDLE 


History of Romanians

Very complete and informative site
http://domino.kappa.ro/guvern/istoria-e.html


Holocaust


The Massacres in Bessarabia, Bucovina and Dorohoi County
Approximately 800,000 Jews were living in Greater Rumania before the war. According to the last official census on December 19, 1930, there were 756,930 people. More than one third of these (314,933) lived in the counties of Bessarabia, Bucovina and Dorohoi
http://www.logon.org/_domain/holocaustrevealed.org/Romania/Matatias/
Transnistria2.htm


Jewish Community

Federation of Jewish Communities in Romania
Bucharest R70478
Romania
http://www.romanianjewish.org/
 


Jewish History of Romania

There is a great deal of information about the History of the Jews of Romania
http://www.heritagefilms.com/ROMANIA.html


The Jews of Romania

A virtual exhibition sponsored by Beth Ha'tefutsorth explaining Romanian Jewish culture, Jewish family life, Holocaust, emigration and community life through this fascinating exhibition featuring on-line by the Diaspora Museum. You will find interactive maps, beautiful graphics and audio/video files. There is a clickable photo gallery that showcases the Romanian Jewish experience through time.
http://www.bh.org.il/V-Exh/Romania  

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/romania.html


Landsmanshaftn and other Romania Societies

A list of over 1380 organizations includes all Landsmanshaftn listed in A Guide to YIVO's Landsmanshaftn Archive by Rosaline Schwartz and Susan Milamed, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, New York, 1986, and Guide to the YIVO Archives, compiled and edited by Fruma Mohrer and Marek Web, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, 1998. The list also includes the additional Landsmanshaftn collections that YIVO has acquired since then that have been catalogued. Several synagogues and other Jewish organizations are also included if their YIVO file contains records pertaining to burials or if they have a cemetery plot in the New York metropolitan area. Indicated on this list is whether or not an organization contains a cemetery plot map, but you may also see Burial Societies in the New York Metropolitan Area for a separate listing of burial societies in YIVO's landsmanshaftn collection that contain one or more plot maps.

http://www.jgsny.org/yivo-collection-list


Linguistics

The letter "K" is a non-Latin one, but an Anglo-Saxon letter, therefore "deep" Romanian words shouldn't be written with a "K", but with a "C" instead according to Alex Finkelstein.  He further states that the same observation is true about the letter "Y".  This is a left over from the Austro-Hungarian period.

Romanian Language - How To Understand
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZK9sCeagNc


  Maps    

Global Gazetteer is a great web site. It is a directory of  2,880,532 of the world's cities and towns, sorted by country and linked to a map for each town.  A tab separated list is available for each country.
www.calle.com/world/
 

Maps
covering the Romania/Moldova Region - Transylvania-Eastern Hungary - Austro-Hungarian Empire 1882
 

Maps of Romania
http://www.europeetravel.com/maps/romania-map.htm

Open Street Maps
The crowd-sourced mapping project OpenStreetMap has amassed a million contributors since its inception in 2005 and, according to navigation app maker Skobbler, boasts greater accuracy in England, Russia and Germany than rivals such as Google Maps.  I tried the site and found an accurate drawing of my father's ancestral town Tal'ne, Ukraine.  Almost every country is available as is most towns
http://openstreetmap.org

RomSig - Map of Romania; Romanian Map Collection; List of Towns; Map of Moldavia
http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/

ShtetlSeeker
Locate your town (shtetl)

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlseeker/loctown.htm

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~romwgw/districthotmap.html 


Music

"A Mazeldiker Yid: Old time Klezmer From East Europe"
Klezmer still lives in the mountains of Romania where Di Naye Kapelye with Mihaly Sipos and Peter Eri of Muzikas compile a lively recording using folk instruments such as the  cimbalom.  Music is part of our heritage so listen at 
www.hatikvahmusic.com
 


Professions - List of

Don Seligman has created a database of professions
www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/ 


Researchers in Romania and Hungary  

Professional Researchers
The Special Interest Group for Romanian Jewish Genealogy offers a wonderful informational site about dealing with professional researchers at
http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/rsdb/prof-sum.html
 

Alexander Dunai 
Professional researcher dunai@iname.com (located in L'viv, Ukraine)

Ladislau Gyemant, PhD
Professional genealogical researcher, Professor of Jewish History at the University of Cluj-Napoca,  communicates in English Phone 011 40 64 167256 or Email: gyemant@zortec.ro
 

Gheorghe Mireuta
Professional researcher ram@sisnet.ro


Romanian Interest Site                               

Haifa Internet
http://www.alpas.net/uli/
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/

http://www.romaniatourism.com/jewish-heritage.html

http://www.archives.com/genealogy/family-heritage-jewish.html


Romanian Jewish Community

"Between 1859-1860 there were 3,288 Jews; in 1899 - 4,019, in 1930 - 5,925. A statistics situation, after a documentary included in the volume "The contribution to the culture and civilization of the Jews from Romania", it shows the "Activity of the Mosaic Cult in all over the country, between 1918-1943". Thus, "The Roman district office": in 1940 - 5,689 souls, 18 synagogues and two cemeteries. Rabbis, two cemeteries; in 1941 - 6,485 souls, 18 synagogues and two Rabbis, two cemeteries; in 1942 - 18 functional synagogues with two Rabbis (Isacsohn Salomon and Frenkel Mendel), five Hahams, two psalm readers and 16 clerics. There were about 7,000 Jews in Roman (including the Jews evacuated from the neighboring villages: Bozieni, Bara, Demienesti, Bacesti); in 1943 - 6,470 souls, 18 synagogues and 2 Rabbis, two cemeteries.  More information
http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/mosteniri_ale_culturii_iudaice_03_11_03.html


Romanian Jewish Heritage

An international commission created by the President of Romania will examine the history of the Holocaust in Romania for the purpose of establishing the facts of this event and disseminating its findings in Romania and abroad. The Commission will consist of recognized historians and public figures whose scholarship and participation are intended to insure its credibility and authority. It will be chaired by Nobel Peace Laureate Elie Wiesel.

Jewish presence in the geopolitical context of the Romanian countries in the 14th-18th century  

http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=838

http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=840


Romanian Jewish Heritage Trail Map

http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=835 


Romanian Newspaper Links

http://newslink.org/eurom.html

http://www.isro-press.net/Portal/index.php?view=article&catid=114%3Aenglish-content&id=497%3Aisro-press-manifest&option=com_content&Itemid=110


Romanian  Town Photos

Photos of Polish Towns, Ukrainian Towns, Hungarian Towns and Romanian Towns

http://polishjews.org/

http://polishjews.org/photos/index.htm

You might also want to review the towns listed in my Galician page and you can also search for Vital Records for Galician Towns by visiting 
http://www.polishroots.org/galicia_towns.htm


Romanian Resources

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/


Romania Special Interest Group (ROMSIG

The countries known today as Romania and Moldova, as well as the southwestern portion of Ukraine and Southern Hungary are the areas of interest. Included in these countries are the areas formerly known as Bucovina, Moldavia, Bessarabia, Transylvania, Walachia and The Banat. The site includes Photos, links.  This SIG provides a 'full service' home on the web which includes a complete table of contents for each issue; an archive link; a database of all towns in Romania, Moldova and southern Ukraine, showing latitude/longitude, alternate names and all towns within a selected distance of a specified town - and more. The website includes a complete table of contents for each of the 21 issues of the SIG quarterly journal; description of the family finder; database of all towns in Romania, Moldava and southern Ukraine, showing latitude, longitude, alternate names, etc.: a list of professional researchers with basic information about their services; and information about ROM-SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/Newsletters/5-1%20Fall%201996.pdf

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/Newsletters/5-4%20Summer%201997.pdf

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/botosani/BOT_CITIES.html

"All Romania Database"
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania

Nearly 40,000 new records have been added, including:

* 25,000 new records in the Bessarabia Duma Voter Lists, 1906-07, primarily for the Khotin and Bieltsy districts.  This includes the towns of:

Foleshty (Falesti), Ryshanovka (Riscani), Skulyany (Sculeni), Brichany (Briceni), Lipkany (Lipcani), Yedintsy (Edinet)
and a major update to Orgeyev (Orhei), all currently in Moldova, and Khotin, Novoselitsy (Novosel'tsy) and Sekuryany (Sokiryany), currently in Ukraine. All of the smaller towns and villages in the Orgieev, Bieltsy and Khotin districts have also been completed.

The database will continue to grow. There are over 100,000 records still to be transcribed. Contact Terry Lasky  tlasky@bwn.net 

The Silesian Digital Library
is online and has scans of three volumes of Ksiega pamiatkowa i adresowa wygnancow wojennych z Galicyi i Bukowiny 1914–1915 oraz Album pamiatkowe (The Memorial, Address and Photo Album Directory of the War Refugees from Galicia and Bukovina 1914–1915). There are few photos of people; most are of places.
http://www.sbc.katowice.pl/dlibra
 

The volume for Lwow can be found at
http://www.sbc.katowice.pl/dlibra/docmetadata?id=1013

 
The volume for Krakow is at
http://www.sbc.katowice.pl/dlibra/docmetadata?id=1021
 

The volume for the rest of Galicia and for Bukovina is at http://www.sbc.katowice.pl/dlibra/docmetadata?id=929

There is an excellent description of the contents of these books and how to use the search engine by Logan Kleinwaks in the Rom-SIG Digest. To retrieve the message, send Email: to
lyris@lyris.jewishgen.org  and in the body of the message write "get rom-sig 20070103" (without the quote marks).

Bessarabia Duma Voter Lists

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/BessarabiaDuma.htm

Major revisions have been made to the "Database Data" and "Database Columns" sections of this introduction.

* 5,000 additional records, completing the "Tabele Barbitalor - 1942 Census of Jewish males born in Romania, 1881-1892".

It is derived from a census drawn up during the Antonescu regime in 1942, of males born in Romania between 1881-1892, and who were deemed to old for work in Labor Camps.

The JewishGen ROM-SIG also has in its possession the census of men born between 1893-1921, who were sent to the camps. The list contains more than 300 pages, and over 8,000 entries.

Rosanne Leeson Leeson1@attglobal.net along with Paula Zieselman are Co-Coordinators of ROM-SIG and welcome suggestions or photos and materials to be added to the site.


Romanian on-line Phone Directory (in English

 

http://www.whitepages.ro/ 

Yellow Pages
www.yellowpages.ro

www.jewishgen.org/romsig


Search Engines for Romania

Scroll down to 'Search Engines'
http://slavic.ohio-state.edu/people/yoo/links/default.htm


Sephardic Jewish Community of Romania

http://sephardichouse.org/

http://www.sephardicstudies.org/romania.html

http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Sephardim

http://www.imageusa.com/index.php/component/content/article/36-jewish-communities/768-the-jews-of-romania.html


Shtetls of Romania

To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_shtetls

  
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 


Slavophilia

A comprehensive guide to Internet resources on Russia and Central/Eastern Europe 
http://www.slavophilia.com/


Street Name Meanings:

Soseaua

(abbreviation: sos)

means 'the road'

str.

stands for Strada

meaning 'street'

dr.

stands for drumul

meaning 'way'

cal.

stands for calea

also means 'way'

blvd.

stands for bulevardl

meaning 'boulevard

intr.

stands for intrarea

meaning 'entrance' or small street

Thanks to Alex Finkelstein Alex.Finkelstein@mail.biu.ac.il who provided the Street Name Meanings and other Romanian information.


Struma Tragedy


http://www.flickr.com/photos/9679871@N04/5526416189/

This is the rickety old ship with 789 Romanian Jewish refugees (all of whom died including 103 children except for one that lived) that was sunk either by a Russian sub or a mine, near Istanbul in the Black Sea on February 23, 1942 (story is in English
http://www.alpas.net/uli/struma/struma_engl.htm
 

List of victims

http://www.sephardicstudies.org/struma.html

The refugees left the port of Constanta, Romania (the last ship to leave Germany carrying refugees who were bound for Palestine) were trying to reach Turkey or Palestine, but didn't have Visas for either country although the fare was to include Visas for Palestine.  The boat was in very poor condition and was denied entrance to Istanbul.  The boat was being towed away from Turkey and into The Bosporus sea by a tug, since its engine was not working.  There were only five survivors and
three of those died in turkey.  The British government of the day steadfastedly refused them visas to Palestine as illegal entrants of an enemy country.  The local Turkish community helped feed the passengers during the 70 days that the ship remained in the port.

The British authorities in Palestine had set tight limits on Jewish immigration.  The British transferred the Struma's passengers, along with those of two other boats, to another ship, the Patria, intending to send them to detention in Mauritius.  According to a story in  the February 2003 issue of Hadassah Magazine, a Haganah bomb, meant to keep the Patriah from leaving for Mauritius, sank the ship.


Books


"Death on the Black Sea"
About the Struma.  A very comprehensive list of the passengers is included.  You may purchase this book through my link with Amazon.com to your left on this page.
http://sephardichouse.org/


Synagogues of Romania

http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=46


Translation Service  

A commercial site offering many language translating programs
http://www.worldlanguage.com

Translating Services - Languages

Just in case you didn't think of it, contact a nearby university or college's foreign language department.  They may offer to write letters and translate letters into English.  A nominal fee is usually charged.


Traveling through Romania Personal Stories

Very interesting site
http://fernando-hideaway.blogspot.com/

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/


Yizkor Books


 

Romanian Cities and Towns

                                        

http://www.aboutromania.com/maps00.html


Judete

The present name for the administrative subdivision
http://carpatho-rusyn.org/villages.htr 

In the near future, the about 40 'judete' (counties) are going to become 8 "regiuni" (singular: regiune) meaning regions, as a request prior to the acceptance of Romania into NATO and other European organizations.

 Administrative Divisions

 40 counties (Judete, singular - judet)

1 municipality (municipiu)

 

 

 Alba

 Arad

Arges

Bacau

Bihor

Bistrita-Nasaud

Botosani

Brailla

Brasov

Bucuresti Buzau

Calarasi

Caras-Severin

Cluj

Constanta

Covasna

Dambovita

Dolj

Galati

Gorj

Giurgiu

 Dorohoi

 

 

 

 

Harghita

Hunedoara

Ialomita

Iasi

Maramures

 Ilfov

 

 

 

 

Mehedinti

Mures

Neamt

Olt

Prahova

 Salaj

 Satu  Mare

Sibiu

Suceava

Teleorman

 Timis

Tulcea

Vaslui

Vilcea

Vrancea

Note: Moldova is today the northeast area of Romania, but is also an independent state from USSR (CCCP) Both areas together, represent the original Moldova, prior to 1940 as Romanian area.  Corrections and this statement were contributed by Alex.Finkelstein@mail.biu.ac.il 


Alba Iulia


Old Synagogue in Alba Iulia - Year built: 1822 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0001_0_00666.html


Arad


Synagogue in Arad - Year built: 1834 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/0146_Arad_Census.html


Azuga - Prahova County

To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania  
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html

 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Bacau

Grain Merchants' Temple in Bacau - Year built: 1899
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Baia Mare

 

http://www.romaniatourism.com/baia-mare.html

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0003_0_01888.html

http://www.jewnet.ru/eng/orgs/?action=search

Research
http://www.maramarosjewishrecords.com/


Balaceana

Some of the pages of this Yizkor book "Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina"  for this shtetl can be viewed (and it is in English)

http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameResults.html?placeBirth=Balaceana,%20%20
Suceava,%20%20Bukovina,%20%20Romania&placeBirthType=LITERAL&language=en


http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html  

http://books.google.com/books?id=MFn3KeENnA0C&pg=PA80&lpg=PA80&dq=Balaceana+jewish&source=bl&ots
=W25eqlntIE&sig=iKv8o1WQtwt6l4bFC5pmTxQ19Iw&hl=en#v=onepage&q=Balaceana
%20jewish&f=false


Banat Region

A collection of oral histories by Jews living in this region, located in southwestern Romania, has been published.  "Rescued Memory: The Jews of the Banat Yesterday and Today," the fruit of four years' work is the latest volume in a series of anthropological and oral history research conducted by the Third Europe Foundation, based in the city of Timisorara.  About 12,000 Jews lived in the region before WW II.  Only about 400, mainly elderly, remain there today.
http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/


Beius (Belenyes)

Known previously as Belenyes - there were Jews living here at one time.
http://www.seraphicpress.com/archives/2006/03/how_many_jews.php
 

http://www.avotaynu.com/books/encytowns.htm

http://www.iajgs.org/cemetery/romania/beius-bihor-county-transylvania.html


Berlad

There was a Jewish presence prior to WW II
http://encyclopedia.jrank.org/BEC_BER/BERLAD.html


Berzen

Near the border of Moldova

  Map

For a map of the area   
http://www.expedia.com
 


Bihor County

Coordinator is Fran Meng  
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html 


Bivolari

There is a Yizkor Book ("Ayaratenu Bivolari" - Our Town Bivolari)) and there is/was a Bivolari Immigrants Organization in Israel in Haifa
http://www.isragen.org.il/YIZ/BarIlan_books.htm


Bocicoiu Mare (Romanian Byhkov) Maramures County. 

Cemetery
To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania  
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html

 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Borsa

Yizkor Book
There are 517 entries

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Yizkor

The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs -- published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the Yizkor Book Project site at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
 

This database is only an index of names; it directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more complete information may be available. This database currently contains over 186,000 entries from the necrologies of 210 different Yizkor Books.


Botosani


Great Synagogue in Botosani - Year built: 1834 

A most important Jewish settlement - not as a county, but as a city.
http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/mosteniri_ale_culturii_iudaice_03_11_10.html

http://web.mac.com/ruthellengruber/iWeb/general%20site/Botosani%20photos.html


Braila

  
  Great Synagogue at Braila 
 http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

There was a substantial Jewish Presence before WW II and located  at the mouth of the Danube. 
http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/mosteniri_ale_culturii_iudaice_03_11_12.html

http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.eeurope.romania.braila/47/mb.ashx

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0004_0_03424.html


Brasov


The Synagogue 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

The second largest city in Romania. Strolling along the winding streets of medieval Brasov, you'll find cathedrals, a fortress, a Franciscan monastery and buildings which once housed the craftsmen and jewelers who made Brasov legendary throughout the region.  David Gordon dgordon@interaccess.com offers to make copies of photos he has taken of six synagogues
http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/


Breaza

Prahova County. To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania  
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Brebu - Prahova County

To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania   
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Brichany

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Brister

http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Bucurest/Ilfov County

Coordinator - Shana Lipsker 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
  


Bucharest (Bucuresti)

    
Bucharest Synagogue Photo Courtesy of
Heritage Films

Choral Temple, Bucharest Year built: 1866,1932, 1945 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

Capital city. This was the capital of one of the 3 principates (Valahia) prior to 1859. It is believed to have been founded in the late 14th century by a shepherd named Bucur.  The city later became a residence of the Walachian princes and the name was changed to Bucharest.  In 1859, Wallachia and Moldavia merged and Bucharest became the capital of Romania.  It was once known as the "Paris of the East". Its citizens lived it up with glittering parties, grand entertainments, and fashionable lifestyles - befitting the folkloric meaning of its name: City of Joy.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/

Choral Temple of Bucharest 
 
http://www.inyourpocket.com/romania/bucharest/sightseeing/jewishbucharest/
Choral-Temple_14802v
 


Holy Union Temple, Bucharest Year built: 1836
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

http://www.romaniatourism.com/bucharest.html

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mystroh/sets/72157608384322057/comments/

http://www1.american.edu/dlublin/travel/bucharest3.html


Buhusi

Located in Bacau province, had a population of 8,198 in 1948 and was located on a railroad line about 20 miles southeast of Piatra Neami.  It was a woolen and textile manufacturing center and also did oil refining, distilling and manufacturing of candles and cheese.  
http://motic.wiesenthal.com/pages/t012/t01244.html
   

Ruth Gruber's "Jewish Heritage Travel" writes that it was a noted Chassidic center headed by Rabbi Isaac Friedman of the Ruzhyn Dynasty and still has its 'marvelous' synagogue which is well maintained although it was vandalized in the 1980s.


Burdujeni

"Memories of Burdujeni"
Authored by Ruth Goldsmith
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/burdujeni.htm
  

This shtetl is in Moldavia, which was in northwestern Romania on the Austro Romanian border.  In 1820 there were 183 Jewish taxpaying head of families; by the middle of the century, the Jews were the majority of the town's population.  By 1899 the Jewish population had increased to 2,038 according to the article. 

For additional information about this region located in Bukowina, Bukowina


Busteni

Prahova County. To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Buzau


Temple of Buzau Year built: 1910 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Calarash (Calarasi)

Once was in Bessarabia and now in Moldova Republic and up to WWI was in Romania.


Camaras

A small village where 126 Jews died in WW II.  There is a cemetery which has a monument dedicated to those who were slain.
http://www.holocaustrevealed.org/_domain/holocaustrevealed.org/Romania/
Matatias/
Iron_Guard2.htm


Campina


Synagogue at Campina
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Caransebes

 
 
 Synagogue at Caransebes - Year built: 1893 
 
 http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Carnatin (Poeinile de Sub Munte, Havas Meso)

To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania  
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/poienile/poienile.htm


http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html

http://www.dinur.org/resources/resourceKeywordManual.aspx?letter=C&rsid=0


Cernavoda

A river port that is consider the "Rivera of the Black Sea"

Cemetery
http://www.iajgs.org/cemetery/romania/cernavoda-constanta-county.html

http://www.aboutromania.com/geography.html


Cetatea Alba (Akkerman, Belgorod-Dnestrovsky)

A city, Odessa Oblast (province) located in southernmost Ukraine.  In Turkish it is known as Akkerman and in Russian as Belgorod-Dnestrovsky.  There is a lot of historical information available at  
http://www.britannica.com/seo/b/bilhorod-dnistrovskyy/


Cheia

Prahova County. To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania   
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Cidreag

Located on the border where Romania, Hungary and Ukraine meet.  It is south of Vynohradiv, Ukraine and north of Satu Mare in Romania.  Before, while it was in Austria-Hungary, it was in Ugocsa county in Hungary

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/romania/cidreag-satu-mare-county-maramures-region.html


Cluj (Cluj-Napoca) (Kolozsvar)

 

Formerly known as Kolozsvar and was located in Hungary.  This is one of the capital cities of the three principates (Transylvania)  prior to 1859.  The Napoca secondary name has been added to the Cluj city name because this was the name of this settlement during ancient times.

Cluj Napoca Discussion List - This the coolest, newest and possibly funniest, discussion list about the Young Romanian Jewish community of Cluj Napoca and also about all the other Romanian Jewish Communities, their activities, their members, and their life, and all regarding it 
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/otercluj/
  

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/

Synagogue
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Comana De Jos

Contact George Paltan. There are Regional Special Interest Groups that have Romanian  information and links.  The site includes links to Bohemia-Moravia SIG, Denmark SIG, German-Jewish SIG, Hungary SIG and Stammbaum - German SIG at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html


Constanta

                                 
Temple of Constanta - Year built 1911              Ashkenazi Synagogue at Constanta

Originally captured by the Greeks, followed by the Romans and Turks, and finally by the  Romanians, who acquired this seaside resort in 1878.  It has since become Romania's most important seaport.  The old section is known as Piata Ovidiu.

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0005_0_04588.html

http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/index_isro_arhiva_23.html

http://www.geschichteinchronologie.ch/eu/rumaenien/EncJud_juden-in-Constanta-Kuestendje-ENGL.html


Craciunesti (Karasonfalva, Kretsnif)

Yizkor Book
http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/tt/121f4/

http://www.pbs.org/jewishamericans/share/immigration.html


Craiova - Dolj County

Choral Temple, Craiova Year built: 1832 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania    
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Czernowitz Ober-Gymnasium

Discussion group
http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/

http://www.sbg.ac.at/ges/people/lichtblau/cape.html

Holocaust
http://www1.yadvashem.org/about_HOLocaust/chronology/1939-1941/1941/chronology_1941_37.html


Dicanesti (Dekanesd)

Formerly known as Dekanesd

http://www.phc.edu/rt_baskerville_20120716.php

http://www.plug-u.net/rotube/cu_romani2/video/34774


Dolj County

Craiova is the county seat.  There is a ShtetLinks page that includes, photos, maps and music for Dolj County
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/dolj/Dolj.html

http://parizs.tripod.com/romania/dolj.html

Coordinator for Region / District Studies is Bobbi Cohen


Dornesti

Holocaust
http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameResults.html?placeBirth=Dornesti,%20%20Radauti,%20%20Bukovina,%20%20Romania&placeBirthType=LITERAL&language=en

  Map

Travel
http://www.accommodationdotcom.com/dornesti-accommodation-romania/

Yizkor Book
"Geschichte Der Juden in der Bukowina"
(Domesti (Hadikfalva)
" from Volume II of "History of the Jews in the Bukowina")
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00482.html


Dorohoi

The county seat, with a large Jewish population.  In 1940, before Romania joined WW II on the Nazi side, it was already clear to all in which direction the wind was blowing.  The Jews were expelled first from all the shtetls and villages, and then from Dorohoi, as well as from the other medium size Jewish towns in the area, Botoshani.  Most of them fled to Iasi (Yass), the capital of Moldova at that time

Cemetery

Three headstones bearing the surname Abramovici, from left to right: Shmuel ben Chaim Abramovici, died 3 October 1943; Gusta (Golda) bat Zvi-Eliezer Abramovici, died 23 January 1948; Yona ben Elimelekh Abramovici, died 9 May 1945.  
http://hashkedim.com/doropix.html

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0005_0_05350.html

Dorohoi Jewish Community 
Address: Str. Spiru Haret 95
Telephone: (231) 611.797

History
http://www.romaniatourism.com/jewish-heritage.html#Dorohoi

Holocaust
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/0091_Dorohoi.html

Organizations
The Organization of Jews Born in the Dorohoi District (OJBDD)
http://www.pasthound.com/topics/Dorohoi?PHPSESSID=qibv95a5e876khge2jvjp51g12

Pogrom
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorohoi_pogrom

Research
Jewish Register of Dorohoi 1836
A unique Jewish register has been found in the Archives of the city Iasi, Romania. The original document is written in Cyrillic alphabet and a copy of it rewritten with Latin characters was donated to the Institute Goren-Goldstein of the University of Tel Aviv. The register contains description of 305 Jewish households living at that time in Dorohoi
http://www.alpas.net/uli/shtetl/dorohoi1836.htm

Synagogues
Only one of the two remaining synagogues is still in use in this little Moldovan town where Jews from Poland settled in the 17th century. By the beginning of World War II, some 5,300 Jews were living here, with Hasidism becoming a major force. On November 11, 1941, the majority of families were sent to labor camps in Transnistria. Today, fewer than 50 Jews live in Dorohoi

Templul Evreiesc

Jewish School 

Shilul Rabinilor

Bresler Shill 

Vijnitzer Shil Talmud Toire 

Synagoga mica "Hardt

Yizkor Book
 


Edineti  (see Yedenitz below)


Falticieni

According to the statistics, in 1805 there were 848 Jews; in 1859- 5,765; and in 1899 there were 5,500; in 1930 - 4,046 souls. After the 1941 census, was estimated that the Jewish population in Falticeni decreased to 4,020 souls and, in 1947, their number was 4,700, and in 1950- only 3,000.

http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/mosteniri_ale_culturii_iudaice_03_11_06.html

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0006_0_06265.html


Focsoni (Focsani)

There was a Jewish presence prior to WW II. The first evidence of Jewish existence in Focsani goes back to the 17th century

http://www.jew-focsani.com/eng/jewish_history.html

http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/mosteniri_ale_culturii_iudaice_03_13.html

Cemetery
Remains of a Jewish cemetery has been acknowledged
http://www.jew-focsani.com/eng/graves.html


Frautii Noi

http://alina_stefanescu.typepad.com/romania_revealed/the-shoah-in-romania.html

http://www.bukowina.org.il/152512/%D7%A7%D7%99%D7%A9%D7%95%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%9D  (In Hebrew)

Yizkor book
Some of the pages of this Yizkor book "Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina"  for this shtetl and are in English.
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/mir/translations.html


Galati City and County

  
   Craftsmen's Temple in Galati - Year built: 1896
 
 http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

Including towns of Baneasa, Beresti-Tirg/Beresti, Galati, Ivesti (commune), Lestetz/Liesti/Lieste, Nicoresti, Targul, Nicoresti (commune), and Tecuci are included in the ROMSIG Galati County Research contact the Coordinator  Ellen Renck - NY  Desiree Gil DAGAG123@aol.com   

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html 


Galatz  (Galati)

ROMANIA  STATIONARY CARD 1893 UPU 5 BANI ROSA FROM JASSY TO GALATZ
Romania Stationary Card 1893 UPU 5 Bani Rosa from Jassy to Galatz
http://www.ebay.com/sch/?&_nkw=Galatz

A port on the River Danube, in Moldavia, eastern Romania, first mentioned in the 15th century. Jews first settled there at the end of the 16th century. A cemetery which has not been preserved, was probably established in 1629; another, recently restored, was established in 1774.There was a substantial Jewish Presence before WW II
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0007_0_07008.html

http://thisdayinjewishhistory.blogspot.com/2009/04/this-day-april-14-in-jewish-history.html

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/romania/galati-galati-judet.html

http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Galati

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom1_00090.html


Gura Humorului   Suceava County

  

Great Synagogue at Gura Humorului - Year built: 1860
 http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

Gura Humorului is a town located in north Romania, Suceava County in southern Bukovina. In 1857 Gura Humorului had a Jewish population of 190 souls. In that year also the Jewish cemetery was established. That cemetery was active until 1920. In 1920 the "New" cemetery was established right near the "Old" one, and it is still open today. These cemeteries (the old and the new) have about 2060 graves.
http://humora.tripod.com‏/

Gura Humorului Jewish Community
T
he aim of these pages is to provide a photographic record and to provide the burial records of the Gura Humorului Jewish cemetery (Romania), and others records from the Jewish community of that town, for the benefit of those genealogists who live some distance away and for the decedents of Gura Humorului Jewish community

http://humora.tripod.com/

If your interest is in Gura Humorului, then this is the URL  
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/guraho/gurahumo.htm


http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html

Yizkor Book
"
Geschichte Der Juden in der Bukowina" (Gura Humorului, From Volume II of History of the Jews in the Bukowina Romania/Ukraine)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania      
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 

For additional information about this region located in Bukowina, Bukowina


Hirlau  (Harlau)

Great Synagogue at Harlau Year built: 1812-1814 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0008_0_08431.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Pinkas_Romania/rom1_00111.html

Pinkas Hakehillot, Romania, vol. 1
translations.html


Iasi (Yase) Moinesti


Great Synagogue in Iasi - Year built: 1671 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

Located near the Moldavian border in northeastern Romania. This city was once the capital of one of the three principates (Moldova) prior to 1859.  At one time there were 157 synagogues, but now, only one is left and it barely gets a Minyan.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/iasi/iasi.html

This city is also considered the birthplace of the Yiddish theater.  A rustic Jewish tavern stood in the city center, facing Iasi's state theater, and in the late nineteenth century, the city's population was over a third Jewish.  Today there are only a few hundred Jews.
http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/mosteniri_ale_culturii_iudaice_03_11_09.html

Fiscal Census of the Jews of Iasi and the District of Iasi
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/iasi/records.html

Jewish Community
http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/mosteniri_ale_culturii_iudaice_03_11_09.html


Map

http://www.romaniatourism.com/iasi.html

Pogrom
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ia%C5%9Fi_pogrom


Iasi County

Coordinator for Region / District Studies is Bob Siegel   
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 


Jassy (see Iasi)


Jonava (Yanovo) 

   
   Jewish Cemetery
    http://www.tourslithuania.com/pages/tours_jewish_trail.shtml

Located in the Kovno Uyezd.  In JewishGen's ShtetlSeeker, there are Yanovo's/Janowa's in Belarus, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Poland, Romania and Russia. 

There are also many towns named Janow in Poland, including a Janow Podlaski and a Janow Lubelskie.  There is even another Yonavo in Lithuania other than the one in Kovno Uyezd - today it is called Jokavai. Ada Green offered a listing of Jonava Societies and Associations  associated with the JGSNY Cemetery Project in a message to the JewishGen Digest group   
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonava

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/lithuania/jonava.html


Kalarash (Cǎlǎrași, Tuzora; See also Calarasi above)

KALARASH (Romanian Cǎlǎrași, formerly also Tuzora), town in Bessarabia, Moldova. Jews began to settle there in the first half of the 19th century. They numbered 4,593 in 1897, forming 89% of the population
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0011_0_10617.html

Kalarasher Bessarabier Progressive Association, Landsmanshaft of Kalarash (a shtetl near Kishinev, in what was once part of Bessarabia and is now part of Moldova)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/calarasi/Einbinder.html
 


Kishinev

The Kishinev pogrom was an anti-Jewish riot that took place in Kishinev (Chişinău), then the capital of the Bessarabia province of the Russian Empire (now the capital of Moldova) on April 6-7, 1903
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kishinev_pogrom


Lipkany - (Lipkani, Lipkamya, Lipcan)  

A town located 128.8 miles N of Chisinau in Moldova.   Once located in Romania, later Bessarabia, and eventually in Russia.

Cemetery
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/conferences/BessarabiaSIGMeeting.pdf

Yizkor Book
"Lisrod U-Lesaper" (To Survive and Tell);
"Kehillot Lipkany; Sefer Zikaron" (The Community of Lipkany; Memorial Book)
http://resources.ushmm.org/hsv/source_view.php?SourceId=19163

http://www.namesnotnumbers.org/student_research_Simon%20Feldman.html

http://jewishgen.blogspot.com/2012/09/yizkor-book-update-september-2012.html


Lug (Luh)

Maramures County. To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania  
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Maramures Region including

  
 
   Vizhnitzer Klaus Temple, Sighetul Marmatiei, Maramures Cy  - Year built: 1855 

Yizkor Book Project 
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html
 

Maramures County - Coordinator of Region \ District Studies Group  is Cherie Korer 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 


Marghita

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Yizkor le-Kehillot Margareten ve-Ha-Sevivah"
(Memorial Book of the Community of Margareten and the Surrounding Region
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Mihaileni  (Michaileni, Vlădeni )


http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/botosani/BOT_CITIES.html

A town in northern Moldavia. Mihăileni was established in 1792, subsequent to the opening of a customs station between Austria and Moldavia. The town was originally named Vlădeni, but eventually the Moldavian prince Mihail Sturdza (r. 1834–1849) changed it into Mihăileni and, aiming to turn it into an important trading center, encouraged the settlement of Jews from Galicia, exempting them from taxes.

http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Mihaileni

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/10823-mihaileni


Books

An English translation of Dr. Zisu Lebel's monograph entitled
"My Dear Shtetl, Mihaileni ..."
 A first hand story about this shtetl located in the Pohontus Forest
http://www.alpas.net/uli/shtetl/Mydear1.htm
   

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/mihaileni/mih001.html


Nagyvarad

Records
1828 and 1830 List of names from the Memorial Book, Jews of Nagyvarad

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oradea/oradea.html


Nasaud, Bistrita-Nasaud Cy 

 
  
Synagogue at Nasaud, Bistrita-Nasaud Cy 
  http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Neamt County

Coordinator of Region \ District Studies Group  is Ruth Gavis 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 


Novoselytsya

On the banks of the Prut River, Novoselytsya was first mentioned in a document in 1456, having belonged to the Principality of Moldova until 1812. With the transfer of Bessarabia to the Russian Empire, its eastern half went under Russian rule, while its western half, since 1775, belonged to the Austro-Hungarian province of Bukovina.

In 1905, the local train station was inaugurated, along an existing line from the last quarter of the 19th century and which became the main transit point for cattle leather exported to the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The station became famous thanks to the famous American journalist John Reed, who started there, in 1915, his trip to Russia in order to witness the Bolshevik Revolution. With the end of World War I, the whole city became part of Romanian territory and, with World War II, of the Soviet Union.

In 1930, the city, the second largest in the Romanian province of Hotin and important commercial center, had a population of 5000 inhabitants, of whom about four-fifths were Jews. The city had several banks, a Jewish hospital, a synagogue, a post office and telegraph, a commercial high school, a court, two cinemas and an airport
http://ewigerjude.blogspot.com/2010/12/novoselytsya.html


Opriseni  (Oprischeny)  

Located near Taraseni (Terescheni and was between Czernowitz and Sereth)


Oradea


Neologic Zion Synagogue in Oradea - Year built: 1878
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

Yizkor Book
"A Tegnap Vaross; A Nagyvaradi Zsidosag Emiekkonyvelrve-etmol; Sefer Zikaron le-Yehudei Grosswardein)" (A City and Yesterday; Memorial Book to the Jews of Grosswardein)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

http://www.oradeajc.com/features_forum.htm


Orasu Nou

Formerly Ujvaros, Hungary and was in the eastern part of Szatmarmegye (approx. 1878)


Orhei (Orgeyev) Moldova

Yizkor Book
A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Orhei)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Piatra Neami

Sometimes called just Piatra, had a population of 26,303 in 1948.  It was in Bacau province and located on the Bistrita River, 175 miles north of Bucharest.  It was noted for many different types of manufacturing and was a departure point to various historic monasteries.


Pitesti 

  

Synagogue of Pitesti Year built: 1919
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Ploiesti (Polesti)

Prahova County. This is a city that is known for its oil refineries. It was bombed by the American Air force. My friend, Babe Toles' older brother was one of the Americans killed in a raid on this city. To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania   
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html

Synagogue

Great Synagogue of Ploiesti Year built: 1785 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Popricani

Located near the city of Iasi.  A mass grave, containing the bodies of about 100 Jews killed during the Holocaust was discovered in a burial pit in a forest located about 350km (220 miles) north east of Bucharest.  It is thought that the pit contains the remains of men, women and children shot in 1941 by troops of the pro-Nazi Romanian regime.  Up to 380,000 Jews are believed to have killed in Romanian-controlled territory during WW II.  This particular grave was found because of testimonies from local inhabitants who witnessed the kills.  Adrian Cioflanca, a Romanian historian, is involved in the dig.  It is the second Holocaust-era mass grave discovered in Romania since 1945.


Prahova County

Towns included are:  
Adunati, Azuga, Baba Ana, Baicoi, Balta Doamnei, Boldesti-Scaeni, Brazi, Breaza, Brebu, Busteni, Cheia, Caresu, Cheia, Cimpina, Comarnic, Cosminele, Dirvari, Draganesti, Dumbrava, Gherghita, Golgata, Gura Valdului, Intre Bisci, Izvoarele, Jugureni, Magurele, Maneciu, Manesti, Mizil, Ploesti, Plopeni, Plopu, Sinaia, Singeru, Slanic, Soimari, Starchiojd, Surani, Teisani, Urlati, Valea Calugareasca
and Valea Doftanei

Prahova County - Temporary Coordinator of Region \ District Studies Group  is Ellen Renck     
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 


Raciunesti  (Kretsnif, Kretsnif Bocicolo Mare (Romanian Byhkov) Maramures County 

Cemetery
Contact Leslie Gyi nee Feig who will provide you with instructions on how to view the site using a special password.  The site is on the  
www.MyFamilyinc.com

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html

To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania    
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 


Radauti  (Radauti-Prut, Radauts, Radautsi, Radautz, Radevitz, Radivits, Radovitch, Radovits, Radoyts)
                     
 Suceava County


Great Temple at Radauti - Year built: 1879 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

The town is situated just south of Polish Galicia region of Stanislawow and Moldova (ex-Bessarabia) borders on the border Prut River and now the northeastern part of Romania. It was one of the easternmost towns in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Radauti is, in fact, Radauti-Bucovina of northern Romania according to Alex Finkelstein Alex.Finkelstein@mail.biu.ac.il 

The territory used to be part of the Austrian Empire, but it was not in Galicia.  For additional information about this region located in Bucovina, Bukowina

Cemetery
http://www.centropa.org/?nID=60&tID=24

Database
of more than 250 graduates from the years 1885 - 1896 of the Ober-Gymnasium (secondary school) in Radautz, Bukowina (now Radauti, Romania)
http://mypage.bluewin.ch/bukowina/StudRad.html
   

In addition to the year of birth, the profession and town of residence in 1897 is given for each graduate.  Webmaster is Peter Elbau

Holocaust
There is a memorial stone for the Jewish community of Radautz with a listing of about 500 names.  The society in Israel which erected this stone in 1987, can (in many cases), put you in touch with relatives or friends who contributed the name to the project.  The complete list of names from this stone, plus an additional group of about 300 names, is now posted on the Radauti ShtetLinks site and there is a Memorial of Radauti located in Holon, Israel, listing nearly 500 names and possible links to Israel citizens 
www.radauti/radautz.html 

www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/radauti/

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html

Records
According to a knowledgeable source, there are no Bucovina records in the Romania Archives, but rather there are some in the Ukraine Archives.  This statement was challenged by Bruce Reisch in an Email: to me of 10/23/01 in which he states "In my experience, the records to be found in Romania are much more complete than those in the  Chernivetskaya oblast.'  'The records for Radauti at both locations are amazingly complete.'  'Birth and death records are available post - 1857 but marriage records are much more spotty.'

Travel
http://jewish-heritage-travel.blogspot.com/2009/08/romania-getting-ready-to-go-to-radauti.html

Yizkor Book
"Radautz in Geschichte Der Juden in Der Bukowina"

(Radautz in History of Jews in Bucovina); "Mayne Kinder  Yorn in Shotn Fun Hurbn" (My Childhood in the Shadow of the Holocaust) - 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Raducaneni

Located in the county Schneer

http://www.romanianjewish.org/en/cap2.html

http://www.arheo.ro/text/eng/istoricul_inst_eng.html


Raseiniai District Research Group

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html  


Ramnicu Vilcea

http://www.jewishgen.org/Cemetery/e-europe/rom-p-r.html


Resita, Caras-Severin Cy


Synagogue at Resita, Caras-Severin Cy - Year built: 1910 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Rimnicul Sarat

Cemetery
Remains of a Jewish cemetery has been acknowledged.


Roman

 

Roman is a mid-sized city, having the title of municipality, located in the central part of Moldavia, a traditional region of Romania. It is the Neamt County.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAJ0IGg9Y2k

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxjP508tbpU

Yizkor Book
The book will be translated from the Romanian and placed on Yizkor book site on JewishGen. We are looking for a project coordinator and translators for this project. Contact me if you are interested in helping in this project. Bob Wascou ROM-SIG Research Coordinator robertw252@aol.com


Ruscova

Yizkor Book
"Sefer le-Zikaron Kedoshei Ruskova ve-Sobias, Mehoz Marmarosh"
(Memorial Book of the Martyrs of Ruskova and Sobias, Marmarosh District)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Sadgura

Now a suburb of Chernivtsi (Czernowitz) in the Ukraine,  Sadgura had been at one time, a small town with a population that was 80% Jewish.  A great deal of information is available at this JewishGen website including photos and a trip report 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html

 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/sadgura/sadgura.html

Memoirs
on the Sadgura ShtetLinks web site recalling life in Sadgura (Bukovina) and Chotin (Ukraine) in the early 1900s.  Jack (Yankel) Becker tells the story of his early years in this 1974 oral history - interview with his daughter, Elizabeth
 becker.html


Satu Mare City and County


Temple in Satu Mare
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

Coordinator of Region \ District Studies Group  is Diane Goldman -  
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
    


Saveni

Lalomita oblast, Walachia region. Information about the area surrounding this town
http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/Shtetls/ssaveniiw.htm
 

Report by Robert Mandelbaum Rmandelbau@aol.com has been made of a contact with someone at the Town Hall.


Schwarztahl

Located about 20 km south of Gura Humorului.

Holocaust
Doug Reckmann reckmann@teleport.com has an interest in this village
http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/Data/Sighet/HolocaustSurvivorsListsSighet.txt


Sculem

Present day Sculem is in Moldova


Sfatu Georgiu

Formerly known as Sepsiszentgyorgy, Hungary now in Romania


Sibiu

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/


Sighetu Marmatiei

Located in Maramures County
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Sinaia

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Slanic

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Slatfina

The Romanians of Lower-Rina made things easier for the Jews in ghetto Slatfina, by bringing them a great deal of food.
http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Solotvina

Maramures County from Romania and Zakarpatia Region from Ukraine had a historically common development, before the establishing of a country border on the Tisa River, after the twentieth century's World Wars.


Storojinet

There is an excellent site for further information about this old Jewish village located near the Carpathian mountains.  The site offers old pictures of the Rigler family and pictures of what the town looks like now   

Haim Cohen's Storojinet Memorial Page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/storojinet/


Suceava City and County


 Great Synagogue, Suceava - Year built: 1870 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

It is the NNE of today's Romania, about 25 miles from the Ukrainian border and about 40 miles from the Moldovan border. Suceava, the town, is the head of today's Suceava Judete (country) of Romania formerly the southern part of BukovinaBukovina was an independent Crownland in the Austro-Hungarian empire.  Its northern part is the Chernivetskaya oblast, in today's Ukraine. It is 221.1 miles N of Bucharest
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/suceava.htm

Coordinator of Region \ District Studies Group  is Jerry Silverbush    
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 

Records
According to a knowledgeable source, there are no Bucovina records in the Romania Archives, but rather there are some in the Ukraine Archives.  This statement was challenged by Bruce Reisch in an Email: to me of 10/23/01 in which he states "In my experience, the records to be found in Romania are much more complete than those in the  Chernivetskaya oblast.'  'All of the Suceava Judetel Jewish records prior to approx. 1890 are to be found in the regional archive in Suceava.'  'The post ca. 1890 records are in the local town halls.'  For additional information about this region located in Bukowina,
Bukowina

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/sucava.htm


Sibiu


Great Synagogue in Sibiu - Year built: 1899
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

David Gordon dgordon@interaccess.com offers to make copies of photos he has taken of the remaining synagogue's outside from behind a locked iron gate.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0018_0_18448.html
 


Sighetu Marmatii  (Maramoros Szighet) see also Maramures above


Vizhnitzer Klaus Temple, Sighetul Marmatiei, Maramures Cy - Year built: 1855 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

Formerly known as Maramoros Szighet.  It was never a part of Galician territory, though its Hasidic leaders emigrated there from Galicia during the latter part of the 19th century.  Along with them went many Galician followers

The Jewish population today is 75.  Before the war, there were over 15,000.  Less than half survived the war and those that did either died off in the last 50 years, or they, or their descendants, move to either Israel, US or other parts of Europe.  Eli Wiesel's home in the town is now a museum. 


Books

The New York Public Library, Jewish Division, has microfilms of a Yiddish periodical published before WW II in Sighet:  "Oyfgang" published between 1933 to 1936 in Yiddish.  The Call No is *ZAN-*P721.  Note that the asterisk in the Call No. is a significant character in the NYPL catalog system and predates the widespread use of the Dewey Decimal and US Library of Congress classification systems.
http://thedagger.com/archive/romania/jews/

Cemetery
The Jewish cemetery is in decent shape and the full time caretaker lives across the street from the main gate and has the keys.  

Records
The City Hall has a very large collection of "Jewish Records" that go well back into the Austro-Hungarian empire days including Birth, Marriage, Divorce and Death records and some real estate transactions.  Other records may be found in the county seat in Baia Mare.  Much of this information was obtained from a written memo to the Jewish Gen Group by Jack Schraeter Dd.H.  Email: schraeter@lakemed.cumberland.me.us
 

Synagogue
There is one synagogue today, whereas before 1944, there were 16 temples and synagogues. 


Sinaia - Prahova County.

To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania   
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 


Slanic - Prahova County

To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania   
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 


Stefanesti

Located parallel with Dorohoi and on the Romanian/Moldavian border.  This shtetl had few Jews. 


Books

There is a monograph about Jewish life in Stefanesti called "Stefanesti: Portrait of a Romanian Shtetl" Authored by Ghitta Sternberg and published by Pergamon Press in 1984.
http://www.idee.ro/jewish_heritage2/stefanesti.html


Suchostav Region Research Group (SRRG)

Coordinator of Region \ District Studies Group  is Joan Baronberg
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 


Sziget

There were about 10,000 Jews before WW II.  The author Eli Wiesel attests that: “The Jews of Sziget didn't know what awaited them, until the last minute… no one found it necessary to inform us of this… a year after the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, we still did not know a thing concerning the Nazi plan to exterminate European Jewry”. And even if it registered on their consciousness in a vague way, it was quickly erased by virtue of the well-known “Jewish optimism”. Therefore the Jews preferred going together with their families and with “the community of Israel”, and “What will happen to the people of Israel will also happen to the individual named Israel”, as is so well-known and familiar, and as many of us experienced ourselves, on our own “skin”.
http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Talmesch - (German: Talmesch; Hungarian: Nagytalmacs; Official: Talmaciu)

More information can be found at 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Targu Mures 

  
 
Great Temple in Targu Mures - Year built: 1899-1900
 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Tarteln   (German: Tarteln; Hungarian: Kisprazsmar; Official: Toarcla)

More information can be found at   
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 


Tartlau (German: Tartlau; Hungarian: Prazsmar; Official: Prejmer)

More information can be found at 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Taterloch   (German: Taterloch; Hungarian: Felsotatarlaka; Official Tatirlaua)

More information can be found at 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Tatsch - (German: Tatsch; Hungarian: Tacs; Official: Tonciu)

More information can be found at  
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Tekendorf - (German: Tekendorf; Hungarian: Teke; Official: Teaca)

More information can be found at 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Temisvar

Cemetery
There is a cemetery located behind the Temple

http://www.crwflags.com/fotw/Flags/ro-timis.html


Thalheim - (German: Thalheim; Hungarian: Dolmany; Official: Daia)

More information can be found at  
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Timisoara

                            
Josefin Temple, Timisoara - Year built: 1910       Citadel Synagogue, Timisoara - Year built 1864
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403

http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig/


Tisa

Located in Maramures County. To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania   
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Tobsdorf - (German: Tobsdorf; Hungarian: Tablas; Official: Dupus)

More information can be found at 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Toplita, Harghita Cy 

      

New Synagogue at Toplita, Harghita Cy - Year built: 1950
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Tornen (German Tornen; Hungarian: Pokafalva; Official: Pauca)

More information can be found at 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Transnistria

Translated it means the land beyond the Nistru (Dnestr River), a province located in southwestern Ukraine and between the Dnestr and the southern Buh.  

Before WWII, there were hundreds of shtetls, including Mogilev.  Much of the area was in the old Podolia district, Luchynets, Yaltashkiv and Bar

Holocaust
Mogilev
and Bar were larger cities and were the sites of mass killings by the Nazis and their Romanian allies.  

Jews from both Bucovina and Bessarabia were forced across the Dnestr to Transnistria and then murdered.  Referenced in "Atlas of the Holocaust" and authored by Sir Martin Gilbert, describes the horrible details of the murder of an estimated 300,000 Bucovina and Bessarabien Jews in Transnistria

Transnistria Death List
A link to a list of victims who died in Transnistria, Romania 


Trappold - (German: Trappold; Hungarian: Apold; Official: Apold)

         
15 km south of Sighisoara

More information can be found at
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Treppen - (German: Treppen; Hungarian: Szasztorpeny; Official: Tarpiu)

14 km north of Bistrita - more information can be found at
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Tschippendorf - (German: Tschippendorf: Hungarian: Csepany; Official: Cepari)

Located 7 km west of Tarpiu - more information can be found at http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html 


Tulcea

  

Temple at Tulcea Year built: 1888 
http://romanianjewish.org/?page_id=1403


Turnu Severin  (Drobeta Turnu Severin)


    Jewish children, Turnu Severin, early 1900's. Beit Hatefutsoth, the Visual Documentation Center

The Jewish community of Turnu Severin, a town today called Drobeta Turnu Severin, flourished mainly during the late decades of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. In 1899, the number of Jews in Turnu Severin reached its high of 899 individuals constituting almost five percent of the town's general population. Typically for a Danubian port town at the time, Turnu Severin, which was situated before WW1 at the western most part of Romania, harbored various nationalities: Jews made up the fourth largest ethnic group, after Romanians, Germans, and Serbs, in a town that also sheltered small Greek, Armenian, Bulgarian, and Turkish communities.


Turulung   (Turterebes

Located northeast  of Satu Mare and very close to the Ukrainian border. When it was in the Tiszntuli district of Ugocsa county, it was known as Turterebes, Hungary. 


Ugocsa County

A small county between Bereg and Maramaros and quite far from Arad county.


Ungersdorf - (German: Ungersdorf; Hungarian: Sajomagyaros; Official: Sieu Magherus)

Located 4 km northwest of Crainimat and west of Bistrita
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Unterporumbach  (German: Unterporumbach; Hungarian: Alsoporumbak; Official: Porumbacu de Jos)

Located 7 km northeast of Avrig - more information can be found at http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html 


Urwegen - (German: Urwegen; Hungarian: Szaszorbo; Official: Girbova)

Located west of Miercurea Sibiului and 23 km south of Sebes) more information can be found at
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Urziceni


Velykiv Bychkiv (Ukrainian Bychkov) Maramures County

To see which county your shtetl was in, check the searchable database at The Shtetls of Romania  
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/regions.html
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html


Vicovu de Sus

Ruth Gruber has written a great deal about this small village located near Radauti.  It is still common, in this area, to see horses and carts as a means of transportation.
http://jewish-heritage-travel.blogspot.com/2009/09/romania-family-history.html


Viktoriastadt  (German: Viktoriastadt; Official: Orasul Victoria)

Located 7 km south of Ucea and southwest of Fagaras - more information can be found at
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Waldhutten  (German: Waldhutten; Hungarian: Valthid; Official: Valchid)

Located 5 km north of Copsa mare and south of Dumbravennihttp://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html 


Wallendorf  (German: Wallendorf; Hungarian: Aldorf; Official: Unirea, Aldorf)

A suburb of Bistrita
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Waltersdorf (German: Waltersdorf; Hungarian: Kisdemeter; Official: Dumitrita)

Located 17 km southeast of Bistrita
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Wassid ( German: Wassid; Hungarian: Szaszveszod; Official: Veseud)

Located 13 km southeast of Seica Mare 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Weidenbach (German: Weidenbach; Hungarian: Vidombak; Official: Ghimbav)

A suburb of Brasov
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Weilau  (German: Weilau; Hungarian: Vajola; Official: Uila)

Located 22 km north of Reghin
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Weingartskirchen (German: Weingartskirchen; Hungarian: Vingard; Official: Vingard)

Located 20 km east of Sebes 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Weisskirch - (German Weißkirch; Hungarian: Kisfeheregyhaz; Official Albestii Bistritei)

Located south of Bistrita 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Weißkirch (German: Weißirch; Hungarian: Feheregyhaza; Official: Albestii)

Located 4 km east of Sighisoara 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Werd (German: Werd; Hungarian: Verd; Official: Vard)

Located 4 km south of Agnita  
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Wermesch (German: Wermesch; Hungarian: Vermes; Official: Vermes)

Located 2 km from Lechinta
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Windau - (German: Windau; Hungarian: Vinda; Official: Ghinda)

Located 7 km east of and now part of Bistrita  http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html 


Winz  (German: Winz, Unterwinz; Hungarian: Alvinc; Official: Vintu de Jos)

Located 10 km northwest of Sebes
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Wisho (Lower)

Residents of Lower-Wisho, brought food to the ghetto, their own and what was taken from the Jews, this despite the beatings they received at the hands of the gendarmes for doing so.
http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz15.htm


Wolkendorf  (German: Wolkendorf; Hungarian: Szaszvolkany, Volkany; Official: Vulcan)

Located 5 km west of Cristian and 8 km south of Codlea  http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html 


Wölz (German: Wölz; Hungarian: Volc, Wölc; Official: Velt)

Located north of Medias  
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Wurmloch (German: Wurmloch; Hungarian: Nagybaromlak; Official: Valea Viilor, Vorumloc)

Located 7 km northwest of Motis and 5 km south of Copsa Mica   
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Yedintsy  (Yednitz, Yedinetz, Edineti)

Located in Briceni County, Moldova. Yednitz is located in North West Bessarabia and controls the crossroads of the Khotin, Beltz and Soroka Districts. During the period between the two world wars, the population was approximately 12 - 13,000, about half of them Jews.  It is apparent that as early as 1850, Yednitz was home to an important Jewish settlement.  Most Jews came from Podolia and Russia.  Many also came from neighboring villages. 

http://www.yorav.co.il/clali/ENGLISH/YEDINITZ.htm

http://yedintsy.homestead.com/

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/Romania.html

Cemetery
An architectural map has been obtained of one of the two Washington Cemetery sections listing the names of deceased buried there. At some point the information presented on this map will be posted on the proposed website. It is a goal to eventually record all the names of loved ones buried among the three cemetery sections and to make these available to all fellow researchers. Given time the information recorded on each stone could be available memorializing each individual as the family intended
http://boards.ancestry.com/topics.ethnic.jewish.jewish-american/159/mb.ashx

Travel Blog    Traveling Roots
http://moldovaimpressions.blogspot.com/2008/11/yedinitz-part-i.html

http://moldovaimpressions.blogspot.com/2008/11/yedinitz-part-ii-discovering-more-about.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Yedintsy/Yedinits.html


Zeiden (German: Zeiden; Hungarian: Feketehalom; Official: Codlea)

Located 14 km west of Brasov 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Zendersch  (German: Zendersch; Hungarian: Szenaverös; Official: Senereus)

Located 7 km from Filitelnic 
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Zied (German: Zied; Hungarian: Vesszöd; Official: Veseud)

Located 8 km south of Agnita
http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html
 


Zuckmantel  (German: Zuckmantel; Hungarian; Cikmantor; Official: Tigmandru)

Located 8 km south of Balauseri and 4 km north of Nades  http://www.genealogienetz.de/gene/reg/ESE/7burg_tz.html 

more to come ...
 


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