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Slovakia has a population of almost 5.4 million people living in an area bounded by Poland,  Czech Republic, Hungary and UkraineSlovak was a minority nationality in the Northern Counties (Upland) of Hungary that were carved of Hungary after WW I and became the Slovak components of Czechoslovakia, until Hitler broke Czechoslovakia up (Munich Agreement), incorporating Sudetenland into Germany, making Bohemia, Moravia into Protectorate, and Slovakia an independent state.

Prior to WW II, there were some 150,000 Jews living in Slovakia.   The Slovakian government paid the Germans 500 marks per head for the 'privilege' of deporting their Jewish citizens to Nazi death camps. Only 25,000 survived. Most of those today are over 70 and many have intermarried, so the future of these Jews is pretty bleak.  In 2002, there are approximately 4.000 Jews left - mostly elderly.

The country has been settled by (or ruled by) Celts, Romans, Slavic tribes, Magyars, Tartars, Turks and Habsburgs, Germans and Soviets and became a country in 1993 after the so-called "Velvet Divorce" from the Czech Republic.

The current ethnic composition of Slovakia is:  85.8% Slovak, 9.7% Hungarian, 1.7% Roma/Gypsy, 0.8% Czech, 0.4% Rusyn and 0.2% Ukrainian

Fero Alexander is Executive Director of Slovakia's Central Union of Jewish Religious Communities

The Slovak Republic (F.A.Q. Anthem, Maps, etc.); Slovakian History; Culture and Society
http://www.slovakia.org/


"Dictionary of all Villages in Slovakia"
Complete historic data and photos with all the old and new names for all villages in current Slovakia from their first ever mention in written records.  The three volumes are in Slovak and are a valuable tool to any serious genealogist.  Published by the Slovak Academy of Science in 1977.  Volume I is 526 pages; Volume II is 517 pages and Volume III is 532 pages.  You might try locating the set at the library or try the following site
http://slovakheritage.org/Shopping/Books/vlastslovnik.htm
 


"The Problem of the Immigrant"
Authored by James Davenport Whelpley and published in London by Chapman & Hall Ltd in 1905.  Chapter 14 - Austria-Hungary features an English translation of the Hungarian Emigration Law of 1903. Use this site to research in Slovakia.
http://www.iarelative.com/hung1903/
  


"Vital Statistic Records in the Slovakian Archives"
Information about Avotaynu microfiche form of these Jewish vital statistical records can be found at
http://www.avotaynu.com/microf.htm
 


General
Slovakian
Genealogy Information


http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/nazioccupation/hlinka.html

Before WW II, there were some 100,000 to 150,000 Jews living in the country, but only 25,000 survived the Holocaust.  All but 282 of the Jews in death camps were killed.  A document was recently found that broke the wartime deportation agreement between the Germans and the Nazi-puppet Slovak state for the deportation of the Jews in 1942.  Slovakia was the only sovereign nation in wartime Europe willing to pay for the removal of its Jews.  The money came from the stolen Jewish property.

Today, most of Slovakia's 4,000 to 6,000 Jews live in the capital of Slovakia, Bratislava and are mostly over 65 years old.  There are newly reopened Talmud Torahs in both Bratislava and Kosice -- the home of most Slovak Jewish youth.

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/slovakia.html

693 identified Jewish cemeteries have been preserved in Slovakia.  
heritage.org/slovakia-jewish-cemeteries.html


Application forms for Slovak Vital Records

http://www.iarelative.com/slovakia.htm  
or by mail to the Kosice City Archives:
Archiv Mesta Kosic,
040 01 Kosice,
Kovacska ul. c. 20/I, Slovak Republic
http://www.slovakia.culturalprofiles.net/?id=3611

Other archives to contact:

Statny Oblastny Archiv v Nitre
951 12 Ivanka pri Nitre
Novozamocka ul c. 273
Slovak
http://www.geni.sk/statny-okresny-archiv-v-nitre/

http://www.genealogy-heraldry.sk/eng/adr.html

State Archives in Bratislava
Contact for records before 1900
http://www.slovakia.culturalprofiles.net/?id=3574

National Archives
In Bratislava. 
http://www.civil.gov.sk/snarchiv/
 


Arva megye 1785

Gary Luke feraltek@zeta.org.au has a list of fixed surnames taken on by Jews in Arva Megye of Hungary in 1785.  The first few pages appear to be conditions of residency in Latin and in old Germanic handwriting.  The area borders on Slovakia and Poland and is south of Krakow.  Most of the district is now in Slovakia, with a small part in Poland.  The main towns are Trstena, Dolny Kubin and Manestovo.
http://www.hungarianvillagefinder.com/HVFIndex2/04_ARVA.html


Balkan Jews


http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com/2011/03/new-york-balkan-jewish-life-exhibit.html


Cemeteries (Jewish) in Eastern Slovakia

http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/

Slovakia cemetery records on the Cemetery.sk site (Language: English, Slovak)  Description of this source: This site contains 140,000 records of persons buried in 1500+ cemeteries in Slovakia  

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/places/michalovce

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/sources/slovakia_cemetery_records
_on_the_cemetery.sk_site


The Central Union of Jewish Religious Communities

Fero Alexander is the executive chairman.
http://www.swissbankclaims.com/pdfs_eng/CenUnOfJewishRelComm
InSloRepub.pdf


East European Genealogical Society

http://www.eegsociety.org/Home.aspx


Electronic Embassy

The Electronic Embassy Web site turned seventeen years old on May 1, 2012. When the site was launched, only two of Washington's foreign embassies were on the Web.  Now, most of the embassies have homes on the Internet to complement their addresses on Embassy Row. Business Directories allows companies serving the international community, and those working, living, and traveling http://www.embassy.org/


Embassy of the Slovak Republic

2201Wisconsin Ave. NW
Suite 250
Washington, D.C. 20007, USA
Phone: (202) 965 5166      
Email: : svkemb@concentric.net

http://www.slovakemb.com

http://www.embassy.org/


Genealogical research in the lands of the former  Austro-Hungarian Monarchy

A Guide to Archives and Parish-Registers
http://ihff.nwy.at/hpmain.htm
  

http://www.shon.150m.com/czechhtm.htm


Holocaust      Holocaust

Jews were shipped off to the concentration camps of Germany for extermination. However, families in villages just like Litmanova, did harbor many Jewish children during the war, only to encounter intense hostility from fellow villagers after the war for threatening the security of the entire village by their acts of generosity.


Hungarian SIG

www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/


International Jewish Cemetery Project in Slovakia 

Slovak Genealogical-Heraldic Society
Nám. J. C. Hronského 1,
036 01 Martin,
Slovakia,
Europe
Phone: 421-43-4131267,
Fax: 421-43-4133188
Email: : genealogy@snk.sk
http://www.genealogy-heraldry.sk

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/index.html

http://www.kosherdelight.com/Slovakia_Jewish_Cemeteries.shtml


Jewish Communities

Central Union of Jewish Religious Communities in Slovakia
Bratislava 81447, Slovakia
http://www.jewish-heritage-europe.eu/country/slovakia/slovakia.htm

http://www.jewishcom.be/FR/links.html

http://www.swissbankclaims.com/pdfs_eng/CenUnOfJewishRelComm
InSloRepub.pdf


Jewish Federation of Slovakia

http://www.jewishfederations.org/IR/community-directory.aspx?id
=165&category=200

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/slovakia.html


Jewish Genealogy from Slovakia

Not in English
http://www.chaverim.sk/

http://www.first-search.net/chaverim.sk.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lipany/

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/humenne/humenne.htm


Jewish Heritage film in Slovakia

A film by Yuri Dojc on Jewish heritage in rural Slovakia.  Dojc is a Jewish-Slovakian émigré, child of Holocaust survivors.   There are some interviews with Holocaust survivors who stayed in Slovakia.  
http://www.lastfolio.com/


  Maps

The current borders and an offer to provide you with information and photos of the towns of interest
http://www.slovakheritage.org/Unesco/spispodhr.htm

http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/europe/sk.htm

http://www.slovakia.org/maps.htm

Map of Slovakia
http://www.lonelyplanet.com/maps/europe/slovakia/

Open Street Maps
The crowd-sourced mapping project OpenStreetMap has amassed a million contributors since its inception in 2005 and, according to navigation app maker Skobbler, boasts greater accuracy in England, Russia and Germany than rivals such as Google Maps.  I tried the site and found an accurate drawing of my father's ancestral town Tal'ne, Ukraine.  Almost every country is available as is most towns
http://openstreetmap.org

Picture tour around Slovakia
http://slovakia.eunet.sk/slovakia/geo.asp
 


Museum of The Slovak National Uprising in Banska Bystrica, Slovakia

"The Tragedy of Jewish Community of Medzilaborce County"
Manager of this project is Jan Hlavinka
j_hlavinka@orangemail.sk 
http://www.slovakia.culturalprofiles.net/?id=3899


Photographic Service

Find photograph any locality in Slovakia
http://swpp.ws/Slovakia_photographers/

http://www.mfoto.sk/en/promotional-and-business-images/


Research - Slovakian Genealogy

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/places/michalovce

Vladimir Bohinc, Professional Genealogist,
KONEKTA s.r.o.,
Dukelska 11, Nove Mesto n.V.,
Slovak Republic
Tel/Fax; xx421 32 7710 375
Email: :
konekta@nm.psg.sk

http://www.konekta.sk  

Slovakia Websites
https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Slovakia_Websites


Search Engines for Slovakia

http://www.philb.com/cse/slovakia.htm

http://www.netmasters.co.uk/european_search_engines/slovakia.shtml

http://www.iarelative.com/search/sea0800a.htm


Slovak Jewish Heritage Route

A project to safeguard Jewish treasures in Slovakia has been initiated as written by Ruth Ellen Gruber in an article printed in the April/May 2013 issue of Hadassah magazine.  More than 100 synagogue buildings and nearly 700 Jewish cemeteries remain scattered in a country only twice the size of New Hampshire.  The total Jewish population is estimated at about 3,000. the Heritage Route is a tourist and educational trail that links two dozen key sites in all eight regions of the country - synagogues and Jewish cemeteries as well as Jewish museums and Holocaust memorials
http://www.hadassahmagazine.org/site/apps/nlnet/content.aspx?c=twI6LmN7IzF&b=6725377&ct=13077875


Slovakian SIG

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wacsig/

Yad Vashem started getting lists of names of Slovak Jews who perished during WW2. These lists are assembled by different organizations only now. One is the "Hiding Child project" in Kosice.
http://www.cjh.org/pdfs/Czech-Slovak.pdf

Holocaust
Yad Vashem
has a list of transport no 21 from Slovakia to Lublin on May 5th,1942

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stropkov1/str006.html

http://www.recognitionscience.com/cgv/reconstructing2.htm

http://www.judymeschel.com/coshtrace.htm


Slavophilia

A comprehensive guide to Internet resources on Russia and Central/Eastern Europe 
http://www.czechia.net/


Slovak Jewish Heritage

www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org

http://www.slovakheritage.org/Unesco/spispodhr.htm

http://www.czech.cz/


Slovak Societies and Organizations

http://www.progenealogists.com/slovakia/organizations.htm

http://ask.reference.com/web?q=Spisske%20Podhradie&l=dir&qsrc=2891&o=10616


Slovak Surnames

Over 14,800 surnames being researched  -  This Eastern Slovakia, Slovak and Carpatho-Rusyn Genealogical Research Page offers tools, resources and information to help search Slovak or Carpatho-Rusyn family history and ancestry.  Some Jewish names are represented.  

There also many links to a wealth of information on the area now known as Slovakia including a pictorial tour of the country and a list of towns and Villages in the country. 
http://www.iarelatives.com/search/p_q.htm
 

http://www.iarelative.com/search/index.html

http://slovakpride.homestead.com/


Synagogue Tour of Several Slovakian Synagogues

Narration in Hebrew and English
http://www.guyshachar.com/pps_dl.htm

http://www.slovak-republic.org/

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/our_publications.html


Translation Service

A commercial site offering many language translating programs
http://www.worldlanguage.com
 

Translating Services - Languages

LingvoSoft Dictionary English <-> Yiddish for Windows  LingvoSoft Dictionary software English <->
Yiddish for Windows - 400,000 words

 

 With this LingvoSoft smart dictionary software on your computer, you can easily switch between English and Yiddish, (or any one of many other languages) for prompt translations of 400,000 words both ways! Download Free Trial now

Just in case you didn't think of it, contact a nearby university or college's foreign language department.  They may offer to write letters and translate letters into English.  A nominal fee is usually charged.


UNESCO World Heritage Site

http://www.slovakheritage.org/Unesco/spispodhr.htm

http://searchatlas.centrum.cz/index.php?from=41&q=spisske+
podhradie&sec=mix&offset=0


Yizkor Books

http://www.ehow.com/how_6175342_out-slovak-ancestors-jewish.html

http://www.ibiblio.org/yiddish/LOC/ds135-c96locbib.html


Slovak Cities
and Towns
                                        
 
 

The number after the name below of the town indicates the approximate number of extant headstones in the town cemetery. 

Jewish Communities in Slovakia
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/Slo065.html   

Okres - the present administrative subdivision name

The word has about the same meaning as 'district' or 'county' in English.  It is the same word and meaning in both the Czech and Slovak Republics. Check out this site
http://carpatho-rusyn.org/villages.htm

To locate records for Slovakia, knowing the village/town name, go to the LDS web site
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/
FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp

For a list of 'Jewish Religious' towns and cities in alphabetical order and with the German and Hungarian name of the city
 

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0001
_0_00815.html


A List of Genealogy Internet sites of Slovak cities and places

http://www.svu2000.org/publications/genealogy/c5gd1list5.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_and_towns_in_Slovakia

http://www.fallingrain.com/world/LO/

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/slovakia.html

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_
0001_0_00815.html


Alistal  (Slov. Dolny Stal, today Hrobonovo; Heb. אלישטאבא, העלישטאבא)

A village in Slovakia, near Bratislava. A community was established at Alistál in the 14th century by Jews from Bohemia and Moravia, who exported horses from the nearby royal stables. A synagogue was built in 1579. A community is mentioned again in records of 1780. Jews without residential rights in Pressburg (Bratislava) were enabled to live in Alistál under royal protection. In 1929 the Jewish population in Alistál and environs numbered 259; approximately half were occupied in agriculture. The community came to an end during World War 
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0001_
0_00815.html


Banska / Bystrica

Banska Bystrica SNP Square.jpg

Banska Bystrica was a mining town and settled partially by ethnic Germans, Jews were not permitted to live there until 1858. The Jewish congregation was established in 1868. The congregation chose the *Neolog (reform) rite. After World War I, Jews moved to the town from the neighboring village of Radvan, where a congregation had existed for about 100 years, and established an Orthodox congregation.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0003
_0_01981.html

Population 85,000. Banská Bystrica (Slovak pronunciation; German: Neusohl;
Hungarian:
Besztercebánya) is a city in central Slovakia located on the Hron River in a long and wide valley encircled by the mountain chains of the Low Tatras, the Veľká Fatra, and the Kremnica Mountains. With 78 327 inhabitants, Banská Bystrica is the sixth most populous municipality in Slovakia. The present town was founded by German settlers, however it was built upon a former Slavic settlement. It obtained the municipal privileges of a free royal town of the Kingdom of Hungary in 1255. The copper mining town acquired its present picturesque look in the Late Middle Ages when the prosperous burghers built its central churches, mansions, and fortifications. It is the capital of the kraj (Banská Bystrica Region) and the okres (Banská Bystrica District). It is also the home of Matej Bel University. As a historical city with an easy access to the surrounding mountains, Banská Bystrica is a popular winter and summer tourist destination
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bansk%C3%A1_Bystrica

http://www.slovakia.org/banska.htm

http://eng.banskabystrica.sk/

Cemetery
 


Bardejov

  

Bardejov is located near the Slovak - Polish border, about 140 km from Cracow. The first synagogue outside the city was completed in the early XIX century, the larger one in Neo-Gothic style was consecrated in 1830. Bardejov was a center of Hasidism and a community maintained a cheder, Talmud Torah, and yeshiva. Before World War II, more than 4,000 Jews lived in Bardejov. Nearly the entire community was exterminated during the Holocaust in Auschwitz-Birkenau  Lublin district
http://www.jewish-guide.pl/slovakia/40

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0003
_0_02030.html

http://www.bardejov.org

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bardejov

http://suburbium.virtuality.sk/

Cemetery
http://bardejov.org/cemetery_hm/cemetery_hm.html

http://bardejovjewishpreservationcommittee.org/cemetery_hm/cemetery
_restoration.html
 

Synagogue
There is a nine-bay synagogue that has been preserved in this town.
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html  

Yizkor Books
http://www.yivoinstitute.org/index.php?tid=142&aid=367


Benatina - 25

Cemetery
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/
 

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/benatina.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/Slovak%20Resources%20Guide%20Rev.pdf

http://spectator.sme.sk/articles/view/5107/1/ 


Benkovce

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/benkovce.html

http://www.search.com/reference/Benkovce

Deportation List
http://haygenealogy.com/nagy/images/varannodeportations.html


Besa - 14


Books  
             

"Who saved Jews in WW II Deportation List"
http://haygenealogy.com/nagy/images/varannodeportations.html 

Cemetery
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/ 


Biel - 50

History

http://www.centropa.org/?nID=52&countryID=182

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Slovakia

http://www.traveljournals.net/explore/slovakia/map/m1253027/biel.html

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town and is located 4 miles East of Bratislava. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/biel.html  


Borsa - 3

History
http://marvaoguide.com/index.php/Slovakia/Brief-History-of-Slovakia.html

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.haruth.com/JewsSlovakia.html


Bratislava (Pressburg)

Bratislava in the Slovak Republic

http://slovakrepublic.ca/bratislava/bratislavaslovakia.html

The capital city of Slovakia with a population of 441,500 - See Pressburg and the main seat of Jewish life in Slovakia as well as the only really viable Jewish community in Slovakia. It is situated near the foothills of the Carpathian Mountains, straddling the Danube river.  It is the country's largest city and it became part of the Great Moravian Empire around the year 900 AD.  It is located in Central Europe and is a 20 minute train trip from Prague or a 50 minute cab ride from Vienna.

In the town's main square is the centuries old Town Hall with a clock tower, and around the square itself, you can enjoy several of the rather whimsical metal statues including a Napoleonic army soldier sprawling on a bench, a photographer with a box camera and called "Cumil" of a bronze man poking his head and part of his torso out of a manhole.

It was then brought into the Hungarian Kingdom at the end of the 10th century, and finally became part of the Czechoslovak Republic.  Following the break-up of Czechoslovakia, it became the capital of the Slovak Republic.  It is an industrial center and the largest wine-growing community of the region.

http://knowlescollection.blogspot.com/2013_03_01_archive.html

http://www.jewish-guide.pl/slovakia/41

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/slovakia.html

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0004
_0_03454.html

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

http://travel.spectator.sme.sk/reactions.php?id_article=278

Cemetery
A unique subterranean burial complex  where the Orthodox Rabbi Chatam Sofer, is interred
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ckaqy7bNHOE

http://chatamsofer.sk

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/bratislava.html

Jewish Community Museum of Culture
It is located inside of the Bratislava's Heydukova Street synagogue
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/jewish-museum-bratislava.html

The Museum of Jewish Culture
A branch of the Slovak National Museum and is at Zidovska 17, the only buildings remaining in Bratislav's historic Jewish quarter.
http://www.snm.sk

Slovak National Gallery
http://www.visitslovakia.com/slovak-national-gallery/


Synagogues

There are several synagogues within the city and there is a unique, subterranean burial complex, where the influential 19th century sage Rabbi Moshe Schreiber, known as the Chatam Sofer, is buried.  One synagogue was designed by
architect Artur Szalatnai-Slatinský
http://jewish-heritage-travel.blogspot.com/2009_03_01_archive.html

http://www.synagogue.sk/

http://marvaoguide.com/index.php/Slovakia/Bratislava.html

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Brezovica - 50

http://www.jewish-guide.pl/slovakia/40

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Budkovce - 52

http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/fhl_update_june_2004.htm 

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://haygenealogy.com/nagy/images/varannodeportations.html

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/index.html

Holocaust
Auschwitz Death Certificates: Names beginning with H
http://houston.indymedia.org/print.php?id=56664


Bystre nad Toplou - 50

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgs.org/cemetery/slovakia/bystre-nad-toplou.html

http://haygenealogy.com/nagy/images/varannobook.html

http://www.zchor.org/czechak.htm


Cana - 37

 
 
http://www.terminartors.com/artworkprofile/Vermeyen_Jan_ Cornelisz.-The_Marriage_at_Cana    

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Czech_and_Slovak_Jews

Cemetery
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/
 


Casta

The village of Casta is located in the Pezinok district and is about 33 km from Bratislava. Jews have lived there from the 1700s to the 1900s.
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/casta/index.html


Cejkov - 10 to 20

Cejkov (Hungarian: Céke) is a village and municipality in the Trebišov District in the Košice Region of eastern Slovakia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cejkov

Cemetery
A
Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Certizne - 63

Cemetery
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/

Synagogue 
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/


Chmelov - 48

Cemetery
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/
 


Davidov

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Dlhe Klcovo - 8 

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town.  


Dolni Kubin  (Slovak Dolný Kubin; Hung. Alsókubin)

A town in N. Slovakia, now Slovak Republic. According to existing documentation, Jews arrived in the city of
Dolni Kubin, and in the Orava region, by the beginning of the 18th century, though it can be assumed that they were in the area earlier.

Moravian Jews were the pioneers of Jewish settlement in the entire region of northern upper Hungary, from Čadca to Bardejov.*Holešov Jewry, in northern Moravia, settled in many Jewish cities of this region, including
Dolni
Kubin in 1710. During their initial years in the city, the Jews rented houses from local inhabitants and were quick to exploit the city's strategic location between Cracow and Vienna for business purposes. In 1775 the Jews built their first synagogue. They also acquired land for a cemetery
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0005
_0_05308.html


Dunajska Streda

A town located on the largest island of the Danube River in S.W. Slovakia, now Slovak Republic. Towns and villages of the region had dense Jewish populations and most were supervised by the Dunajska Streda rabbinate
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0006
_0_05464.html


Galanta

A town in N.W. Slovakia. Until 1992 Czechoslovak Republic, since Slovak Republic. Jews started to settle in Galanta by the end of the 17th century. The earliest document is from 1729, when Count Ferdinand Eszterhazy granted the Jewish community a room for prayer and ground for a cemetery. In 1830, 556 Jews lived in Galanta (31.2% of the total); in 1840 there were 430; and in 1850 there were 670 Jews in the town. In 1880 they numbered 714 (32.8%) and in 1900 there were 937. The second Czechoslovak census of 1930 reported 1,274 Jews
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0007
_0_07001.html


Giraltovce (Giralt)

 

I found an excellent and informative web site for this shtetl and the surrounding area, including photos and a map. Includes also, names of families living in and around the area - even their house location within the shtetl.  If you can read Slovakian language, great, but if not there are several other choices at the top left of the home page including English.
http://www.zeleznik.sk/Odkazy/holokaust.htm

Special Interest Group
There are Regional Special Interest Groups that have Slovakia information and links.  The site includes links to Bohemia-Moravia SIG, Denmark SIG, German-Jewish SIG, Hungary SIG and Stammbaum - German SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html


Hanusovce nad Toplou - 80

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Hlohovec  (Hung. Galgóc; Ger. Freistadtl, Freistadt; in popular Slovak Fraštak)

A town in W. Slovakia, until 1992 Czechoslovak Republic, then Slovak Republic. The first Jews appeared in Hlohovec with the Romans. During the 9th-century Great Moravian Empire, Jews may have lived in the location of present Hlohovec. Since then, Germans who settled in the area bore hatred toward Jews, and in the 13th century Jews had to wear red markings on their clothes. After refusing to convert to Christianity, the Jews of the Hungarian kingdom were expelled in 1360. Before then, they could live in any part of the town. Upon their return four years after the expulsion, they were relegated to one "Jewish" street. In 1514 they were expelled again, during the peasant revolt. Hlohovec was located next to an important bridge over the river Váh; from the 15th to the 18th century, Jews collected the tax for crossing the bridge on behalf of the royal treasury
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0009_
0_09072.html


Humenne - 350 (Humenné, Eperjes)

Located in eastern Slovakia and about 70 km (45 miles) east of Presov (formerly Eperjesuntil 1992 Czechoslovak Republic, then Slovak Republic. Humenné is situated on the highway leading from Poland to wine-growing regions in eastern Hungary. Jewish tradesmen frequented this highway. The first record of Jewish presence in the town is from 1743. There were no guilds in Humenné, and nobody intervened in the activity of Jewish businessmen. Although the community was founded in 1809, the Hevra Kadisha existed from 1786, and the oldest tombstone dates from 1772. Humenné attracted Jewish settlers; in particular, an influx of Jews from Poland was evident in the 19th century. In 1830/35 there were 666 Jews in Humenné; in 1857 there were 1,020; and in 1880 there were 1,280. In 1910 the number reached 1,570 (34.8%). The first Czechoslovak census of 1921 reported 1,254; in 1930 there were 2,197. In 1940, on the eve of the deportations, 2,172 Jews lived in Humenné
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0009
_0_09306.html


Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 

Records
Bobby Furst states that "I have digital photos of pages from birth, marriage, deaths from this town."  These books have not been microfilmed by the LDS."

Regional Special Interest Groups
Have Slovakia information and links.  The site includes links to Bohemia-Moravia SIG, Denmark SIG, German-Jewish SIG, Hungary SIG and Stammbaum - German SIG at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html


Huncovce  (Ger. Hunsdorf; Hg. Hunfalu)

A village in N.E. Slovakia; until 1992 Czechoslovak Republic, since then Slovak Republic, seat of a famous yeshiva. It is located in the region of Spiš (Ger. Zips, Hg. Szepes), settled densely by Germans (Schwabes). The inhabitants were hostile to Jews and would not permit them to live in the region's towns. Huncovce, a village, served as a ghetto, where Jews would return in the evenings when the city gates closed. The first Jews must have settled in Huncovce in the 17th century, and there is evidence of their presence in the 18th century. The first rabbi, Benjamin Sinai, died in 1708. From the outset, Huncovce suffered from internal migration, so when *Liptovský Mikulaš was settled by Jews at the beginning of the 18th century, 22 families moved there from Huncovce. When Jews received freedom of settlement in Hungary in 1840, they moved to neighboring towns. This repeated itself after 1867, when Jews gained equality in the country. In the Czechoslovak Republic, migration spelled disaster to the community
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0009
_0_09316.html

Synagogue
There is a neo-Classical synagogue
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Hunfalu (Huncovce, Hunsdorf)

Located near Kosice
http://feefhs.org/MF/SK/SK-JEW1.HTML

http://showme.physics.drexel.edu/thury/Kassai_minjen.html


Jablon - 18

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/jablon-zemplen.html

http://genforum.genealogy.com/eichler/messages/20.html

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SLOVAK-ROOTS/message/6641


Jaromnice - 20

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

http://www.haruth.com/JewsSlovakia.html


Jasov - 10

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/jasov.html

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/sources/slovakia_cemetery_records
_on_the_cemetery.sk_site
 

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/places/jasov


Jenkovce - 30

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 

http://www.haruth.com/JewsSlovakia.html

http://himebaugh.com/jane/hustoles/hustoles.pdf


Kcynia

The Jewish cemetery in Kcynia was established in 18th century. It is located on Wagrowiecka St. The area is not fenced; there are no fragments of Matzevot left.


Kecerovce - 25

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/kecerovce.html

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/places/kecerovce_%5Bkecerovske
_peklany%5D
 


Kezmarok - 300 

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/kezmarok/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ke%C5%BEmarok

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/kezmarok.html


Kolbasov - 40

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/kolbasov.html

http://www.iabsi.com/gen/public/settlements/Sl_Kolbasov.htm

http://web.mac.com/lmort/Vivian_Kahn_Family_Website/Kohn_Family.html


Komarno

Evidence shows that there were Jews in Komárno in the Middle Ages, but modern Jewish settlement began only in the eighteenth century. Its fastest growth came with the rapid development of Komárno into an important urban center. In the space of 50 years the number of Jews almost tripled, from 849 (1850) to 2,296 (1900). After the 1869 congress that formally split Hungarian Jewry into three separate streams, the Komárno community joined the Neolog movement; a separate Orthodox community was established in 1880. The two communities used the same cemetery, which was split into two sections. Two community synagogues still stand today; the former Orthodox synagogue was integrated in the complex of a (non-Jewish) old age home. The Neolog Temple is used as a sport club. In 1941 there were 2,734 Jews in Komárno. They were deported to Auschwitz in 1944; only 248 survived.

There are fewer than 100 Jews living here today and the Jewish community life centers around the Menhaz complex - a former Jewish old age home that still has an active synagogue, community center and a small Jewish museum. The web site is not available at this time in English, but using Google Translate will translate it to other languages.
http://www.menhaz.sk

Address of the Menhaz complex
Eotvosa 15

http://kehreg.com/english/

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0012
_0_11418.html

There is a bridge over the Danube that links Komarno with Komorom in Hungary
https://www.facebook.com/menhaz.sk

http://www.ejpress.org/article/14437

Cemetery
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Jewish_cemetery_in
_Kom%C3%A1rno

Holocaust
http://kehreg.com/2006/12/29/portraits-of-survival-people-from-
komarno/

http://www.geshergalicia.org/?s=Slovakia

Synagogue
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/148.html


Konus - 20

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/konus-michalovce.html


  Map

http://www.maplandia.com/slovakia/kosice/sobrance/konus/


Koromia - 50

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.haruth.com/JewsSlovakia.html

http://www.geohive.com/cntry/slovakia.aspx?sub=y&levels=Vychodne%20Slovensko&diacrit=1


Koronowo

The Jewish cemetery in Koronowo is located on Kotomirska St. The area is partially surrounded by a brick wall; there are 25 Matzevot left.


Kosarovce - 50

Cemetery
Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/kosarovce.html

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/places/kosarovce


Kosice - (German is Kassau - Kassa in Hungarian, Kashau)

Population 235,000, it is the second largest city and the unofficial capital of eastern Slovakia. It is also home to the country's second largest Jewish community. Jewish records from Kosice, and a number of other towns in eastern Slovakia, have been filmed by the Mormons and are available at the FHC (Family History Centers). A web site that allows the posting of your surnames and villages of interest on the internet
http://www.iarelative.com/search/index.html
 

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/149.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo495.html

The city of Košice features valuable grouping of Jewish monuments. This eastern Slovak city used to be prior to the Holocaust a center with several Jewish communities representing broad spectrum of Jewish religious streams. Communal buildings of former Hassidic, Orthodox, Neolog and Status Quo Ante congregations, some of them with original inventory, have been preserved until these days.

A Jewish family (Daniel and Magda Riemer) recently married their two daughters in this city of 250,000 located in the far eastern tip of Slovakia.

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/koice.html

Holocaust
http://avav27kocz.blogspot.com/2004/12/tragedy-of-kosice-city-jews.html

Synagogue
The synagogue in
Košice was designed by architect Lajos Kozma and is undergoing restoration after being used for decades as a book repository, a prayer room, a mikve and communal offices.  It is located on Zvonarska Street near the city's main square.
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Kowalewo Pomorskie

The Jewish cemetery in Kowalewo Pomorskie was established about 1830. First Jews arrived to town in ’20 of 19th century. In 1882 a synagogue was built. During Word War II the cemetery was destroyed; today there are no fragments of Matzevot left. The area is partially built over. The cemetery is 0.09 ha.


Kralovsky Chlmec (Krulovsky Chlmec) - 200 - 300

  

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/kralovsky-chlmec.html

www.slovakiacompany.com/business/.../jewish.../kralovsky-chlmec 

www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/kralovsky-chlmec.html 

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo514.html


Krisovska Lieskova - 50

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/krisovska-lieskova.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kri%C5%A1ovsk%C3%A1_Lieskov%C3%A1


Kruszwica

The Jewish cemetery in Kruszwica was located on Ziemowita St. There is no trace left of the cemetery. The area is built over.


Kucin

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/eastern-europe/index.html

   Map

http://www.maplandia.com/slovakia/presov/bardejov/kucin/


Kurima - 80

211.2 miles ENE of Bratislava

Cemetery
This cemetery is isolated suburban hillside cemetery has no sign or marker. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all with no wall or gate. 1-20 20th century tombstones are in original locations. Site is used for waste dump or abandoned [unclear]. Adjacent properties are agricultural. Private visitors stop rarely. Vegetation is a very serious threat disturbing stones.
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/kurima.html

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/


Ladomirova 113

Ladomirová lies northeast of the road transit Svidník move north-south. With 800 inhabitants is the largest Ruthenian village in the district. It was, for centuries, part of the Makovicky castle estate. The first written mention is from r.1364. In the 15th Century.  A toll house on the trade route from Hungary to Poland was established.

Ladomirova was well known by its great market places. During that period, there were a number of Jewish communities in which a lot of merchants were doing business not only from the Austro-Hungarian monarchy but also Jewish tradesmen from the territory of Poland. Ladomirova. There is a military cemetery with a chapel here from the 1st World War, where over 200 Romanian, Russian and German soldiers were buried.  The currently neglected / Jewish cemetery on the small hill called Kytkanya where Jewish citizens in the past from all sub-Dukla region had been buried.




http://lemko.org/rusyn/lad2.jpg

 

Foundation for the renewal and maintenance of Jewish cemeteries Ladomirová
Ing. Michael Church / mayor / Foundation, which aims to:

  • Restoration and management of the Jewish cemetery in the village Ladomirová and its use in a network of cultural heritage of the region,
     

  • An information database of Jewish citizens buried in the cemetery, but also about other people lived and their descendants from our poddukelkého living in our region and in the world,
     

  • The establishment of contact centers for those interested not only in Slovakia, but from around the world in more information research issues
     

  • Concentration exhibits and photographic documentation for the establishment of the memorial room. The long term goal is to establish a museum of Jewish culture poddukelského region in our community,
     

  • Support non-profit organizations, individuals knowledgeable professional, but especially the students involved in the study, research and publication activities in matters of Jewish culture in the Carpathian region

Members of the Council:
Dr. And Dr. Jan Rodak. Joseph Choma - historians / seminary and PR /, and Vasil Gajdula Ducarova Renata - professors of Angličtina / translation / owl Eliash and Janochko Mikulash - priests of the Orthodox and Uniate churches, Patlevich Jaroslav, Eng. Michael Kost - management activities of the Foundation, Dr.. Friga Miroslav - lawyer, The above was written: Mgr. Vlasta Lazov Eng. Michael Kost Translated: Vasil Gajdula and revised slightly by the Webmaster.

Cemetery
There is an old Jewish cemetery.    It is about
221.2 miles ENE of Bratislava. There are two towns named Ladomirova very near each other. This one is north of Stropkov on route E371/73.113 graves.
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/ladomirova.html

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/places/ladomirova

Holocaust
http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameResults.html?placeBirth=Ladomirova,%20%20Saris,%20%20Slovakia,%20%0Czechoslovakia&placeBirthType=LITERAL&language=en


Ladmovce - 30

Ladmovce is located in Slovakia just over the Hungarian border, 3.5 km N of Satoralijauijhely, Hungary and 50 km ESE of Kosice, Slovakia,
48ş25' 21ş42'
, 215.2 miles E of Bratislava. The cemetery is located at the end of the town on flat land. When entering from the south, it is on the right hand side. Town population is about 500 with no known Jewish population.

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/ladmovce.html


Lieskova - 7

http://www.jewishroots.hu/main.php?lang=8&cnt=4

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

http://picasaweb.google.com/bobby1st.1

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/krisovska-lieskova.html


 

Liptovský Mikuláš

Historically, this town served as the seat of Liptov County, where for more than 200 years Jews were well respected and socially integrated. The Jewish community began to develop in the 18th century, reaching 1,115 people, or nearly 40 per cent of the total population, in 1880. In 1865 the town, then known as Liptovský Svätý Mikuláš, became the first town in Hungary to elect a Jewish mayor – Isaac Diner. This was two years before Jews acquired civil rights in the country. Three more Jews followed in this office, which is a sign of religious and cultural tolerance in the city. The Jewish community belonged to the Neolog stream and before the Second World War numbered about a thousand people. There is no Jewish community in the city anymore. The Jewish cemetery disappeared in the 1980s, when it was expropriated by the municipality; the gravestones were stolen.

There is a neo-classic synagogue in this town which is one of the most beautiful in the country.
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/153.html


Litmanova

http://www.worldvitalrecords.com/Litmanova

https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Slovakia_Websites


Lipany - 50 - (He'thars, Hungary, Siebenlinden, Lipjany, Lipiany, Septem, Tiliis)

Located 1188.7 miles East Northeast of Bratislava.

Debbie Raff seraph@dc.rr.com has developed a website 'Welcome to Lipany, Slovakia' which includes maps and a town history for this town.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lipany/
  

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town.  There are at least 62 headstones in this cemetery.  
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/lipany.html


http://www.pbase.com/trip/lipany

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

Synagogue
http://archiv.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/volltextserver/volltexte/2005/5839/pdf/Borsky_Maros_

Synagogue_Architecture_in_Slovakia_text_for_www.pdf


Liptovský Mikuláš  (Liptovsky Mikulas, Liptovský Mikuláš, Liptószentmiklós)

Jews first settled this town in 1720. Liptovsky Mikulas was the first city in then-Hungary to elect a Jewish mayor; Isaac Diner, elected in 1865, was the first of several Jews to serve in the post.

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/liptovsky-svaty-mikulas.html

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/places/liptovsky_mikulas


http://jewish-heritage-travel.blogspot.com/2011/08/slovaki-liptovsky-mikulas.html

Synagogue
There still is a synagogue in this town that has been partially restored and is on central Holleho Street.
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/153.html


Litmanova

A village nestled in the Carpathian mountains of northeastern Slovakia, in the Stara Lubovna district, and adjacent to the Polish border
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

Records
Birth and Marriage records, photos and other links illustrate the life of this town  
http://censuslinks.com/Slovakia.html

Research
List of liquidated Jewish firms
http://www.genealogylinks.net/europe/slovakia/

Over the decades, the Magnes acquired a host of small archival collections documenting the activities of individuals, families and organizations in the Global Jewish Diaspora, with a focus on Europe and the United States. Among the highlights of these collections are the Simon Belkin papers and photographs on the assistance provided to Jewish refugees in Eastern Europe after the First World War, the records of the Jewish community of Liptovsky Mikulas, correspondence of Samuel David Luzzatto and his son and editor Isaia Luzzatto, Rabbi Baruch Braunstein's collection on the Inquisition in Majorca, and several collections of primary sources documenting the Holocaust, including Prof. Koppel Pinson's scrapbooks from the Offenbach Archival Depot
http://www.magnes.org/collections/archives/global-jewish-diaspora


Ljubljana

Capital city of Slovakia 

http://www.mavensearch.com/synagogues/C3461Y42196RX

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/slovenia.html

http://www.jewishcommunity.si/jss/ENG-zgodovina.asp

http://www.jewishcommunity.si/


Lozin - 15

219.1 miles E of Bratislava

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Czech_and_Slovak_Jews

http://www.wfjcsh.org/rescuers/JewishRescuersinIsrael.htm

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/lozin.html


Lucenec - 100 to 200

Only 80 to 100 of the town's 2,200 Jews survived WW II.  Today, only 14 are left, according to Gertruda Sternlichtova, head of the Lucenec Jewish Community.  A more detailed story about the attempt to rebuild this synagogue is written as a news article in the American Jewish World of June 21, 2002. Email  amjewish@isd.net  Lucenec (new) is located in Lucenec, west of Rimavska Sobota.

Jews settled in the Lucenec area in the late 1700's. The first synagogue was built in 1863. By 1900, the Jewish population was about 2,000 out of a total population of 9,000. In 1941, the Jewish population was about 2,100. When the area was annexed to Hungary in November, 1938, many Jews were sent to forced labor camps. In May, 1944, when the Germans took control, a ghetto was formed under a Judenrat. All remaining Jews were deported to Auschwitz in June, 1944.
http://www.edwardvictor.com/2005/Lucenec.htm

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
This cemetery has
masonry walls and a locking gate
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/lucenec.html

Synagogue
There is just one synagogue left in this town which once had five.  The remaining synagogue has an interesting history.  It was built by Hungarian architect Lipot Baumhorn (1860-1932) whose other structures grace Amsterdam, Brussels and Tel-Aviv.  Other than its foundations and a recently added copper roof, the synagogue is in poor condition.  Built in 1924-1925, the synagogue housed religious services until 1944, when the Jews of Lucenec were transported to Nazi concentration camps in Poland and Germany
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo295.html


Lutina - 10

192.6 miles ENE of Bratislava in the Presov region
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Slovakia

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/places/lutina

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/lutina.html


Malacky


http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/malacky-synagogue.html

Malacky is the center of the Záhorie region in western Slovakia. Jews settled here in the nineteenth century, and their number reached its peak in 1880, when the town had 397 Jewish residents. When the Slovakian state was established on March 14, 1939, there were 300 Jews in Malacky.  This little town is north of Bratislava. 

http://www.bund-avoda.at/seiten/links/

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/malacky-bratislava-vidiek.html

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

Synagogue
The synagogue, designed by architect Wilhelm Stiassny in once fashionable Moorish style.  He also designed synagogues in Vrbové and Prešov.  The unique exterior design has made the synagogue, which was built in 1900, a major tourist attraction, although it is now used as an art school.
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/malacky-synagogue.html


Maly Kamenec - 20

A Jewish community has existed in this town prior to WWII, which was destroyed in 1944 by Nazi Germany.  (the name of the town is spelled in Hebrew: סאמאטאר or סאמאטער) You can also see it here: http://picasaweb.google.com/bobby1st.7/SomotorSlovakia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mal%C3%BD_Kamenec

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town.  Scroll down to near the end to see Jewish tombstones. 
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town, contact J. Rubin in Brooklyn NY at: starjsr@gmail.com  for a CD containing hi-res photos of all headstones in this cemetery, including the surrounding area.
http://www2.sbg.ac.at/chc/pdf_downloads/HQ/COM_HQ_report_09_
2009.pdf


   Maps
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/3829051


Maly Mores - 15

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Margecany - 15

Margecany is located in Spisska Nova Ves

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/margecany-spisska
-nova-ves.html


   Map

http://en.e-obce.sk/obec/margecany/mapaobce.html 


Martin

Population 60,000
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/database/database.php?MonumentID=161&LangID=1&CategoryID=0

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/turciansky-svaty-martin-see-martin.html


Medzilaborce - 461

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

Cemetery
There are several smaller Jewish cemeteries in villages near Medzilaborce according to Mgr. Jan Hlavinka of The Museum of The Slovak National Uprising in Banska Bystrica.  There are cemeteries in Certizne, Krasny Brod, Vyrava.  He has photos of the Jewish cemetery in Certizne and intends to take photos of other Jewish cemeteries in the future.
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/eastern-europe/index.html

 
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

Research
http://www.carpatho-rusyn.org/1869txt.htm

Yizkor Book
For the town of Medzilaborce and the surrounding communities. Jan Hlavinka, a researcher at the
Institute of National Memory of Slovakia is working with Meyer Denn  meyersdenn@ev1.net

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/Slo065.html


Medzilaborce County

Had a large Jewish community before 1942 before it was destroyed by the Nazis and their Slovak supporters.  There are no Jews in the county today, but he is researching the history of this community and is looking for people who have their roots in Medzilaborce county.  Scroll down a bit and you can read the site in English.  Jan's phone no. +421 907 221 039 
www.webpark.sk/jcmlproject
 


Michalany - 30

Michalany is located S of Trebisov.

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/michalany.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.kpk-toronto.org/archives/clergy_rescue_saving%20jews_Oct09.pdf


Michalovce 1300 (Nagymihály (HU), Michalovce (CZ), Mikhaylovets (Yiddish), Groß-Michl,
                                     Michalowitz, Mihalevich,  Mikhalovich, Mikhalowitz, Nadimihali, Nadzhmihali,
                                     Nadymihaya, Mykhaylovyts,  Mihályovci, Nagy-Mihaly, Mihalowcze, Nagy-S
                                    [ent]- Mihaly, Mihalowce,  Mihalovce, Michalany  Michal'ovce
town)

http://www.edwardvictor.com/michalovce_slovakia_main.htm

Located in eastern Slovakia, about 60 km (40 miles) due east of Kosice and 35 km west of Uzhgorod, Ukraine on Highway E50.  Jews were named in the 1724 Census. Michalovce was a town in northeast Slovakia. In 1941, there were about 4,000 Jews in the town. In May, 1942, about 3,000 Jews were deported to the Lublin district of Poland. The remaining Jews were sent to western Slovakia in May, 1944. About 15% of the community survived.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0014
_0_13831.html

http://www.edwardvictor.com/Ghettos/Michalovce.htm

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/michalovce-michalovce.html

Records
Bobby Furst has presented a digital copy of the burial book for Michalovce, Slovakia, to the H-SIG. Burials range from the 19th century until the late 20th century

The JewishGen Hungary database covers all of pre-Trianon Hungary
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/

Synagogue
http://www.flickr.com/photos/9679871@N04/1160191603/


Michalovce-Stranany - 51

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0014
_0_13831.html

http://www.porges.net/JewishHistoryOfCzechRepub.html

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/index/Page-4.html


Myjava (Miava) Slovakia/Hungary


Old Jewish Cemetery in Myjava
http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/12627550.jpg

Myjava is located NE of Seneca.

Cemetery
http://collections.yadvashem.org/photosarchive/en-us/14690.html

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/myjava-senica.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Has Slovakia information and links. Contact Rivka Nessim.
The site includes links to Bohemia-Moravia SIG, Denmark SIG, German-Jewish SIG, Hungary SIG and Stammbaum - German SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/


Nacina Ves - 34

Once known as Natafalva, Hungary it is 221.4 miles ENE of Bratislava and is in the Kosicky region Michalovce district

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/spisska-nova-ves-jewish-cemetery.html


http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/nacina-vez.html


Nagy Vitez - 9

The villages of Nagy Vitez and Kis Vitez in Saris county, now known as Vitaz, Slovakia
http://boards.ancestry.com.au/localities.ceeurope.slovakia.general/2052
/mb.ashx


http://www.hungarianvillagefinder.com/HVFIndex2/41_SAROS.html

http://www.oocities.org/rcibella/

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/gazetteers/1877/saros.htm

Cemetery

A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSob=c&GSmid=46899233&

http://archivespro.com/

Travel
http://www.hotel-magita.hu/en/bemutatkozunk/latnivalo/kalandozas/


Nitra

Population of 90,000. Slovak historians believe that Nitra is the location of the oldest Slovakian Jewish community. In 896 Hungarian tribes invaded the Panonian plain; in 906 they destroyed the Slavonic kingdom of Moravia and probably captured Nitra as well. One of these tribes may have been the *Khazars of Jewish faith, which settled in the vicinity of Nitra. In a 1248 description of Nitra, "castrum iudeorum" can be interpreted as a Jewish settlement, in the vicinity of the neighboring village of Parovce. For centuries Parovce served as the Jewish extension of Nitra, where Jews were not admitted. In 1840, when the Budapest parliament allowed Jews to settle anywhere, the Jews of Parovce moved to Nitra. Many poor Jews who could not afford to move to Nitra stayed in Parovce. In 1989, with the collapse of Communism in Czechoslovakia, Parovce was inhabited by gypsies
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0015
_0_14886.html

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

Cemetery
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/jewish-museum-slovakia.html

Synagogue
The synagogue, built in 1911, designed by architect Leopold (Lipót) Baumhorn  in a combination of art noveau, Byzantine and Moorish style.  He also restored the synagogues in Liptovský Mikuláš. It has now been restored to serve as concert and exhibition hall. The second-floor women's gallery houses Slovakia's national Holocaust Memorial, called the Fate of Slovak Jews.  It is located at Pri Synagogue 3, a narrow street in the town center
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Nizna Sebastova

Nizna Sebastova is located NE of Presov in the Presovsky Region and the Presov District.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/stropkov/Forfur~1.htm

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/nizna-sebastova.html

http://www.radixhub.com/radixhub/places/presov_%5Bnizna_sebastova%5D


Nizny Hrabovec - 30

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Nizny Hrusov - 12

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Nove Zamky (Slovak. Nové Zámky; Hung. Ersekújvár; Ger. Neuhaeusel)

A town in S. Slovakia, since 1993 the Slovak Republic. Until 1840, Jews were not permitted to live in Nove Zamky. They attended markets in the town and lived in nearby Surany (Nagysuran). In 1840, when the Hungarian Parliament passed the law permitting Jewish settlement, the first Jewish families moved there, where they traded in grain and horses. In 1855 the community numbered 85. In 1857 they founded a Chevra Kadisha and in 1858 consecrated a cemetery. In 1860 the first synagogue was erected. Railway connections with Budapest and Vienna increased the economic importance of the town, and the Jewish population grew accordingly. In 1857 there were 892 Jews; in 1890 there were 1,491; and in 1910 there were 1,540. The first Czechoslovak census of 1921 recorded 2,087 Jews; the 1930 census recorded 2,535. On the eve of the deportations in 1940 there were 3,000 Jews in Nove Zamky
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0015
_0_14937.html


Oborin  - 12

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Palota (Nowotaniec, Nowotaniec Bieszczadzki; ד בנוביטַניץ' Novitanitz (Yiddish) Lebetanz (German)

It is located 194.0 miles SSE of Warszawa. Nowotaniec is a village in southeast Poland with a 2002 population of 430 in the Bukowsko Upland mountains, Subcarpathian Voivodeship (since 1999) and previously in Krosno Voivodeship (1975-1998) and Sanok district, Bukowsko sub district, near the towns of Medzilaborce and Palota (in NE Slovakia). The first Jewish families appeared in Nowotaniec early in the 18th century. In 1765, 74 Jews lived in the village and were subordinate to the Rymanów Kahal although independence was given before 1777. 10-12 Jewish families were in village in four houses. In 1824, the Kahal had 84 members. In 1870, 249 Jews lived in a community that owned a synagogue and school with 22 pupils. In 1885, Yeshi Michal Gilernter, born in 1842 was appointed rabbi. In 1900, the Jewish community had 287 persons but no rabbi. In year 1921, 42 Jews remained. [June 2009]
http://drs.library.yale.edu:8083/fedora/get/mssa:ms.1824/PDF

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/poland/nowotaniec.html

Research
http://www.carpatho-rusyn.org/palota.htm


Pavlovce nad Uhom - 25

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Pecovska Nova Ves - 30

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Pezinok  (Slovak Pezinok; Hung. Bazín; Ger. Poesing, Boesing)

A town in Slovakia (part of Czechoslovakia 1918–1991; since then the Slovak Republic). In 1450 Jews were permitted to live in Pezinok, which was inhabited by Germans and Slovaks. In 1529 Counts Wolfang and George von Pezinok and St. George, who were heavily in debt to Jews, began to imprison local Jews. When the mutilated body of a young boy was found, it was deemed an act of Jewish ritual murder. The imprisoned Jews were tortured in the main square until they confessed to the murder and other crimes. On May 21, 1529, some 30 men, women, and children were burned at the stake. Only children under 10 were pardoned and were converted to Christianity. The pardon granted to the victims by Emperor Ferdinand I reached them late. Jews were prohibited to live in Pezinok or even spend a night. In 1540 the Protestant reformer Andreas *Osiander published a booklet repudiating the Pezinok blood libels and incriminating the count who started it. The booklet was attacked by Johann Eck and repudiated by Martin *Luther
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0016
_0_15680.html

Cemetery
"The Jewish cemetery in Pezinok has a rather unfortunate history. After WWII, the property was privatized and currently serves as some gentleman's backyard. To be more exact, the original cemetery is divided into 3 sections, but only one section actually resembles a cemetery.

The story is rather convoluted, but in a nutshell, this is it:  When our rep arrived there he was greeted by a sorry sight; the lion's share of the visible tombstones were piled atop each other and stacked in various areas of the cemetery. Further inquiries revealed that unfortunately, most of the tombstones from the other 2 sections had been relocated to this section in a rather haphazard manner. The other two parts of the backyard were beautifully landscaped and, of course, bereft of headstones."

"To their credit, the owner and his wife were very reasonable and accommodating, and after some negotiating, it was agreed that backyard #1 will be cleaned thoroughly and all the tombstones re-cemented and erected. They also agreed to allow several tombstones to be erected in in the other two backyards. Of course, it would then be necessary to erect a monument commemorating the deceased Jews of Pezinok (and those deported in WWII) and more importantly, to inform visitors of the situation, stating that the accuracy of the headstone positions cannot be guaranteed."

"The restoration project of the Pezinok cemetery was launched a couple of weeks ago.  Our Hungarian rep Mr. Szabo, and his entire staff, outdid themselves;  he and his crew of devoted laborers toiled for days to try and match the hundreds of puzzle-like fragments of the headstones  and re-cement/re-erect them  in a most orderly fashion."

"It is emblematic of the significance of this sacred work that the surrounding neighbors were so impressed with the sudden attention and concern towards our ancestors' resting place, that a couple of amiable fellows actually approached  the HFPJC members and informed them that since these "stones" are apparently of great importance to him, they know of several more that are concentrated in some obscure spot hitherto unknown to us! Of course, they led him to the place, and "those stones" will be rightfully erected in the cemetery."

"All the same, there is still much work to be done. However, all our attempts at determining the precise locations of the gravestones were futile. If somebody out there has any information which might be helpful, or perhaps an old photograph of the cemetery, we'd be extremely grateful if you could contact us via Email: hfpjc@thejnet.com or telephone (800-945-1552)."  From a posting by Toby Mendlowitz Assistant Director HFPJC Brooklyn, NY


Plavnica - 50

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Podlipniky - 13

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.webzdarma.cz/blocked.page.abuse.html?id=menu%2Fcemetnew.php


Poprad

Population 53,000


Poruba pod Vihorlatom - 41

Cemetery
Marshall Katz Packard40@aol.com has photos of the 41 tombstones and plans to post them on a ShtetLinks web page he is creating for this village.
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/
 

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Klyucharki/


Potspadi

Located outside of Kezmarok.


Presov  (Hungarian = Eperjes; German = Eperies)

Sanctuary.  Photo by Ruth Ellen Gruber
http://jewish-heritage-travel.blogspot.com/2011/08/slovakia-more-highlights-from-slovak.html

Population 88,000 with only a few dozen Jews living here now. It is near Kosice and has a magnificent Orthodox synagogue built in 1897.  I have the list of the Presov Jewish Community, who died in the Shoah, given to me by the daughter of a past Presov rabbi. Source: John Froebel-Parker; froebel@albany.net

Cemetery
A list of Orthodox burials in the Presov Jewish cemetery -
Presov also used the cemetery at Circ.
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/presov-o.txt

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/presov-presov.html

The Museum of Jewish Culture
Established in the orthodox synagogue of Presov.

Regional Special Interest Groups
Has Slovakia information and links.  The site includes links to Bohemia-Moravia SIG, Denmark SIG, German-Jewish SIG, Hungary SIG and Stammbaum - German SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html

Synagogue
The synagogue, designed by architect Wilhelm Stiassny in once fashionable Moorish style.  He also designed synagogues in Malacky and Vrbové.  There is a Holocaust Memorial in the courtyard
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html

http://www.synagoga-presov.sk


Pressburg (Presburg, Bratislava)

Located in what is now Slovakia since about the 10th century.  Before WWI, it was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.  This is the German name for Bratislava, the capitol city of the Slovak Republic. 


Pozsony Rabbinical Academy

Located here. "I believe" that this yeshiva might have been the same one founded by Rabbi Moshe SOFER (SCHREIBER)(1762-1839).  When the rabbinate of Pressburg became vacant in 1806, he was called to become chief rabbi and he founded the world's largest rabbinical school." From a posting by Pamela Weisberger 


Priekopa - 10

Cemetery
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/
 


Rakovec nad Ondavou - 50

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Raslavice - 50

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town.  


Remeniny

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Sabinov - 120

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Samorin

Jews were barred from living in Šamorín until the nineteenth century. Instead, they resided in nearby Mliečno and commuted to Šamorín for business. They gradually moved to Šamorín after an organized Jewish community was established here in the 1860s. In 1912, the Jewish community built a new synagogue on the eastern outskirts of town. The Šamorín community had 318 members in 1930 but was devastated during the Holocaust. No Jews live in Šamorín today

Synagogue
Šamorín
' s former synagogue stands at the heart of a traditional architectural setting that also comprises a former Jewish school and other Jewish communal buildings. The Jewish cemetery is located nearby
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/147.html

Slovak Jewish Heritage Route
An article authored by Ruth Ellen Gruber was published in the April/May 2013 issue of Hadassah Magazine
http://www.hadassahmagazine.org/site/apps/nlnet/content.aspx?c=twI6LmN7IzF&b=6725377&ct=13077875


Sacurov -5

Cemetery
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/
 


Sahy (Šahy, Ipolyság)

Šahy, today on the border between Slovakia and Hungary, is located in the former Hont County, which for centuries was a mining region closed to Jewish settlement. The development of a Jewish community here began after 1840, when the legal obstacles to Jewish presence were rescinded. The Jewish community grew quickly, and during the decades before the Holocaust Jews formed about 15 per cent of the total population. Jews owned most local small businesses, including the Neumann printing house, the oldest in the town.  It is located on the Slovak-Hungarian border
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/sahy-status-quo-synagogue.html

http://www.hadassahmagazine.org/site/apps/nlnet/content.aspx?c=twI6LmN7IzF&b=5698175&ct=13077875

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/slovakia.html

Cemetery
There are two Jewish cemeteries
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/sahy-levice.html

Holocaust
The local history museum has a plaque listing the names of more than 900 local Holocaust victims.

Synagogue
The Orthodox synagogue was bult in 1852 and is located on Bela Bartok Square near the center of the town. It has been restored and is now a contemporary arts center.


Samorin (Somorja, Sommerein)


Books

"Saving What Remains: A Holocaust Survivor's Journey Home to Reclaim Her Ancestry"
Authored by Livia Bitton-Jackson, a story of her return in 1980 to her childhood town.  She was no ordinary tourist.
Thirty-six years earlier, as a thirteen-year-old girl in what was then the Hungarian town of Somorja, she and her family had been deported to Auschwitz


Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/samorin-dunajska-
streda.html


Map

http://wikimapia.org/6036247/%C5%A0amor%C3%ADn-Somorja-Sommerein

The Synagogue's Interior by Csaba and Suzanne Kis.
The Synagogue's Interior by Csaba and Suzanne Kis
http://www.artmargins.com/index.php/5-interviews/353-right-at-home
-with-art

Synagogue
Now a contemporary arts complex - Right At Home Gallery
Mliecnansk 6
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/147.html


Šarišské Lúky

There is a neo-classic synagogue in this town.
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Šaštín-Stráže

There is a neo-classic synagogue in this town.
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Satoraljaujhely

The capital of Zemplen megye, which stretched into Slovakia.  Some records for places now in Slovakia re in the archives in Satoraljaujhely.


Secovce - 303

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Sena - 10

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Sered

The Jewish community of Sereď was one of the oldest in western Slovakia and traced its origin to refugees fleeing Uherský Brod after a pogrom in 1683. The community reached its peak during the nineteenth century, when it joined the Orthodox movement. It was one of the largest Jewish communities in the region: In 1880, some 1,354 Jews made up about 27 % of the town's entire population of 5,004. Local Jews were active in business and they also owned the local sugar refinery. During World War II one of the three labor camps set up for Jews in Slovakia was established here. Internment at the camp saved about 500 Slovak Jews from deportation. The camp was also, however, used as a transit center for Jews being sent to death camps in 1942 and 1944-1945. The last deportation left for Terezín in March 1945

Cemetery
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/sered-jewish-cemetery.html


Siroke - 25

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Sloveska Kajna - 57

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Snina - 31


Sobrance - 130

Cemetery
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/
 


Somotor - 45 

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
Somotor has a large contingent of the ethnically-Hungarian Szeman family which emigrated to Somotor from Bodrogszentmária in the mid to late 18th century.
http://metagini.com/location/Slovakia/Kamenec/94091/Web%20Links/


Spisska Nova Ves - 350 

SpisskaNVes1.jpg

http://www.judaica.cz/pohled1.asp

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. It is located on Kollarova Street at the eastern outskirts of town.  Partially ruined, the cemetery history is included in the local high school's curriculum, and students voluntarily cleaned up the grounds and erected an information panel as well as a memorial plaque commemorating the deaths of the children who had studied at this school and murdered by the Nazis.
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/0026_SpisskaNova.htm


Spisske Podhradie - 11 


http://www.judaica.cz/NavBar1.asp?V1=79

The town lies in the shadow of the hilltop ruins of Spis Castle and is located NE of Spisska Nova Ves. Spišské Podhradie once had a mixed population of Slovaks, Germans and Jews. Jews settled here only after a ban on their residence was lifted in 1840. The town became a rabbinical center, and its Jewish population grew from 219 in 1869 to 458 in 1940. The community, which adhered to the Orthodox stream, maintained a yeshiva and other institutions. Today, no Jews live here
http://www.judaica.cz/NavBar1.asp?V1=78

Cemetery
The cemetery walls have been restored according to Barbara Kaufman
 babsk@bestweb.net   She further states that there is a list of the gravestones on the JewishGen's Hungary SIG and that she has pictures of most of the stones.

www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/

Synagogue
Stefanikova 78

Only the synagogue in town center and the neglected Jewish cemetery, about 3 kilometers outside of town to the north, bear witness to the Jewish past. The synagogue has been undergoing a restoration process for years. The building is already used for cultural purposes, and there are plans to install a new permanent exhibition in the women’s gallery as a branch of the Museum of Jewish Culture in Bratislava. The simple building was constructed around 1875 and restored after a fire in 1905-1906. It is a typical example of nineteenth century provincial synagogue architecture, with its eastern façade oriented to the street and accentuated by four polygonal pillars with massive stone balls. The interior has been relatively well preserved; the women’s gallery is supported by cast iron columns, and the original ark (Aron haKodesh) is still in place. The splendid decorations are currently being restored
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/spisske-podhradie-synagogue.html

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/spisske-podhradie
.html

Travel
http://jewish-heritage-travel.blogspot.com/2011/08/slovakia-more-on-jewish-heritage-route.html


Stakcin - 3

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Stara Lubovna - 57

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Strazske - 30

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Streda nad Bodrogom - 20

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Stropkov - 200  

Lies on the banks of the Ondava river, in northeastern Slovakia, near where the Polish and Russian borders meet.   It is located about 50 km (30 miles) north northeast of Presov (formerly Eperjes).  It is also located on highway 557 12 km (8 miles) southeast of the town of Svidnik.   Jews first arrived about 1640.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Stropkov1/Stropkov.html

There is a website created by Melody Amsel Gross
http://www.avotaynu.com/books/stropkov.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetLinks?Stropkov/StropkovSztropko.htm

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. The
Stropkov cemetery is open to all via a fence with an unlocked gate. 250 meters from the main road (which goes to Vraanov), the cemetery is 140x28-30 meters. 100-500 tombstones date from 1900-1942, some in original locations but many fallen. They lay from N to S with the inscriptions at the W side. Of the marble, granite, and sandstone flat shaped and finely smoothed tombstones, many are illegible, worn completely smooth. Most sandstone monuments are flaking into layers, disintegrating and falling off. Those that can be read are in Hebrew without surnames. Some show ornamental leaves and vines. One ohel (Zborover Rebbe, R. Yitzhak Hersh Amsel) is in bad repair in the W section, deep within the under - and overgrowth. Vegetation, growing unchecked, damages tombstones. An open well exists within the cemetery, probably once a Beit tahara. Private visitors arrive occasionally. There is no regular caretaker. The property belongs to the Municipality of Stropkov, 38 Hlavna Street, Stropkov. The city architect, Marko Vateha, is a willing guide and very knowledgeable about both the cemetery and the town.
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/stropkov.html

Records
Bobby Furst states that "I have digital photos of pages from birth, marriage, deaths from this town."  These books have not been microfilmed by the LDS."

Regional Special Interest Groups
Has Slovakia information and links.  The site includes links to Bohemia-Moravia SIG, Denmark SIG, German-Jewish SIG, Hungary SIG and Stammbaum - German SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/W_Europe.html

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Zichron Stropkov
"Between Galicia and Hungary: The Jews of Stropkov" (and her nearby Villages)
Authored by Melody Amsel. This is a memorable book about the Amsel family of Stropkov and, in addition, all of the Jews of Stropkov.  It is written in both English and Hebrew. It lists all of the Jews of Stropkov and neighboring communities, identifying the survivors in bold face.   There are over 100 photos. Of the more than 2,000 Stropkovers identified, only 162 survived the Holocaust.  Available through my link to Amazon.com
http://www.yatedo.com/s/birthplace%3A
(Stropkov


Stupava

http://www.wmf.org/project/stupava-synagogue

Located in this town are one of only two synagogues built in a nine-bay synagogue around a central Bima that supports the vaulted ceiling and has been preserved in this town. It is Slovakia's oldest synagogue, built in 1803 and stands just off the main road near the center of the town.  The synagogue building was purchased by a Bratislava Jewish businessman, Tomas Stern in 2006, when it was in ruin, and since then he has spent his money and time to slowly restore it as a cultural center
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html  

http://www.jta.org/2011/10/09/transatlantic/in-stupava-an-old-
synagogue-gets-new-lease-on-life


Svätý Jur

This town has a Baroque synagogue
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Svedlar

 Svedlar is located in Kosice.

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/slovakia.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Slovakia


  Maps


http://www.indexmundi.com/z/?lat=48.8166667&lon=20.7166667&t=p&r=4120&p=svedlar&cc=lo&c=
slovakia


Szenicze

The Jews considered themselves to be Hungarian


Tibava - 50


Trencin  (Slovak Trenčín; Hung. Trencsén; Ger. Trentschin), town in western Slovakia)

In the 14th century there were several Jews in Trencin. In the 16thcentury Jews reappeared. After the Kuruc invasion of Ubersky Brod in 1683, some Jews took refuge in Trencin. For the next 100 years, the community was under Ubersky Brod's jurisdiction. In 1734 the Jews took a secret oath to use only Ubersky Brod's court
in disputes and to avoid the Hungarian court system -
Population 57,000.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0020
_0_20024.html

Synagogue
An art nouveau domed synagogue is located in this town and is a city landmark.  It is currently a municipal art gallery.  It was built in 1913 and is still used by the handful of Jews living in the area.
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Trhoviste - 10

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town.   


Trnava

http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/trnava-status-quo-synagogue.html

Population 72,000 before WW II.  More than 2,000 local Jews were murdered here in the Holocaust and a Memorial stands outside the synagogue. The smaller Orthodox synagogue across the street has been restored and houses a modern art and photography gallery
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/slovakia.html

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/slovakia/trnava.html

Synagogues
The two former synagogues have both been turned into art galleries.  They are across from each other on the narrow Haulikova Street in the center of the town.  The Status Quo synagogue, built in the 1890s, is slightly churchlike with its two dome-topped towers
http://www.centropa.org/travel/ruth-ellen-gruber/bratislava-and-trnava


Turna nad Bodvou - 80

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town.    


Ubla - 25

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Varos Nameny   (Vranov nad Toplous)

Located near Kosice.  It may have been known as Vranov nad Toplous


Velany - 50

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Velky Saris - 50

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Velky Kamenec - 20

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Velke Kapusany - 142

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Vrbové

Synagogue
The synagogue, designed by architect Wilhelm Stiassny in once fashionable Moorish style.  He also designed synagogues in Malacky and Prešov
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Zalucie - 7

Cemetery
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/
 


Zboj - 30

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Zborov - 200

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 


Zemplinske Hradiste - 30

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/
 


Zemplinsky Branc - 30

Cemetery
A Jewish cemetery exists in this town. 
http://www.cemeteries.wz.cz/
 


Zilina

Population 84,000

Synagogue
The Zilina synagogue was designed by architect Peter Behrens and was constructed in the interwar period.
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/134.html


Zvolen

Population 42,000
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z%C3%B3lyom_County

Cemetery
The mass grave of 140 victims of Nazi crimes against humanity is located here. The cemetery has tombstones in Hebrew, German, Hungarian and Slovak and is a memorial to the Jewish community in Zvolen. More than 550 Jews lived in Zvolen in 1940. There are only a few Jewish residents here today, and they are members of the Jewish community of Banská Bystrica. The building of Zvolen' s former synagogue, at Jána Kozáčeka Street 10, serves as shop and office premises.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/slovakia.html

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3871887,00.html


http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/zvolen-park-of-generous-souls.html

Holocaust
http://www.slovak-jewish-heritage.org/zvolen-park-of-generous-souls.html

Photos
http://collections.yadvashem.org/photosarchive/en-us/4070649_4020778.html

more to come ...
 


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