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Ukraine   Guberniyas   Margulis Saga   Talnoye

Polish Cities, Shtetls and Villages   Galicia   Lithuanian Shtetls  

 

 

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Please note that not all links will work mostly because the
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Ukrainian       
Cities
and Shtetls
  

In Tomashpol, Vinnitsa Region
http://jewishshtetl.com/photo.asp?c=3&Photo=5

L'viv
http://miraimages.photoshelter.com/image/I00004jdOxwcwmw4

http://www.jerusalemcollection.com/jer04/JER04_14.jpg

History of the Jews of Ukraine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Ukraine

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/ukraine.html

http://ddickerson.igc.org/vrjc-jewish-ukraine-links.html

During Soviet days, Ukrainian cities carried Russian names, and since the Russian language doesn't have an "H" in the alphabet, a "G" was used in its place.                 

Outside the cities, the typical Jewish community in the Pale is the shtetl (mestechko), which usually has a few thousand inhabitants and is centered around the synagogue and marketplace. Jews earn their living as petty traders, middlemen, shopkeepers, peddlers and artisans, often working with woman and children as well.

Those who are no longer able to find any employment join the growing number of Luftmenshen - doing anything to earn a living. At the end of the century, the Jewish population has become so impoverished that approximately one-third depend to some degree on Jewish welfare organizations


Remember that the 1941 modern name of the shtetl of your inquiry may or may not be the same as the post WW II modern name.  Also note, that with the collapse of the Soviet regime in the 1990s, some towns with Bolshevized names have reverted to their historical names.

The Jews of Ukraine make up the fourth largest Jewish Community in the world, and are mainly concentrated in Kiev (110,000), Dniepropetrovsk (60,000), Kharkov (45,000) and Odessa (45,000)
 
Jews also live in many of the smaller towns.  Western Ukraine, however, has only a small remnant of its former Jewish population, with L'viv and Chernivtsi each having only about 6,000 Jews.  The majority of Jews in present-day Ukraine are native Russian/Ukrainian speakers, and only some of the elderly speak Yiddish as their mother tongue (in 1926, 76.1% claimed Yiddish as their mother tongue).  The average age is close to 45.

To find where records can be found, right click Archives Database, then Search Database Activate Soundex and type in your ancestral town names.
http://www.rtrfoundation.org/Archdta1.html

Jewish Agricultural Colonies in the Ukraine
A treasure trove of information created by Chaim Freedman with many outside links to other interesting sites within the scope of this subject
http://chfreedman.blogspot.com/2010/07/jewish-agricultural-colonies
-in-ukraine.html

Ukrainian Language, Culture and Travel
Included at this web site, are photos of synagogues and memorials along with articles about Jewish culture 
http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/ukraine.htm

Yizkor Books
Shtetlach, Towns and Regions
Our yizkor books are available for research purposes in our Library Archive.  They are housed in a separate enclosure, arranged by language.  They have been acquired through donations, purchasing, and via exchange.  To date, the HMC Library Archive yizkor book holdings include more than 1500 individual titles.  Click on the link below to search the index of memorial book locations.  Holdings are listed alphabetically by shtetl, town or region.  To find the complete bibliographic description, check the automated catalog at
http://catalog.holocaustcenter.org

A - D         E - K         L - P         R - T         U - Z

Books  
             


"Bricha"
Authored by Joseph Eisenbruch. This is a story of Joseph Eisenbruch, a native of L'viv, Holocaust survivor and one of the founders of the "Bricha" movement that brought Jews from Europe to Eretz Israel. He made Aliyah in the summer of 1945.  The book can be read on-line in both Hebrew and English
www.lookingback.co.il


"A Guide to Finding Your Town" - Ukraine GenWeb
http://rootsweb.com/~ukrwgw/ukrainetown.html


"A Historical Atlas"
Authored by Paul Robert Magocsi, with maps prepared by Geoffrey J. Matthews and published by University of Toronto Press in 1985.  The book is written in English and shows beautifully how Ukraine has changed over the years -- demographics, boundaries, language, surrounding political units, etc.
http://www.city.sumy.ua/history/book.html

The page shows up in Russian, but if you scroll down the page and there are English links.  If you click on the second choice you will get to the index called Ukraine: A Historical Atlas.


List and a Map of Agricultural Colonies
From Our Father's Harvest Supplement by Chaim Freedman. In 1983, a detailed large scale map was discovered in the library of the University of Texas by Michoel Ronn. whose family came from the region.  Click at the bottom of the page.

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Colonies_of_Ukraine/


A Picture Gallery of Ukrainian Cities
http://www.mtu-net.ru/rrr/ukraine.htm

Note: The shtetls and cities listed below include towns formerly in the Austro-Hungarian province of Galicia and are marked with "(G)".  Regional Special Interest Groups: Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 


"Spisok Naselennikh Mest Kienskoy Gubernii"
The
List of Shtetls of Kiev Guberniya with Index. 
 Available in some major libraries in the US


Maps 

The regions of Ukraine, in alphabetical order can be found at
http://genconnect.rootsweb.com/index/Ukraine.html 

Guberniyas
Russian for Province or county and was used by the Imperial Russian Government as the term for its major administrative units. Divided into Uyezds (districts) (a corrupted word for the old Russian district - it should read: Uyezd [ooh yeh zd],  then into Volosts which are similar to counties

Maps of Ukraine
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/maps.htm

Localities of Ukraine
A site that lists most of the Shtetls, towns and cities in English, in KOI-8 Cyrillic, and the name of the oblast (district) and a map identification.
 
http://www.lemko.org/roots.html
    

Ukrainian  Town Photos

Photos of Polish Towns, Ukrainian Towns, Hungarian Towns and Romanian Towns

http://polishjews.org/

http://polishjews.org/photos/index.htm

http://jewishshtetl.com/default.asp?c=3&sh=

You might also want to review the towns listed in my Galician page and you can also search for Vital Records for Galician Towns by visiting 
http://www.polishroots.org/galicia_towns.htm


Miestiechko = Ukrainian for shtetl

Povit = Ukrainian word for an administrative district/county similar in size to a township / County / district

Raion = Similar to a Province, was used during the Soviet period.  Oblasts are divided into Raions. For a list of oblasts
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
   

Selo = Ukrainian word for village

Two to four Volosts formed a Uchastok (section) which were overseen by 'nacha l'niks' (managers).  

The boundaries of a Uyezd, Guberniyas and the counties itself was in a constant state of flux before World
War I.

A complete map of all of the Oblasts and Regions of Ukraine
http://www.freenet.kiev.ua/ISD/ABOUTUKR/ukroblst.htm 

and a detail map of that area.  In English.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~ukrwgw/oblastclickmap.html
 

Another site is JewishGen's ShtetLinks site listing 200 or more Shtetls at
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/
  

Phone Codes

Ex USSR Phone Codes for Russia, Ukraine, Belorussia, Byelorussia, Moldova, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Georgia and Uzbekistan - you not only will see the phone code for each town (loads slowly) but also the proper spelling of the town name
http://phonecodes.narod.ru/N/N.htm
 

 

Ukrainian Cities, Villages
and Shtetls  
 
 
                City of L'viv


Abazovka

A Jewish agricultural colony near Balta, founded around 1850.  It no longer exists, but it's on maps from the 1930's and earlier.  Alan Shuchat ashuchat@wellesley.edu hired a private researcher who found census (reviziia) records for Alan's family from the 1850's and 1870's

http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2008-07/msg00412.html

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/UKR-ODESSA-GEN/2001-11/1006364105


Alchevsk  (Alchevs'k, Alchevskoe, Voroshilovsk, Woroschilowsk, Kommunarsk, Алчевськ [Ukr],  Алчевск [Rus)

A number of Alchevsk web sites (some in English)

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/alchevsk.html

Community
http://fjc.ru/centers/ukraine/alchevsk/


Alupka

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/1336-alupka


Alushta

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/eastern-europe/index.html


Anapol

There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives

http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.asia.russia.general/3024.1/mb.ashx

Cemetery
http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.asia.russia.general/3024.1/mb.ashx


Antratsyt

http://drymba.net/en/map/1030603-antratsyt-district


Artasuv

Yizkor Book
"Khurbn Jaryczow bay Lemberg: Sefer Zikaron le-Keoshei Jaryczow y-Sevivoteha"

(Destruction of Jaryczow: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Jaryczow and Surroundings Ukraine)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Artemivsk


Bachkurino

Located in Podolia Oblast near the border with Kiev Guberniya.


Bakhchysaray


Balta

A small town 200 km from Odessa. The population is about 20 to 30,000.  The town consisted of 2 separate parts: Balta (Ottoman Empire) and Jusefgrod (Polish territory).  It is located in the Odessa region. An excellent website, with photos, is located at
http://www.jewnet.ru/eng/orgs/?action=search


Banilow

Yizkor Book
"
Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html
 


Bar

Located now in Horodok Raion, west of L'viv and in the Podolia Province during the period of 1890 - 1925. The nearest town is Vinitsa This town is mentioned in
"
The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0003_0_01987.html

http://www.yadvashem.org/untoldstories/database/index.asp?cid=324

Monument on the mass grave at the Jewish cemetery
http://www.yadvashem.org/untoldstories/database/murderSite.asp?site_id=389

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/bar.html

Ghetto
http://www.yadvashem.org/untoldstories/database/murderSite.asp?site_id=373

Photos
http://www.flickr.com/photos/9679871@N04/875578151/


Baranovichi

Had a population of 22,848. It was a rail junction and manufacturing center and had a teacher's college.

Chester G. Cohen's
"Shtetl Finder Gazetteer"
states that Baranovichi was authorized for Jewish residence in 1903.

Yizkor Book


Belaya Tserkov

Located south of Kiev


Belgorod-Dnestrovsky  (Bilgorod-Dnistrovskiy)


Beliivka (Belilovka)

A small settlement in the former Kiev Guberniya, today in Zhitomir oblast. It is located southwest of Kiev


Belozerka

Located 317.6 km west southwest of Kiev


Belz  (See Polish Shtetls)


Berdichev (Berdychiv, Berdichiv, Berdiciv, Berdychiv)

     

 Berdichev Cemetery where my half brother Moshe is buried.  This is a 'non religious' cemetery for both Jews and Gentiles.  Pictured is his tombstone.  Note his picture which is very common in Russian and Ukrainian on cemetery tombstones.

The Berdichev' s Jewish population increased mostly in the 1700s, but was a very small minority until then. There still is a small Jewish community, with a Rabbi, still existing in this town. Located west of Kiev

I visited this small city and was unimpressed, though I recently learned that this was the site of the first major massacre conducted by the Nazis after entering Ukraine.  I found my half brother's grave in the community cemetery in this town. Moshe, my half brother, was a decorated hero having fought at Stalingrad.  He died in Berdichev five years before I had found out that this is where he had retired to after WW II - Ted Margulis
http://www.berdichev.org/berdichevs_jewish_cemetery.html


Books  
             

"The Bones of Berdichev"
which goes into great detail about this larger town.  There is a Berdichev List Manager, Jeanne Gold who monitors a list at
http://berdichev.digging4roots.com


"The World of a Hasidic Master: Levi Yitzhak of Berdichev",
Authored by Samuel H. Dresner (Ch. 8, citation 5),  a passage was cited from the book,
"Siftei Tzadikkim" Published in Lemberg (L'viv) in 1863, and republished in Brooklyn, N.Y. in 1996/1997. Author was Pinhas of Dinovitz.


A brief, imagined and unflattering description of Berdichev Jews is at
http://www.sholom-aleichem.org/why_jews_need2.htm/
 

Check out the Berdichev-D Digest
Send an email to
BERDICHEV-L@rootsweb.com
 

Another site that offers a statistical review of "Berditschew Artificers" taken from an 1844 edition of "Allgemeine Zeitung des Judentums," and mentions the number of participants in each of the various trades to be found among the then 30,000 Jewish inhabitants
http://jewish-history.com/Occident/volume2/nov1844/berditcchew.html

In the "Berditschew Artificers" it states: "In Berditschew, a town containing about 30,000 Jewish inhabitants, there are nine merchants of the first, twelve of the second, and about 500 of the third rank.  There are 274 corn handlers, 205 butchers, and a great many fish, fruit and vegetable salesmen.  There are builders, dyers, three engravers, forty goldsmiths, six painters, seventeen watchmakers, thirty musicians."

The war crimes trial files from the German Embassy in Washington, D.C. concerning Engelbert Kreuzer, who was involved in the massacre of 1,000 Jews in Berdichev in 1941.  He was tried in a German court in 1970/71 and sentenced to seven years for his role in the massacres of many Ukrainian Jewish communities.  The files contain 10 pages in German containing information on the atrocities in Berdechev. Paul W. Ginsburg, Webmaster of the Sudilkov On-line Landsmanshaft site offers to mail copies of these 10 pages to anyone who can translate German and disseminate to your group.
http://www.sudilkov.com


An Index of 280 Jewish Persons mentioned in "The Town of Berdechev" which was edited by Baruch Kharu (Krupnick) in Tel Aviv in 1951 and indexed by Yael Driver.  Contact Yael at drivery@netcomuk.co.uk for a copy of the list.

Berdichev
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/berdichev/berdichev1.html

Berdichev-L Archives
http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/BERDICHEV/2000-09/0969208347 

Berdichev Discussion Group
http://berdichev.digging4roots.com

Regional Special Interest Groups:
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

A movie (in black and white with subtitles) , 'Komissar' is a work of visual and literary art that symbolically speaks to Jewish past and future of time depicted and was banned in 1962, when it was produced, according to Diane Kriegman Claussen didado@mindspring.com


Berdyansk (Berdiansk, Berdyansi'k)

Holocaust
There is a Holocaust Memorial outside of the town
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Colonies_of_Ukraine/berdyansk.htm


Books  
             

'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html


Beregovo


Berets

Previously located in the Novy Sanch county.  There were a total of 38,500 residents of which 2,620 were Jews.  In the town itself, there were 20 Jews.


Berezhany

     

 

 

 

Berezhany is a city located in the Ternopil Oblast of western Ukraine. It is the administrative center of Berezhanskyi Raion, and lies about 100 km from Lviv and 50 km from the oblast capital, Ternopil. Wikipedia
Located in the Ternopol Oblast.  Berezhany is the Ukrainian name; in the Polish language and the name it had during Austrian period is Brzezany, with the 'z' having a dot above it (a diacritical mark)

Families

Leiser Bezahler (c.1803 - 1877)

Abraham Leber

Fischel Leber

Chaim Wolf Leber (c.1850 - 1894)

Abraham Leber

Fischel Leber

Hersch Mantel (c.1882 - d.)

Leon Mantel (c.1876 - 1963)

Jacob Mantel (c.1872 - d.)

Chaim Mantel (1864 - 1864)

Riwke Mantel (1862 - 1863)

Samuel Mendel Mantel (c.1839 - 1884)

Celia Mantel (c.1879 - d.)

Elias Podoszyn (c.1866 - d.)

Chaje Rubinzahl (c.1860 - d.)

Malie Schmier (c.1868 - d.)

Hamlets and Villages of the Berezhany area

Narayiv - ca. 14 km

Kozova - ca. 20 km

Rohatyn - ca. 30 km

Pidhaytsi - ca. 25 km

Peremyshliany - ca. 40 km

Burshtyn - ca. 40 km

Halych - ca. 50 km

Ternopil - ca. 60 km

Lviv - ca. 90 km

Ivano-Frankivsk - ca. 60 km

Zavaliv - ca. 35 km

Zboriv - ca. 35 km
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/zemla.htm

Registry Office (RAHS)
Office is located in the town.  Records may also be found in the Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine in L'viv (TsDIA-L'viv).

Yizkor Book
"Brezezany, Narajow ve-ha-Seviva; Toldot Kehillot she-Nehrevu"

(Brzezany Memorial Book) There are 1,269 entries

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Yizkor

The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs -- published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the Yizkor Book Project site at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
 

This database is only an index of names; it directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more complete information may be available. This database currently contains over 186,000 entries from the necrologies of 210 different Yizkor Books.

Memorial page to bygone world of Berezhany Jews
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/brzezaner.htm


Berezovka (Beresovka, Berezovke, Berozovka)

A town in Odessa Oblast and 88 km from Odessa.  Early records indicate that Jews lived there, or in nearby Nikolayev since 1794.  

Cemetery
There is still a Jewish cemetery, located at 127 East Tanastyshina Street. 

Pogrom
A pogrom was instigated on April 4, 1881 and out of 161 buildings owned by Jews, only the Synagogue and a pharmacy were untouched.  Another pogrom in October, 1905 was stopped by the local residents.  In 1897 there were 3,458 Jews, nearly 57% of the residents and in 1926 there were 3,223 or 42.3%.


Bershad

A town in Vinnitsa oblast, approximately midway between Kiev and Odessa, and slightly to the west near the Bug river.


Books  
             

"The Shtetl: Image and Reality"
Edited by Gennady Estraikh and Mikhail Krutikov and published by The University of Oxford in 2000, Alla Sokolova's study is entitled "The Podolian Shtetl as Architectural Phenomenon."  The author describes the general layout of the town and discusses the architecture and interiors of many of the buildings she visited.


Bialoholovy (Bialoglowy - Poland)

Research
Ternopol Oblast Archives
has data on this village.  Write (preferably in Ukrainian or Russian, though English will probably work) to:

UKRAINA, 282000, Ternopol,
vul. Sahaidachnoho 14,
Derzhavnyi Arkhiv Ternopilskoi Oblasti  

The
Director is Bogdan Khavarivsky. 
Phone: 0352 224495  Fax: 0352 228618 


Bihali / Bihale area

In 1785 there were 346 Greek Catholics, 120 Roman Catholics and 6 Jews. In 1938, there were 2,234 Greek Catholics, 1,500 Roman Catholics and 75 Jews.  Most of the Greek Catholics were probably Ukrainians and most of the Roman Catholics were Poles.


Bila Tserkva (Belaya Tserkov)

A number of Bila Tserkva web sites (some in English). Preceding the Russian Revolution and until the 1930s, there was a significant Jewish community in Bila Tserkva. Some of them were driven out by Cossacks and Tzarist policies. Many were driven out in the Stalinist purges. Most remnants were destroyed during the Holocaust and other losses during the World War II.
http://ukrainetrek.com/bila_tserkva-city

 
Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/bila-tserkva-kiev.html


Bistra

Located in northeast of Horinchovo Verovyna-Bystra is near the headwater of the San river.
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Maramures/mar455.html

http://www.carpatho-rusyn.org/villages.htm


Bobrka (G) - (Bibrka, Bobree, Bobrice

Bobrice is a grammatical form of Bobrka.  There are three different towns of Bobrka in three different administrative districts of: Bobrka; Krosno and Lisko.  Note that Bobrka spells with an accent over the 'o'.  Bobrka was formerly Galicia (near Lemberg) and now in Ukraine. A Yizkor book exists and much of the information appears to be from Landesarchiv in Vienna.  The City Hall was destroyed in WW1.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bobrka/default.htm

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/lviv.htm

http://www.jewish-guide.pl/sites/33

Postcards
Contact is Beverly Shulster
bevshul@gmail.com Beverly has a picture postcard entitled "Rynek w Bobree" and a picture of the local market in the town where her father was born.

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information is available
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"
Le-Zeykher Kehillot Bobrka u-Benoteha" (Boiberke Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 


Bogopol   (Pervomaysk)

It is located near the Bug River.  Bogopol, Olviopol, and Golta were merged into the city of Pervomaysk in 1919.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=980CE7DC153AE733A25752C0A9649D946497D6CF

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1050242


Boguslav (Boslov)

The name of this town means "Glory to the God" in several Slavic languagesBoguslav had a large Jewish pre-war population of over six thousand.

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html

 
http://www.mrt5.com/boguslav/boguslav.html


Bohorodczany (G)  (Bohorodchangy, Bogorodchany, Bohorodchany, or Bohordczany

At one time it was a part of the Poland Kingdom, but today, it is in Ukraine.  It was an administrative center and is located about 20 km. southwest of Stanislawow (Ivano-Frankivsk). A map of the city and area is available.  Type in the name of the city and the country.  Contact is Susannah R. Juni 
http://www.mapquest.com

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Bolekhiv (G)  (Bolechov, Bolechow, Bolekhov, Bolekhev)

This is a shtetl that is close to Ivano Frankiv'sk (Stanislawow) which had a thriving Jewish community with four synagogues prior to WW II. On August 25, 1943 3,200 Jews were deported from Bolechov to Stanislavov.  On September 3, 1942, 2,000 Jews from Bolechov were deported to Belzec.  It is about an hour and a half from L'vov.

"Maskalim and Haskala (Enlightenment) Movement in Bolekhiv in the 19th Century".
There is a translation of a 35 page chapter by Dr. M. Hendel  This movement influenced the lives of many of our ancestors.

Cemetery
The Jewish Cemetery in this shtetl is in poor condition and contains many mass graves.

Photos, Maps
A story of a trip to the shtetl and more research information.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bolekhov/index.htm


http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bolekhov/res_sum.html
 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bolekhov/

www.bolechow.org/

http://bolechow.ajmendelsohn.com/html/bolechow.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
The Mormon Family History Library (FHL) has microfilmed records of this town - some as far back as 1776.  You may want to check the Roman Catholic Parish Records since sometimes Jewish Vital records are co-mingled with Parish Records. 
http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html
 

Yizkor Book
"Sefer ha-Zikaron le-Kedoshei Bolechow"
(Memorial Book of the Martyrs of Bolechow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 


Bolshiye Mosty (Velikiye Mosty)

Following the end of WWII, this town was known in Russian as Bolshiye Mosty, and currently town is renamed in Ukrainian as Velikiye Mosty which is direct translation of its German or Polish name of "The Tall Bridges".

The town is located at 5014 2409 on the Rata River, contributory of the Western Bug River, about a halfway between Zolkva (Z'olkiew) and Chervonograd (Krystynopol) on the highway #A256.

Another small Jewish shtetl known as Mosty Male (The Little Bridges) is located in the vicinity over the nearby border in Poland.


Bolshovtsy

Holocaust
"
List of Soviet Citizens Shot By German-Fascist Occupants and their Confederates of Bolshowetsky Raion, Stanislau Oblast" 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 


Bolszowce (Bolshovtsy)

This shtetl was at one time in Galicia, now currently Bolshovtsy


Borislav (G) (Boryslaw, Borislaw)

Located in the western part of Ukraine in the L'vov district and was an important Jewish town in Eastern Galicia prior to WW II.  It is 200 km from Krosno.

A Jew, Abraham Schreiner, who owned land in the area, discovered a "greasy, tarry secretion" known as ozokerite and which later made the area well-known for its crude oil production.

Cemetery

There is a Jewish cemetery in existence for the past 200 years.  More information about the cemetery can be obtained from William Fern
Whfern@aol.com  

Holocaust
The Nazis destroyed the Jewish Community on February 24th.  There are currently some 40 Jews, the majority originally from other cities and towns in the former USSR and who are married to Gentile Ukrainians.
http://www.genealogyontheweb.com/wordpress/2012/01/05/holocaust
-ukraine-borislav-utility-records-1941-1942/

Regional Special Interest
The Town Leader is Alexander Sharon  or Mark Halpern, AGAD Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland
willie46@aol.com  Groups: Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html  

Research
Currently being indexed by JRI-Poland are Birth records from 1878-1889 and 1894-1899 and Deaths from 1878-1899.   Included in the Boryslaw records are records for Dolhe, Kropiwinik Nowy, Kropiwinik Stary, Lastowki, Majdan, Mraznica, Rybnik, Schodnica, Tustanowice and Wolanka. 

Yizkor Book

"Tys'mienica Nadai Plynie"
(As the Tys'mienica Flows) translation is available. Contact is Laurel White.
http://www.jewishgen.org//yizkor/translations.html 

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Drohobycz/dro171.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html 


Borshchiv (G)  (Borschev, Borszczo'w the Ukrainian name- Borszczow is the Polish name and was the
                                  Austrian place name, Borshchev was the Soviet era place name.)
 

It is near Cziortko'w currently known as Chortkov.  The town name "Borszczow"  is associated with the Borszcz (Barszcz or Borscht), the beetroot soup.

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Borshchovichi

Yizkor Book
"Khurbn Jaryczow bay Lemberg; Sefer Zikaron le-Keoshei Jaryczow y-Sevivoteha"

(Destruction of Jaryczow: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Jarczow and Surroundings Ukraine)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Borynychi

Research
These are Jewish sounding names of soldiers who came from this village and were listed as being dead - Koval, Sharan.  This information was obtained from a book of military deaths owned by Edward Drebot


Boryspil


Borzna

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

ShtetLinks
http://shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/borzna/borzna.htm


Bosivka (Bosovka)

Located 106.3 miles south southwest of Kiev


Boyarka

Located in the Kiev Guberniya and in 1897 it had a population of 1,793 with 720 being Jews


Breslov

A Chassidic Shtetl west of Uman along the Bug River. Terhevitsa, Zlatipolia, Gusyatin, Shpola, Kaniblad, Tcherin, Medvedovka are a group of towns to the east of Breslov and not far from a lake.  Across the lake is Kremenchug.  Rabbi Nachman' s main disciple is buried here.  A good deal of information can be found at this site
http://www.breslov.org/index.html

http://www.breslov.com/en/index.php/The_Breslov_Directory


Brody (G)

Located in Brodivs'kyi Raion, L'vivska Oblast. It is about 90 km NE of L'viv.
Marjorie Rosenfeld
marjorierosenfeld@sbcglobal.net  has a Brody web site.  She has finished the 17th through the 19th century records translations and is now developing the 20th century records.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Brody/brody.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
information is available
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Synagogue
Photo of old fortress synagogue 
http://members.tripod.com/~mikerosenzweig/polsynagog.htm

Yizkor Book
"Ner TamidYizkor le Brody"
An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam 
http://resources.ushmm.org/hsv/source_view.php?SourceId=33282

Yizkor Book Photographs
The Brody (Ukraine) Yizkor Book website hosted by JewishGen has added some photographs to their site.   The photographs were obtained from Records Administration (NARA) cartographic collection of the Defense Intelligence Agency Record 373 of Captured German World War II photographs.
Yizkor Book Database


Broshnev

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bolekhov/index.htm


Brovary


Bryanka


Bryansk

Had a Jewish presence and does have an Archive


Buchach (G) (Bucac, Buczacz)  

Located about 40 miles east of Ivano-Frankivsk by the Strypa River and near Brzezany.  It is a county seat with a population of over 15,000. This shtetl had a strong, but small Jewish community and many of its citizens emigrated to the US.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_buczacz.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information is available
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
It is quite possible that the historical Roman Catholic parish records, for this shtetl, as well as Dobrowody and Monasterzyska, and Pidhaitsi are now in the archives of Poland - specifically the Archives of the Presidium of the National Workers Council and the parish records are called the Zabuzanski Collection.  If the Dobrowody and Monasterzyska Roman Catholic parish records are not in the Zabuzanski Collection, then you will have to see if the Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine has the records.
http://www.halgal.com/archivesineurope.html

Yizkor Book
The table of contents of Sefer Buczacz has been translated into English and is available
http://www.jewishgen.org//yizkor/  

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/buchach/buchach.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Buczacz

There are several hundred Jews living in the communities of Stanislawow and the Rabbi name is Moshe Leib Kolesnik, a local man, trained by Chabad in Moscow.  He also helps the smaller Jewish communities of Kolomyya and Buczacz. 

Yizkor Book
"
Sefer Buczacz; Matsevet Zikaron le-Kehila Kedosha" (Book of Buczacz; In Memory of a Martyred Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Budanov (G)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information
is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html


Bukachevtsy  (Bukaczowce) Galicia

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 

ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bukaczowce/bukmain.htm


Bun'kovychi

     Located in a fairly wide river valley near the Carpathian Mountains and very close to Khyriv, another town.  


Maps

http://lemko.org/maps100/Pages/Pg66.html 


Burakuvla (G)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Burshtyn


 
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jewish_headstones_in_Burshtyn.JPG

 http://www.jewishgalicia.net/website/modules/database/Item.aspx?type=9&id=20&pid=407

 www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 


Bushchyno (Bushtyna, Bushtino)

The Rusyn name for Bustyahaza.  Bustyahaza was the former Magyar (Hungarian) name.  During the Soviet period, it had the spelling Bushtyna, which is also the current Ukrainian spelling.  Bushtino was the former Czechoslovak official place name.


Busk (G)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Butsnevtsy (Butsni)

This town is mentioned in
"
The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Chechelnik (Chitchilnik)

Webmaster Ariel Parkansky
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/chechelnik/


Chelguzov

186.9 miles west of Kiev and located in the Khmelnytska oblast


Cemeryntsi

Located in the country of Peremyshlany, L'viv province.  It is about 40 miles southeast by east of L'viv and about 10 miles east of Peremyshlany.


Cesanyky (Czesniki in Polish)

Located about 5 miles southeast of Rohatyn which is about 50 miles southeast of L'viv and 45 miles north of Ivano-Frankivsk. At one time it had over 1,800 inhabitants, but only a few Jews.


Cetatea Alba, city, Odessa Oblast (province)  Akkerman, Belgorod - Dnestrovsky

Located in southernmost Ukraine.  In Turkish it is known as Akkerman and in Russian as Belgorod-Dnestrovsky.  There is a lot of historical information available
http://www.britannica.com/seo/b/bilhorod-dnistrovskyy/


Chelmniecki 

Cemetery
There is a small, neglected Jewish cemetery in what is now called Chelmniecki, Ukraine.

History
Israel Friedlander and Bernard Cantor were Jewish emissaries from the US in the early 20th century, who were murdered while on a mercy mission The body of Israel Friedlander was re-interred in Israel in about 2001 and that of Bernard Cantor was left in Yarmolinitsy. This information was offered by Ruthie Ben-Mayor.
http://www.jdc.org/news_press_100103.html


Chemerovitz - (Chernerovtsy, or Czemerowce)

Located near Kamenets-Podol'sk


Chernihiv (Chernigov)

Located in the Chernihivska Oblast (population of the oblast: 1,416,000)and its administrative center in the northern Dnepr lowlands in Ukraine. The city of Chernigov is situated on the right bank of the navigable Disna River.  The population in 1989 was 296,000.  It is one of the oldest, and important cities in the country and records go back to a.d. 907. The name of a Guberniya (province), and was also the capital city of that province.
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/ru-pale.txt

Archive
Contains Jewish records including records from surrounding towns.

Photos
 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html

Research
A database of record is currently being developed, and further information can be obtained at  
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/k.net
 

Research Group
For Chernigov researchers, there is a Chernigov Research Group (probably the largest research of it's kind).  Their email address  list with a description of the group
http://lists.rootsweb.com/index/intl/UKR/UKR-CHERNIGOV.html


Cherkassy (Cherkassy, Cherkoss, Czerkasy)

Located in the Cherkaska Oblast. It is a gray Ukrainian industrial city about two hours outside Kiev with about 300,000 residents and 4,000 to 5,000 Jews.  A database of records is currently being developed, and further information can be obtained at  
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
 

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/cherkasy/


Maps

Cherkaska Oblast Map
http://www.rootsweb.com/~ukrwgw/cherkaskamap.html


http://genconnect.rootsweb.com/index/Ukraine.html

http://cgi.rootsweb.com/~genbbs.cgi/Ukraine/Cherkaska

Photo Gallery

See also a photo gallery entitled
'The
Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html


Cherkaska Oblast Ukraine
Queries from those researching this Oblast.


Chernivtsi (Chernowitz)

Located in Chernivetska Oblast is in eastern Ukraine

Archive
Chernivtsi - has an Oblast archive
http://www.huri.harvard.edu/abb_grimsted/O-5.html


Books  
             

"The Shtetl: Image and Reality"
Edited by Gennady Estraikh and Mikhail Krutikov and published by The University of Oxford in 2000, Alla Sokolova's study is entitled
"
The
Podolian Shtetl as Architectural Phenomenon."  The author describes the general layout of the town and discusses the architecture and interiors of many of the buildings she visited.


Research
A database is available. The Chernivtsi Archives has Bukovina records.
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
  

The LDS Family History Library has Jewish records for Chernivtsi and is currently filming these records. 

Maps

Chernivtsi City Map
http://www.lemko.org/maps/cities/index.html

Photos
See also a photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html


Chernobyl (Chornobyl)

Radomysl' Uyezd Kiev Guberniya.  Known now because of the nuclear power plant disaster.  The fallout was 400 times greater than that of the Hiroshima bombing. More than 300,000 people were evacuated.  Following the disaster, a 17 mile zone of exclusion was created around the city.  The land can't be used because of contamination. Photos, taken by Swiss photographer Timm Suess can be seen at this site.  The subjects are bleak, but the photos are beautiful.  Many are high-dynamic range images.  Nobody is supposed to live in the zone of exclusion, but people do still live there.  Remember that when you view the photos.
http://www.russiatoday.com/Top_News/2009-04-26/Chernobyl__23_years_later.html?gclid=CNi7tcD84ZsCFQtN5QodD1Bc-w


Chernorudka

A small village located on the edge of Berdichev


Chervonoe

Census
First available census: Revizskaya Skazka 1816. Next available census (Revizskaya Skazka 1834) In 1850 census


Chervonoarmeisk  (Chervonoarmiis'ke, Radzivylov)

It is about 88 kilometers southwest of Rivne, formerly known as Radzivylov.


Chervonograd  (Cervonograd, Chervonohrad)


Chmielnik (Chmielnik)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Contact Herbert Lazerow.
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
information is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Chop

Located in Uzhhorods'kyi Raion, Zakarpats'ka Oblast


Chopovichi

Located in Zhitomir province, 16 miles southeast of Korosten, near road #A225 (Korosten - Kyiv road)


Chorostkow (Khorostkiv, Khorostkov, Chorostkov)

Located about 30 km from Husiatyn (Husyatyn)  and 110 km. from Chernivtsi with a population of about 20,000


Chortkov (G) (Chortkiv, Czortkow )

14430308768811857796.JPG

 A group photo of a Hachshara group of the Dror Habonim youth movement, 23/04/1935. 

Located south of Terebovlya and until 1945, was in Poland. In the past Chortkiv was the home of many Hasidic Jews; it was a notable shtetl and had a significant number of Jews residing there prior to the Holocaust. Today, Chortkiv is a regional commercial and small-scale manufacturing center. Among its architectural monuments is a fortress built in the 16th and 17th centuries
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chortkiv

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0004_
0_04277.html


Books

"Chortkov Remembered: The Annihilation of a Jewish Community" 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

"The  Rebbes of  Chortkov"
http://www.kosherpages.com/site/node/264

http://www.kosherpages.com/site/node/264

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_czortkow.htm

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Yizkor le-hantsahat Kedoshei Kehillot Czerkow"
(Memorial Book of Czerkow)
The Table of Contents and Necrology and text of the English chapters have been translated
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor
 

 

Crimea

This is not a city, but a region that is a beautiful peninsular resort area on the Black Sea
 


Books

"The Crimean Circle"
Authored by David Kushner
http://www.crimeancircle.com

 


Travel and Tourism  ( See also  Traveling  page)
http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/ukraine.htm


Czernowitz  (Chernovitsy) - (see also Chemerovitz

Willy Pragher Photos

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/Popovici.html

About 50,000 Jews lived in this city before WW II and they represented Assimilationists, Zionists, Bundists, Yiddishists and a large Hasidic community. Jews began flocking to the area after the annexation of Bukovina to the Hapsburg Empire in 1774.  The Jews adopted Hapsburger German, kneading it in a manner that made it either Bukovinian or Czernowitzian. After WW II, it became a "gray" Ukrainian city, lacking the Jews who had carried their German culture into the heart of Eastern Europe.

The town had an extensive middle class: merchants, industrialists, doctors, lawyers and journalists, many of them consumers of culture. There were neighborhoods inhabited by traditional Jews, mostly in the city's poorer sections, and there was a certain amount of tension between the religiously observant and the assimilating class.  Some of the information obtained from an article in Haaretz authored by Aharon Appelfeld and published in the American Jewish World, April 18 2008 edition.


Books  
             

"My Czernowitz"
Authored by Zvi Yavetz, an emeritus professor of ancient history at Tel Aviv University.


"Terracotta Ovens Of My Childhood
Authored by Elite Olshtain.  A story of a little Jewish girl who survived the Holocaust by staying with her grandmother in the Czernowitz Ghetto, while her father fought in the Red Army and her mother was in a concentration camp.


Regional Special Interest Groups: Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
Information is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html

http://www.ibiblio.org/yiddish/Places/Czernowitz

Research
Directory for Czernowitz and its Suburbs - For the Year 1898
Österreichische Nationalbibliothek:
http://czernowitz.blogspot.com/2008/11/directory-for-czernowitz-and-its.html

Chernivetska Oblast Records
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ukrwgw/cherni/chernirecords.htm


Dashiev (Dashev,Dosha)


http://jewua.info/tag/dashev/

Located southwest of Kiev and southeast of Vinitza and was in the east Vinitza Oblast.  It had a population in 1920 of 5,481. Until 1930, it was known as Stary
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Dashev/

Research
There may be documents about the destruction of the region's Jews stored in the Vinitza Archives. Possible contact is Igor Desner vinjew@sovamuz.com
 


Dbuosary

There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives


Debeslavtsi

Southeast of Kolomyia


  Map

A map is available at
http://www.mapquest.com/
 


Debno

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
- Contact Elaine Rosenberg 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Dedilov

Yizkor Book
"Khurbn Jaryczow bay Lemberg: Sefer Zikaron le Keshoshei Jaryczow y-Sevivoteha" 
(Destruction of Jaryczow: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Jarczow and Surroundings Ukraine)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Deliiv  (Polish and Austrian  name was Delejow; Deleyuv, Deliyeve, Deliyevo)

268.2 miles WSW of Kyyiv 

Research
http://www.feefhs.org/links/Poland/kmsc/kmsc-df.html

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetlexp5


Delyatin   (including Dora and Lanchin) (G)

Holocaust
"List of Soviet Citizens of Delyatin Shot by German-Fascist Invaders"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Derazhnia


Books  
             

This town is mentioned in
"
The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Dervenia  


Maps

A map of the area is available
http://www.mapquest.com/cgibin/ia_free?width=500&height=300&level=58lat=501500&Ing=    


Dnepropetrovsk

Jewish Community
http://www.fjc.ru/news/archives.asp


Dobromil

Dobromil was once in Austria, then Galicia and now in Ukraine.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dobromil


http://www.traveljournals.net/stories/17630.html


Dolina  (Galicia)

ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Dolina/

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 

Yizkor Book
translations.html


Dolynka

DSC07288
Dolynka Mass Grave
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=103&p17
_imageid=1778


Dolzanka

Located in the Tarnopol District


Drogobych (Drohobitch) (Galicia)

ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/drogobych/drogobych.html


Dubova

Cemetery

P1010035
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=104&p17
_imageid=1781


Dzigovka


Books  
             

"The Shtetl: Image and Reality"
Edited by Gennady Estraikh and Mikhail Krutikov and published by The University of Oxford in 2000, Alla Sokolova's study is entitled
"
The
Podolian Shtetl as Architectural Phenomenon."  The author describes the general layout of the town and discusses the architecture and interiors of many of the buildings she visited.


Dnipropetrovs'k   (Yekaterinoslav, Ekaterinoslav - now Ukraine)

  

The city of Dniepropetrovsk (UKR.) or Dnepropetrovsk (Russian) is situated on the Dnieper River (Dnepr or Dnipro) in East-Central Ukraine has a population of 1.1 million. 

The old fortress settlement has existed since the middle of the 16th century. The new town was founded in 1776 by the Russian Prince, Potemkin by order of Catherine II, Empress of the Russian Empire and was called Yekaterinoslav (Ekaterinoslav) from 1776 to 1926.

It is renamed Dniepropetrovsk. Located in the Dnipropetrovska Oblast and is located at coordinates 48 degrees 30 minutes latitude and 34 degrees 59 minutes longitude. Ekaterinoslav (variant spellings are Yekaterinoslav and Keterinoslav) which is now known as Dnepropetrovsk. During 1918 the town's name was Sicheslav (The Glory for Sich/Fortress of Cossacks). At one time this community had a Jewish community numbering in the tens of thousands. You could find pictures and much more information on the site. Eilat Gordin Levitan from a posting on JewishGen. Ekaterinoslav was a settlement of former Litvak Jews
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dnipropetrovsk

Archives (State) of the Dniepropetrovsk Region
The page and its contents are in PDF file style
http://www.archives.gov.ua/Eng/Archives/ra04.php#Hystory

Community
Jewish Community Center
Located at
4 Sholom-Aleichem Str.
Phone +380 (562) 362983 Fax: 362985 
Email: 
jcc@jcc.dp.ua
http://djc.com.ua/index.aspx?page=content&mnu=1&type=History&lang=en

Dnepropetrovsk Kehilla Project
http://www.jcrcboston.org/focus/strength/dkp/

History
http://www.mymishpocha.net/locales/ekat_home.htm

Ekaterinoslav
Index to Surnames from Ekaterinoslav
and surrounding towns
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Coloniesof_Ukraine/surnamelist.htm

Photos
A photo gallery - 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://euroscopeusa.com/legacy_site/jewishworld.html

Records
A database of records
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
 

Travel
Dnepropetrovsk Travel and Tourism

Ukraine's third largest city
http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Ukraine/Dnipropetrovska_Oblast
/Dnipropetrovsk-713225/TravelGuide-Dnipropetrovsk.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.mymishpocha.net/locales/dnep_yizkor_toc.htm


Dobromil

Research
Land records are at the L'viv Archives for most of the 19th century. Przemysl Archives has a variety of records over many years beginning with 1870
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Bolekhov/index.htm

Jewish Birth, Marriage and Death records
reside at the L'viv archives according to Kahlile Mehr, the Ukraine expert, who works for the Family History Library of Salt Lake City, Utah.


Dolina (G)  (Dolena, Dolyna)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
Located in the Tovmach region of GaliciaThere is a Yizkor Book that is being translated.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/stanislawow/gen/towns.htm


Donetsk (G) (Yozuvka, Stalino)

Located in the Donetska Oblast. In the past it was known as both Yozuvka and in the mid 30s as Stalino.  It is in the Belarus Indexes and more of a conglomerate of many towns, and very similar in nature to the Polish Upper Silesia regions where several mining towns were built around foundries and coal mines. It is west of Ivano Frankivsk.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0012_0_11089.html

http://ukrainetrek.com/donetsk-city

Photos
See also a photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry' 
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
information
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
A database of record is currently being developed, and further information can be obtained at  
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
 


Dnipropetrovs'k  (see Ekaterinoslav)


Dniprodzerzhyns'k

A number of Dniprodzerzhyns'k web sites (some in English)


Drohobycz (G) (Drogobych, Drubich, Drogobic, Drohobitch)- (Once in Eastern Galicia, now Drogobych, in
                                Western  Ukraine
)

There are approximately 400 or so Jews still living in this town
http://www.britannica.com/seo/d/drohobych/
 

Drohobycz Administrative District
At this excellent website, Valerie Schatzker has offered an insight into the lifestyle of the Jews of the area and the petroleum industry.  Included in the records for this Administrative center are the vital records for nearby smaller towns and villages.  Contact the town leader for further information: Carole Glick Feinberg feincgs@cs.comdz_histoil.htm

Information on both the town and the Drohobych district
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm

This town was formerly in Galicia.  For additional information, please Jewish Genealogy to go to my web page  Galicia

Cemetery lists

Holocaust
Deportation of the Jews to Belzec death camp.  Between 1942 and 1943, the Nazis deported 10,000 Jews from Drogobych to Belzec death camp.  Of a prewar Jewish community of 15,000, only a few Jews survived. 
http://motic.wiesenthal.com/gallery/pg19/pg3/pg19368.html
 

Photographs

Additional information at my Ukrainian web page by clicking here Ukraine

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information. Contact is Laurel E. White
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
1929 Business Directory of Poland
Pre-war telephone books;
L'viv oblast in western Ukraine. About 25,200 vital records are available at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw and indexed by JRI-Poland: 

http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1440

Births
: 1877-1897  
Marriages: 1877-1881, 1884-1897, (1886-1891, 1893-1897);  
Deaths:  1852-1896 

Vital records are available at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw and is indexed by JRI-Poland: 
Births: 1877-1897 
Marriages: 1877-1881, 1184, 1886-1891, 1893-1897; 
Deaths:  1852-1896

Town information
For anyone interested in this shtetl, as well as Boryslaw/Borislav, Sambor, Stary Sambor, Dobromil and the many smaller settlements in this part of Western Ukraine, you are invited to subscribe to the BDS&V (V=vicinity) research group.  To learn about BDS&V go to InfoFiles on JewishGen
www.jewishgen.org
 

Under 'Learn', click on "JewishGen InfoFiles"' under 'Countries' click on 'Ukraine' and then locate the Borislav, Drogobych, Sambor and vicinity research group. 
Contact: Carole Glick Feinberg feincgs@mindspring.com
 

Synagogue 
http://members.tripod.com/~mikerosenzweig/polsynagog.htm
 

Yizkor Book
A translation of the "Sefer Zikaron le-Drohobycz, Broyslaw ve-ha-Seviva" (Memorial Book of Drohobycz, Boryslaw and Surrounding towns")


Druzhikivka (Druzhkovka)

http://www.jewnet.ru/eng/orgs/?region_id=85&profile_id=8&corp_id=0&action=search

Travel
http://www.travelpost.com/EU/Ukraine/Donetsk/Druzhkovka/2399480


Druzhkopol

Located in the Volhynia Guberniya

http://jewage.org/wiki/en/Special:MainPage

Discussion Forum
http://genforum.genealogy.com/ukraine/messages/5044.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/druzhkopol/dru082.html


Dubie

Dubie is a village (Selo) in Brodivsk Raion, L'viv Oblast in western Ukraine. Located about 12 km south of Brody and had more than 2,000 residences. From 1918 to 1939 the village was in Tarnopol
Voivodeship
in
Poland. Dubie (Dubye) is part of the Yaseniv rural council (bigger Yaseniv). The village had 337 inhabitable buildings and 2000 inhabitants, majority of the populace was Rusin (Ukrainian). The Polish populace was 180 and there were 25 Jews.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubie,_Lviv_Oblast

http://genforum.genealogy.com/ukraine/messages/7474.html

http://www.kresy.co.uk/brody_villages.html

Ellis Island Passenger List from Dubie
http://www.ellisisland.org/search/ship_passengers.asp?letter=m&half=1&sname=Main&year=1910&sdate=02/14/1910&port=Bremen&
page=1


Dubno

1939 Jewish population (census) was 5315.  Almost all of the 12,000 Jews living in the city at the time of WW II, most were systematically murdered by the Germans.  At the end of the war, there were only 300 Jews left.

Dubno has a history of Jewish presents for over 400 years and was considered one of the most important Jewish communities in Eastern Europe.  It was also the birthplace of the 18th century preacher Jacob Kranz, better known as the Dubner Maggid.


Books  
             

"Shards of War: Fleeing to and from Uzbekistan"
Authored by Michael G. Kesler.  Mr. Kesler traces his flight from his family's home just after the German attack on Russia in late June 1941 which prompted the parents of Michael who was 16 years old, along with his sister, to flee eastward.  He traces the family's traveling experiences where they found safety in Uzbekistan.  He then documents his experiences of living in Uzbekistan and later when both move to the United States where Michael and his sister raised families.


Cemetery
The landmarked Jewish cemetery was established in 1942. No other towns or villages used this cemetery. The suburban agricultural flat land, separate but near other cemeteries, has no sign or marker.
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/dubno.html

Yizkor Book
There are 1,562 entries
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Yizkor

The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs -- published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the Yizkor Book Project site at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
 

This database is only an index of names; it directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more complete information may be available. This database currently contains over 186,000 entries from the necrologies of 210 different Yizkor Books.


Dubovo

Cemetery
P1010036
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=104&p17_imageid=1787

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/03.html#6


Dunaevtsy (Dunaivtsi)


Books  
             


 "The
Road from Letichev"
 Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
 http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Photos
A photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html
 


Dymytrov (Dimitrov)


Dzerzhynsk


Dzhankoy


Ekaterinapol - see Katerinapol


Ekaterinoslav (Dnipropetrovs'k)

An industrial city in eastern Ukraine. The Jewish community of Dnipropetrovs’k, a city with a population of more than 1,000,000, was in decline at the end of the twentieth century, but remained one of the largest in Ukraine. According to the 2001 population census, the “core” Jewish population was 22,000. The “extended” Jewish population (those meeting the requirements of Israel’s Law of Return) was estimated between 35,000 and 50,000
http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Dnipropetrovsk

History
http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/27672887?uid=3739256&uid=2&uid=4&sid=21102512832277

Research
List of Jews Who had Moved to Ekaterinoslav Guberniya
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/colonies_of_ukraine/AppendixL.htm

http://yourjewishgem.blogspot.com/2013/05/1913-all-ekaterinoslavlots-midwives.html

http://yourjewishgem.blogspot.com/2013/05/1913-all-ekaterinoslav-veterinarians-4.html

Yizkor Book

Hillary Henkin has a copy of the Yizkor book Email:
hilary@mymishpocha.net


Elizabethgrad  (Kirovohrad)

Pogrom
There was a pogrom here in 1905


Elisavetgrad

Pogrom of May 15th to the 17th 1919
At the time, there was a Jewish population of 50,000
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/03.html#6


Energodar


Fakshtin

Records
There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives


Fastov (Fastiv)

Located 37 miles southwest of Kiev

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/03.html#6


Felshtin (Gvardeyskoye)

Felshtiner Landsleit
Newsletter of the Felshtin Society
http://www.west.net/~jazz/felshtin/biblio.html

www.west.net/~jazz/felshtin/

Chronological List of Archival Documents That Include Information About Felshtin
http://www.felshtin.org/resources/felshtinarchive.pdf


Books  
             

This town is mentioned in
"The
Road from Letichev"
 
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
 http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Pogrom
Felshtin
had a bloody pogrom of February 1919 and later a great famine and persecution until its destruction in the holocaust.

Yizkor book
A Yizkor book was published in New York in 1937.
This is a well documented web site. Offers links to a Yizkor Book; Documents and a Newsletter of the Felshtin Society 
http://www.west.net/~jazz/felshtin/biblio.html
 


Feodosia (Feodosiya)

Founded by the Greeks on the Black Sea. 


Gadyach

Site of the tomb of Rabbi Shneur Zalman, the Alter Rebbe who was the founder of the Lubavitch Chassidic movement.


Galych - (Galich)

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 


Gaspra


Gaysin


Books  
             

This town is mentioned in
"The
Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Gibany (Ghibanu)

In Russian, the letter that looks like "y" can be pronounced "u" and "h" can be a "g".  It is located about 75 miles southeast of Kiev.  For further information about this Moldavian shtetl, check out my Russian Empire page


Glinivce - (pronounced Hlinivce in Ukrainian)

Lies between Zhitomir and Berdichev and is also next to the town of Andrusivka.  It was the heart of the Pale of Settlements.


Glinyany

Yizkor Book
"
Khurbn Glinyane" (The Tragic End of our Gliniany) and "Megiles Gline" (The Scroll of Gline")
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Golovanevsk - (Golowaniesk, Golowanesk, Golovanisk, Golowansk, Kolowanisky, Galvenski, Golwanesk,
                                Golowamcik,   Galawinski, Golwansk,  Golowaniska, Golowanejsk, Galowensky, Galovanesky, Golwanick,
                                Glowanck,  Golowaniewsk, Holvanivsk
)

Podolia region. Until 1918 it was part of the Russian Empire but had an Ukrainian name. A map spells it Holvanivsk but it was  apparently spelled Holovanivsk.  There was a mini pogrom in 1904.                                                        

Cemetery
JewishGen cemeteries project spells it Holovanevsk.


Golta  (Holta) (Pervomaysk)


http://www.bfcollection.net/indphoto/bfc03018.html


http://www.picturepastime.com/?c=up&UF=-1039243&UN=-1539885&DG=PPLX

Located northwest of Odessa - which in 1920 together with it's two neighboring towns of Oliviopol and Bogopol was renamed as Pervomaysk
http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/

Names
Yelisavetsky
http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameResults.html?placeBirth=Golta&placeBirthType=LITERAL&language=en

Synagogue
http://www.flickr.com/photos/9679871@N04/1311426857/

 


Gorky  (City of ) (Nizhniy Novgorod)

Known in the past and again presently as Nizhniy Novgorod.


Gorlice, Poland

Contact: Marjorie Rosenfeld Email: marjorie.rosenfeld@cwix.com 

Research
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/gorlice/gorlice.htm
 


Gorlivka

A number of Gorlivka web sites (some in English)


Gorodek Jagiellonski

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Grayding" (Book of Griding (Grodek Jagiellonski) translation)
http://www.jewishgen.org//yizkor/translations.html
 


Gorodenka (G) (Horokenka)

Gorodenka (Galicia)
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Gorodenka/


Books  
             

"History of the Jews in the Bukowina,"
("Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina,")
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html


"List of Victims"
From documents of the Russian Commission, transliterated by Alexander Dunai and The Table of Contents and Necrology offered by Mark Heckman and Norman Berman
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
 


Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

A group of genealogists researching this town has been formed. 
http://shangrila.cs.ucdavis.edu:1234/heckman/gorodenka/pol-research.html

Research
This site has a list of the types of records available, a surname index for some of the records and estimated costs.
http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html
 

Yizkor Book
Table of Contents and Necrology
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Yizkor/

"Sefer Horodenka" and "List of Victims"
(List of Soviet Citizens of Horodenka Region Shot by German-Fascist Invaders
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
   


Gorodishche

Located south of Kiev and near Shpola

Cemetery


http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=106


Gorodnitsa (G)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Gorodok  (Horodok, Grodek Jagiellonski) (G)

The city code  is 211549. It is about 30 km north of Vitebsk on the Vitebsk - Pskov (Russia) road and is northeast from Minsk, which is about 265 km over the shortest road; more like 300 if you take 'major' roads.  It is 35 km E of Bialystok.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Gorodok/


Maps

The map spells this small city as Horodok and it is off the Minsk-Smolensk highway, close to Vitebsk

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives.
www.mapblast.com
 

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 


Gorokhov (Horchiv, Horchow)

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Horchow"
(Gorokhov) Memorial Book)

http://jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 

"History of the Jews in the Bukowina"
("Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina")
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html


Grafskoy


  House and farmyard, Grafskoy c.1908
http://melbourneblogger.blogspot.com/2014/01/jewish-agricultural-colonies-in-ukraine.html

http://chfreedman.blogspot.com/2010/07/jewish-agricultural-colonies-in-ukraine.html


Grebinki

Yizkor Book
"
Translation of Aunt Sophie's Letter"
http://www.jewishgen.org//yizkor/translations.html


Grimaylov (G)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Gritsev

Located about eight miles from Labun


Gulaipole   (Gulyapole, Guljai pole, Gulyaipole, Gulaipole)

A market town and county seat had a Jewish presence.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Colonies_of_Ukraine/gulaipole.htm


Gurzuph


Gusyatin (G) - (Husiatyn) (Galicia)

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_husiatyn.htm

History
A Brief History of the Jewish Community in Gusyatin, Ukraine
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Gusyatin/Gusyhist.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Gvardeyskoye (Felshtin)

See also Felshtin above. Newsletter of the Felshtin Society
http://www.west.net/~jazz/felshtin/

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Gwozdziec

Gwozdziec is included in the Kolbuszowa Region Research Group (KRRG). Shtetlach were interwoven together like a tapestry and the Jewish people of neighboring shtetlach linked by marriages, trade and marketing. They shared schools, cemeteries, kosher butchers, bakers and more. Smaller shtetlach registered their birth, marriages and death in a nearby larger shtetl. One should research the neighboring area as well as an individual shtetl. The KRRG web site has resources and information that is relevant to many shtetlach. To search for family links and learn more about neighboring shtetlach, please visit the Kolbuszowa Region Research Group (KRRG)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kolbuszowa/sl_gwozdziec.htm

Holocaust
http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/about/institute/killing_sites_catalog_details_full.asp?region=Stanislawow

Records Of Jews from the 17th and 18th Centuries
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2011-12/msg00034.html

Synagogue
The spectacular reconstruction of the roof and intricately painted ceiling of a 17th to 18th century wooden synagogue is displayed in the Jewish Museum in Warsaw.
http://www.jewishjournal.com/enroute/item/my_article_on_the_museum_
of_the_history_of_polish_jews_featured_in_hadassah

http://www.jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2013/03/12/replica-of-gwozdziec-synagogue-roof-installed-in-museum/%E2%80%9D

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kolbuszowa/sl_gwozdziec.htm


Halies (Halicz, Gallich

A major town in once Galicia where the name Gallich was originated from the town name of Halicz/Gallich, the capital of the medieval Rus Principality.  It is located less than 8 miles from Marinopol

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~autwgw/agsgai.htm


Hliboka

Located South of Cernovcy
http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hliboka

Research
Contact the Chernivtsi Oblast Archives and registry offices for your research. The L'viv Historical Archives has virtually nothing for towns that were formerly in the Bukowina area.


Hlubichok

Located in the rayon or district of Borshchiw and in the southern part of the Ternopil oblast

http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/pageload.cgi?FONT,COLOR::ukraine::10662.html


Horodenko (Gorodenko)

http://www.jewishgalicia.net/Gallery/Views%20of%20Horodenka.aspx


Hotin - (Khotyin, Chotin)

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Hotin/hotin.html 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Hryniv - (Polish = Hrynio'w, Gryniv)

Located near Bobrka.  May also be spelled Gryniv


  Maps

www.mapquest.com/cgi-bin/ia_free?width=500&height=300&level=5&lat=497000&lng=  

www.mapquest.com/cgi-bin/ia_find?screen+ia-map-form&link=ia-map-result&uid=u8          

Note: You can write a letter to the village council of Hryniv and ask them to contact your relatives, if any still reside there. There are some costs charged.


Husiatyn (Gusiatyn, Gusyatyn, Gusyatin, Husyatyn, Husiatyn)

Located on the Zbruch River. Some current maps by various mapmakers spell it as Gusyatin.  This area was in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, prior to the partitioning of Poland.  It was in the Republic of Poland between the world wars
https://sites.google.com/site/familyxroads/husiatyn

http://www.dmoz.org/Regional/Europe/Ukraine/Provinces/Ternopil_Oblast
/Husiatyn/

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/suchostaw/sl_husiatyn_landsmanshaftn.html

Photos
http://mwolter_galeria.republika.pl/galeria2.htm


 Iasin

 

A town in the Rachov district, on the train line connecting Kirghizia (Kirihaza). 

Holocaust
Photo is of German soldiers killing Jewish residents.
http://www.bigmeathammer.com/aushwitz13.htm


Illichivsk

A port city in the Odessa Oblast
http://www.jokisaari.net/odessa/odessainfo.html


Ivano-Frankivsk (G)  (Stanisle, Stanislawow) (Galicia)

Located in the Ivan-Frankivska Oblast. It was a large city of more than 100,000 residents, including a thriving Jewish community of 25 to 30,000 Jews. It is located about 85 miles south of L'vov, and is a city of about 200,000.  It was named after the famous Ukrainian poet Ivan Franko.  It is the major gateway to the Carpathian Mountains. This Oblast was once called Stanislaviv (Stanislau in the 1930s). 
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/


Cemetery List

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stanislawow-cemetery/
  

Map of Cemetery
There is more material available at this site including ARIM and Lists of Victims
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/ivano-frankovsk.html

Census

A census of all inhabitants was taken in August 1939.  The original is in the Ivano Frankivsk oblast archives, but a microfilmed copy is available at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum Archives.  It is about 40,000 pages and organized by street.  The finding air will tell you which roll of microfilm has which streets.  Routes to Roots Foundation reports that there were several 19th century censuses of Stanislawow that are in the Ivano Frankivsk Archives.

Holocaust
Susannah Juni created a web page for the Hebrew tables of contents and Martin Kessel constructed an easy to read format for the List of Victims culled from the Russian Commission which investigated war crimes.


  Maps

Ivano-Frankivsk City Maps Page
http://www.lemko.org/maps/cities/index.html

Photos
P
hoto gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry' 
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/stanislawow/

www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/stanislawow/res_sum.html

Travel and Tourism
http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/ukraine.htm

Travel Diary
http://brama.com/travel/clark/2ivano.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/stanislawow-arim/stanislawow-arim.html

"Arim ve-Imahot be-Yisrael" - "Pinkas Hakehillot"
(Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities - Poland Volume II Eastern Galicia, Yad Vashem Martyr's and Heroes' Remembrance Authority)

"List of Victims" (List of Citizens Murdered by the Nazis from the Documents of the Russian Commission to Investigate Nazi Crimes)

Cemetery List
List of inscriptions and map of Ivano-Frankivsk cemetery
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html


Izluchistoye (Stalinskoye, Stalindorf)

There were close to 1,700 Jewish souls living here before WW II.  Most probably a Jewish agricultural settlement, as there were several in the Zaporozhe and Crimea regions of southern Ukraine.
http://www.maplandia.com/ukraine/dnipropetrovska/izluchistoye/


Izmail

An Izmail web site is located at
http://www.chabad.org/centers/default_cdo/aid/249597/jewish/Jewish-Community-of-Izmail.htm 

http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Izmail

http://www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/UK-arch-Ch1Gitelman.pdf


Izrailovka

  

Located 530 km to the west of Ekaterinoslav

http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/demo/GEO_town.asp?id=233

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/colonies_of_ukraine/israelovka.htm


Izyaslav  (Iziaslav)

Located in the Khmel'nyts'ka Oblast.

Photos
A photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html


Izyum

http://www.jewnet.ru/eng/orgs/?id=1481

Holocaust

http://www1.yadvashem.org/yv/en/about/institute/killing_sites_catalog_details
_full.asp?region=Kharkov


Jagielnica (G)

Formerly in Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_jagielnica.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Justingrad - (see Sokolovka)

http://library.pdx.edu/justingrad.html


Kalinovka

ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kalinovka/

Yizkor Book
A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Kalinovka) has updated material available
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Kal'nycja (Kalnica, Kalnica and Lisko and Kalnica ad Cisna where "ad" is Latin meaning near)


  Maps

Excellent color map in Latin characters
http://lemko.org/maps100/Pages/Pg102.html
 


Kalush (G)  (Kalusz, Kalish, Kalisz, Kalusz Nowy)

South Southeast of L'vov.  It was once part of Austrian-dominated Poland and also Galicia. There is also a "Kalush" near Ivano-Frankivsk
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kalush/

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 


Books  
             

     "My Word Is My Bond: A Memoir"
     Authored by Paul Weinberg is a story of a young man who moves from Kalush to New York
 
   and brings his first cousin to the new country to be his wife.

     http://www.mywordismybond.net/


Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Books
"Sefer Kalish, 1964" is in Yiddish and/or Hebrew. There is also
"
The Kalish Book, 1968" in English


Kalyus (Kalius)

Located in the Khmelnytsky Oblast in the Novaya Ushitsa area.  It is located on the Dniester River

Holocaust
http://hmhos.blogspot.com/2007/11/my-village-kalyus.html


Kamen Kashirskiy (Kamen Kashyrsky)

   Map

http://mrheckman.com/kk/

Yizkor Book
http://www.tisharon.org/Remember/Communities/Kamin.htm

http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=2274


Kamenets - (Kaminetz - Podolsky, Camanes, Kamyanets' Podilskiy, Kamenz, Kamenets-  Podolsk,
                          Podolian Kamenets,  Kamianets 'Podils'kyi)

A relatively large town located in southwestern part of Ukraine. Marilyn and Arnold  Handleman traveled to this area in July,1994. It is a medieval fortress city and is the site of much archeological activity.  There is a real castle there along  with a small Jewish community still in existence.  A fair number of Jews left the city because of Petliura's pogroms in the region and were spared the experience of the Einsatzgruppen that murdered most of the Podolsky Jewish population, along with thousands of transported Hungarian Jews from Budapest during WW II.  There is eye witness testimony about this tragedy in the transcripts from the Eichmann's trial.

The town is built on a high rocky bluff of the Smotrich, a left-hand tributary of the Dniester.  It is on the historical frontier of Ukraine and Bessarabia, opposite the castle of Khotin.  The town has changed hands numerous times in history and has been, among others, under Polish, Russian, Turks, Tartars, Moldavian and Mongol rule.  My mother-in-law, Minnie (Manya) Gross (Gringruz) Smolkin emigrated from Kamenetz to Minneapolis, along with her sisters and brother, Nate Gross and their mother.


Books  
             

     "
The Road from Letichev"
     Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
     http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Archive
The
State Archive of Khmelnytsky Oblast
281900 Kamenets-Podolski,
Khmelnytska, vul. R. Liuksemburg 15a, Ukraine.  

City/State Archive
Plosha Polskiy Rinok Square,
14/16, ( located in the old town of Kamenets)
Kamianets-Podilsky
Khmeinitska oblast 32300 Ukraine

Cemetery
Most tombstones are in fair to good condition, but some sections were vandalized.  There is a Mass killing site where over 10,000 Jews were murdered.  The original site is covered by an apartment block built after WWII and some bones were relocated to a mass grave which is located within the Jewish cemetery

Photos
A photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry'
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
- Contact Judith Sharon
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
Center of the Genealogical Information and Researches History of the Family
252146, 22 Zhmerinskya Str., off 86.
Ukraine Kiev
Fax number is 0442773655
Director: A. Eremenko. 

There has been discussion about the Center, as being a private business operated by at least one employee of the State Archives.  The Archives not only hold records of the city, but also of the surrounding areas.  It is relatively easy to visit the city today.

Fond 226 holds records of the  Podolia State Chamber

Travel and Tourism                                                        Traveling Roots
http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/ukraine.htm


Kamenka (G)


Photo of Jews of Kamenka obtained from Bruce Sadler.  He is trying to identify the people in the photo.  Let him know if you can identify anyone. bsadler2047@att.net

http://www.courierpress.com/news/2009/oct/29/faces-of-the-past/

Cemetery
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=74

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Kamenopol

Yizkor Book
"Khurbn Jaryczow bay Lemberg: Sefer Zikaron le-Keshoshei Jaryczow y-Sevivoteha"
(Destruction of Jaryczow: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Jarczow and Surroundings Ukraine)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Kamionka Bugskay (Kamionka Strumilowa)

Located on the Bug (Buh in Ukrainian) river.  There were 3,850 Jews living in the town until 1939.   5,830 civilians were killed in the Second World War.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/town/kamionka_strumi.htm


Kaniv  (Kanev)


Kanev Mass Grave
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=77&p17_imageid
=1240


Kariukovke

This shtetl was known for its sugar factory owned by the well-known Jewish millionaire and philanthropist, Brodsky. An interesting story by Curt Leviant was printed in the December 2009 issue of San Diego Jewish Journal about his great great great grandfather's experience during the Chanukah season of 1843.


Katerinapol  (Ekaterinapol, Kalniboloto, Novoselki , Katerinopol )


http://www.travelingluck.com//Europe/Ukraine/Ukraine%20(gene

Located in the Kiev province and about 115 miles south of Kiev and was also referred to as Kalniboloto (the Yiddish shtetl name)

Cemetery
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=80&p17_imageid=1313

Holocaust
Video Interview
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S29zQJOJqMA

Landsmanshaftn
Most of the Landsmen left around the same time when the pogroms were threatening to kill everyone in the town. The Landsman formed a society in Brooklyn, NY in 1900 to help the families who settled in America.  The society is still active with 6 members.  It is called the Kalniblader Society

Map
http://www.maphill.com


Katyn

A  village where the Germans, in 1943, discovered in the nearby forest, the graves of 4,250 Polish Army officers who had been captured by the Soviet Army in 1939-40.
http://www.infoukes.com/history/ww2/page-16.html
 

Holocaust
A mass-grave containing the remains of at least several hundred (and possibly thousands) of people has been uncovered in the small western Ukrainian town of Volodymyr-Volynskyi, near the border with Poland. This discovery is hardly surprising since the lands of Ukraine, dubbed by Yale history professor Timothy Snyder as 'bloodlands', are full of mass graves dating back to World War II. These lands endured a Nazi genocide that claimed about seven million lives, and a Soviet genocide and mass murder of several million other peasants, 'class enemies' and political prisoners.
http://www.opendemocracy.net/od-russia/ivan-katchanovski/owning-massacre-ukraines-katyn


Kerch


Mourning the Jewish dead in Kerch

A city in southern Ukraine on Kerch Strait, a shallow waterway connecting the Black Sea with the Sea of Azov and bordered on the west by the Kerch Peninsula.  The city was founded by Greek colonists in the sixth century B.C. and eventually passed to Russia after the first Russo-Turkish War (1768-1774). Population: 168,000.

A Kerch web site
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0012_0_11044.html

Holocaust
I found that my half brother, Aaron, his wife and 12 year old daughter Ida Margulis, were among the many Jews killed by the Nazis when they invaded this town in WW II.


Kharkov (Kharkiv, Harkiv)

The second largest city in Ukraine and the administrative center of the Kharkov Oblast.  It is located in the northeastern part of Ukraine, and is an industrial center.  

We visited and stayed for a few days in 1995.  There is quite a bit to see. The population as of 1989 was 1,611,000.  The total population of the Oblast in 1989 was 3,196,000.  South of Kharkov is the natural gas fields at Shebelinka

Bar Mitzvah in Kharkov
http://www.jewishsf.com/content/2-0-/module/displaystory/story_id/19892/edition_id/405

Kharkov Jewish Community
http://info.jpost.com/1999/Supplements/Charity/kharkov.html

Photos
See also a photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry'
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html

Synagogue
Their is an ongoing attempt to restore the Great Kharkov Synagogue.  An American Jewish Family is helping pay for the work.  During the war, the synagogue was used as a sports stadium by the Germans.

Kharkov Great Synagogue


Interior of the Great Synagogue.  Pictured is Shirley Margulis with the secretary of the shul.

Chief Rabbi is Moshe Moscowitz.  The building was built in 1910 and returned to the Jewish community in 1990 after being used as a sports hall.  My wife and I visited the synagogue and met some of the children attending classes along with the secretary of the synagogue.
http://www.isjm.org/jhr/IInos1-2/ukraine.htm

Travel and Tourism in Kharkov  
                                                                      
 Moskva Hotel built before the revolution of 1917

    http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/ukraine.htm


Khartsyzk 


Kherson - (Herson,  Kerson)

Research
Located in the Khersonska Oblast. A database of record is currently being developed, and further information can be obtained at  
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
 

Photos
See also a photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html


Khersones


Khmelnytsky  (Khmel'nyts'kiy, Khmelnitskiy) (now Proskurov)

Located in Podolia Guberniya - previously known as Proskurow and located in the Khmelnytska Oblast

Photos
See also a photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry'
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html

Research
A database maybe available, but check this site for relevant information. 
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
 


Khodoriv


Khodorov  (Khodorkov)

Located between Kiev and Zhitomir was a prominent Jewish area before WW II


Khorostkov (G) (Chorostkow)

Once a town in Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_chorostkow.htm

History
"History of the Jews in the Bukowina"
("Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina,")
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html 

Yizkor Book
T
he table of contents and some chapters from Sefer Khorostkov have been translated into English and are available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ 

The Table of Contents and Some Chapters from Sefer Chorostkow are available


Khotyn  

   

As of 2008, there are 10 Jews living in this town, one of them being a Jewish French professor. 

Cemetery
There is a Jewish cemetery, situated in a field next to a hen house.  The cemetery was reported as being neglected and overtaken by weeds, with a small gray monument with a slanted front.  It is a monument dedicated to the Jews who died during the 1941 occupation.
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ukraine-Khotyn-Cemetary-Mass-Grave.jpg 


Khristinivka

P1010158
Mass Grave
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=81&p17_
imageid=1334

 


Khyriv


  Map of terrain


http://www.calle.com/
 


Kibliltch

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG - Contact Alfred Feller
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Kiev (Kyiv

               
      Outside of Kiev Synagogue.                             Postcard View of 'The Gate of Kiev'
     Photo taken by Ted Margulis, August, 1994 
                 

Located in the north of the central part of Ukraine, and is the major city and capital.  The city is part of the Kyivska Oblast. The city spreads out on both sides of the Dnieper river, Old Kiev rises along the western bank, a hilly city punctuated by old universities and older churches.  To the east, the new city's decaying Socialist-ear apartment blocks stretch out into the flat expanse of the steppe.  This is the third-largest Russian-speaking city in the world.  Russian is spoken here with a slightly different accent than in Moscow - the hard Russian "g" becomes a soft Ukrainian "h," and there is  a euphonious Ukranian lilt. A database of record has been developed
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
  

Kyiv, a scenic city of close to 3 million people situated on the Dnipro River, is the bustling capital of Ukraine. Ancient Kievan Rus, which reached its greatest period of ascendancy during the 11th and 12th centuries, was a center of trade routes between the Baltic and the Mediterranean. The city of Kyiv and the power of Kievan Rus were destroyed in 1240 by Mongol invaders and the lands of Kievan Rus were divided into principalities located to the west and north: Galicia, Volhynia, Muscovy and later, Poland, Lithuania, and Russia. 

In 1843, the Jews are expelled from Kiev where they had lived for centuries. A new wave of expulsions follows when Jews are no longer allowed to live within 50 Verst (1 Verst = .6629 miles) of the western border, The governor of Kiev province, where 600,000 Jews live, urges the government in 1861 to lift the residence restrictions in order to relieve the congestion in the Pale
http://www.friends-partners.org/partners/beyond-the-pale/english/30.html

Once a powerful force on the European scene, Ukraine's fate in modern times has been decided in far-off capitals. As a result, modern Ukrainian history, for the most part, has been defined by foreign occupation. But after gaining the independence by Ukraine in 1991 it significantly restored it's political and economic weight.
http://www.uazone.net/Ukraine_toc.html

http://www.allkiev.kiev.ua/geogr_e.htm

A 10 foot monument to Sholom Aleichem is located in the downtown section of the city, next to the house in which he lived during the turn of the century.  Plans are to make it a museum. Sholom coined the word "Yehupetz" representing Kiev in his writings. There is a discussion group at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/Kiyev2.txt
 

A memorial to the many who were killed during the "Holodomor" (starving the Russian peasants in 1932) is wedged between the gates of the eleventh century Monastery of the Caves, where a number of mummified saints are entombed, and the Soviet Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, from 1957.

Underneath the memorial is a museum where "The National Book of Memory" in nineteen volumes, stands on lecterns around an inner perimeter; behind the volumes is the main exhibit, consisting of old Ukrainian farming tools and quotations after quotation from Lenin and Trotsky.  On one portion of the wall, a documentary and a docudrama about the famine play in succession.

Archives
Has the former Russian records of the Ukraine area.


Books  
             
     "The
Road from Letichev"
      Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
      http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Holocaust
See also a reference to Babi Yar on this page and on the
Holocaust page.


Maps

Kiev City Maps Page
http://www.lemko.org/maps/cities/index.html

Kiev Guberniya Map
Note that the Kiev Guberniya was broken up into several different Regions when the Soviets took over.
http://www.angelfire.com/or/yizkor/gubmaps.html

Kiev
(044) 228 4718.  More information
http://www.freenet.kiev.ua/ISD/ABOUTUKR/ukroblst.htm
 

Photos
Kiev Photo Gallery
A comprehensive archive of pictures and short stories about some of the sites of Kiev, the Capital of Ukraine
http://www.uazone.net/go/gallery.cgi?gallery=Kyiv&ac=index&what=query&q=Jewish 

Also a photo gallery entitled
'
The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html 

Kiev Pogrom
There was one during the year 1906 and 1919
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/03.html#6

Synagogue
Kiev Brodsky Synagogue
This is the largest in Ukraine's capital city.
http://www.isjm.org/jhr/IInos1-2/ukraine.htm

Kiev Telephone Book


Search for free
http://rit.minsk.by/cgi-bin/mphones.pl

Travel
Guide to Kiev

Including photos
http://www.uazone.net/Caption.html
 

Kiev City Guide
http://www.inyourpocket.com/ukraine/kyiv/en/

Kiev Travel and Tourism
http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/ukraine.htm

Traveling to Kiev and Ukraine  Traveling Roots
General Facts About Ukraine

If you want to know about the country, then this site has a lot to offer and is about Ukraine today if you are interested in traveling there in the future.  Includes tips, money, credit cards, currency exchanges, barbers and beauty shops, tracing Genealogy Roots and more
http://www.uazone.net/Ukraine_General.html
 


Kirovohrad (Kirovograd)

Located in the Kirovohradska Oblast. 

Records
A database of records and further information
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
 


Kishinev (Chisinau)

Located on the Byk river, was heavily damaged in the Russo-Turkish War in 1788.  It was ceded to Russia in 1812.  After WW I, it became part of Romania and in 1940 was passed to the Soviet Union.
http://www.genexchange.com

Kishinev Sick and Benevolent Society of New York
Including a list of members in the 1920s.
http://jctcuzins.org/kishinev/kishnev1.html

Pogrom
An almost complete list of the victims of the 1903 Easter Kishinev Pogrom is available at the Kishinev ShtetLinks page
http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetLinks/kishinev/PogromVictims1903.htm


Kitsman (Kicman)

Located in a region of Ukraine that is known as Bucovina (Bukovyna) It is about 30 km almost directly north of Chernivtsi and a county seat.  A write up about the city is published in the Ukrainian Encyclopedia published by University of Toronto.  The river Dniester separates Bukovina from Galicia Kicman is the Polish transliteration of the spelling of Kitsman in its Cyrillic letters.  In the Polish language 'C' is pronounced 'ts'. "Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina" 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html
 


Klebanov Volost

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/belarus/bel129.html


Klichkovich   (Klichkovichi, Kliczkowice)

The village is known nowadays as Klichkovichi located at 51o09' 24o29'. It is  SW of Kovel and near Turiysk. Village or rather small agriculture colony was known in the interwar Poland as Kliczkowice.

What is probably even less known is that Kliczkowce and near by villages: Milanowicze (Milyanovichi) , Tupaly, Wolka Kowelska, Lubliniec, Hrydki, Czerkasy, Turowicze (Turovichi), Olszanka, Kalinowka, Kliewiec, Rudniki and Kruhel have been all part of centralized village Stare Koszary. Stare Koszary are known as Staryye Koshary, but several of those colonies are not shown on the maps.

Research
Jewish names that can be traced to the local villages/colonies through the

1929 Poland Business Directory
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/bizdir/start.htm

P. KAC (KATZ),
J MILSZTEJN (MILSTEIN)
S. GOLFEDER
M.ZEGARMISTER
Ch. GURWIC (GURWITZ)

The above information was posted by Alexander Sharon


Klyuvintsy

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Kobelyaki

Located in the Poltava oblast and is 186 miles east south east of Kiev.


Koktebel


Kolomyia (G)  (Kolomea {Austrian}, Kolomey, Kolomya, Kolomyja {Polish} )

Note that there are several hundred Jews living in the communities of Stanisiawow  and the Rabbi name is Moshe Leib Kolesnik, a local man, trained by Chabad in Moscow.  He also helps the smaller Jewish communities of Kolomyia and Buczacz. 

Archives

L'viv and Ivano-Frankivsk Archives 
holds numerous civil records from Kolomyya (modern spelling). 


Books  
             

"Emergence of Genocide in Galicia and Resettlement Transports to Belzec
Extermination Camp"


"Extermination of the Jews of Kolomyia and District"


Kolomyia Special Interest Group
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/ukraine.html


Yizkor Book

"Pinchas Kolomey" (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 


Komarno

Located southwest of L'viv.
http://www.mapquest.com/cgi-bin/ia_free?width=500&height=300&level=5&lat=496333&lng=237000


Komsomolsk


Konela

P1010144

Cemetery
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid
=82&p17_imageid=1345


Konotop


Kopivka

A small shtetl, actually a dorf, located near Nimirov, Vinitsa District. Though it was small, one of the Jewish villagers owned two Torahs and held services in his house.


Kopychintsy (G)

Once located in Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/kopychintsy/kopychintsy.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Korets

Located 62 km east of Rovno.

Yizkor Book


Korolowka

"For anyone interested in Korolowka in Ukraine, there is a fascinating article about 38 people who lived in caves during WWII.  The article is in Adventure magazine, a publication of the National Geographic (June/July 2004). The focus is on the Stermers and the Wexlers but others mentioned were from the Blitzer, Katz and Dodyk families

To fit in with the magazine, there is a lot of information about the caves themselves, but the dramatic story of those who lived through those awful days comes through very clearly.  The author interviewed some of the survivors, who described the help they received from a couple of Ukrainians and the ordeals of being discovered on several occasions.  Some of the 38 individuals lost their lives during these attacks by Nazis.  Of the 14,000 Jews who lived in the region, not quite 300 survived.   Some of the cave survivors were actually killed after the war by local UkrainiansFrom a posting by Suzan Wynne
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/0406/excerpt4.html


Korosten


Korostyshev


Books  
             

"Some Archival Sources for Ukrainian- Jewish Genealogy" 
There are about four pages of Jewish Vital Records in the book
http://www.avotaynu.com/
 


Korsyn   (Korsun Shevchenkovskiy, or, in Ukrainian, Korsun Shevchenkivskiy)

Located in Kiev Guberniya

Cemetery
DSC08732
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=85&p17_
imageid=1381


Kortelisy

Holocaust
The Germans burned this village to the ground on September 23, 1942 and killed all of its 2,892 residents - men, women and children.  About 459 Ukrainian villages were completely destroyed with all, or part of, their population murdered.  Ninety seven in Volhynia Guberniya; 32 in Zhitomir; 21 in Chernihiv; 17 in Kiev and elsewhere.
http://www.infoukes.com/history/www2/page-20.html
 


Koshar (Kamin-Kashyrsky)

Today it is known as Kamin-Kashyrsky and is located in the center of the Volynskiy region.  It is mentioned in this web site
http://www.ukar.org/shest01.shtml


Koshevato

Located in the Tarascha district, Kiev region


Kosov (Kosiv) (G)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Kostyantynivka


Kovel   (Kowel, Kowle, Kovla )

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"Pinkas Kowel" (Memorial Book of Kowel) 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html:


Kozeletz

Located near Chernigov


Kozova (Kozowa)

A county seat (Raion) and part of oblast Ternopil in western Ukraine.  It was in Poland until September, 1939 and in the Galician part of Austro-Hungarian Empire from 1772 until 1918.


Krakovets

Located almost exactly on the current Ukraine-Poland border and 40 miles west of L'viv.


Kramators'k

A number of Kramators'k web sites (some in English)


Krasilov (Kresilov)

Medvedovka, Zaslav, Volhynia 


Krasnoarmiysk


Krasnodon


Krasnyi Luch


Krasnyye Okny (Krasi Okny, Okne, Okny (Yiddish)

There were about 2000 Jews in 1939. It is located in Odesskaya at 47-32 29-27, 150 km from Odessa


Kremenets (Krementz)

The city has about 25,000 inhabitants with about 25 Jews. The Coordinator for the Jewish community is Larisa Klyuch. Nearby towns include:
Brody, Pochayev and Yampol.
There are other towns with similar names located in Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Germany, Slovak Republic, Macedonia, Russia, Serbia and in Ukraine.

These web sites contains some general information including Kremenets records, and updates on the progress of the Shtetl Co-Op, along with photos and history relating to Jews
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/


http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/kmain.html 

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/General_information_on_Kremenets/rusandpol.htm
  

Cemetery  
"From Ronald Doctors web site: "Over a rise in the hill is the Jewish cemetery. It is huge. It stretches from near the base of the hill in the valley close to town, all the way up to the top, and this is steep terrain. The brush is more overgrown than I thought it would be. My plan to take a lot of pictures of individual tombstones will not work. It would be a helter -skelter approach, and I don’t wan t to waste time doing that Ken gets a number of good photos of the terrain and of individual Matzevot though. We walk through the cemetery. Alex says he never has seen one this extensive...It ’s starting to get dark, so we head back down the hill to the car . Alex gingerly proceeds down the “ road”.
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~orjgs/win22.PDF

Jan Jagielski, Director of History and Documentation at the Lauder Institute in Warsaw,  has an amazing amount of information in his head as well as in his office, and he is very well organized. He has a book that has photos of tombstones in the Kremenets cemetery, plus other photos of the town. 

Holocaust

On September 9, 1942, armed resistance occurred during the liquidation of the Kremenets ghetto and 193 Soviet POWs were gassed in the Neuengamme camp near Hamburg.

Museum
Associated with the Kremenets Museum is Tamar Senina who is working on identifying old Jewish Kremenets

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
A project is translating the 10,000 pages of microfilmed records which contain about 15,000 records.  The films cover Jewish births, marriage, divorce and death records for the period 1870 to 1907.  Contact Sheree Roth

There are some Aliyah records for people from Kremenets. (Those are records concerning people who emigrated from Kremenets to Israel (then Palestine) mostly in the 1929-1939 period). The Lauder Foundation has records of a handful of Kremenets child survivors (now no longer children, of course) who at one time or another were seeking relatives after the Shoah. For privacy reasons only their surnames are available. There are Kremenets Kahal (Jewish self-government) records for the mid 1700's. They are at the Archives of Ancient Acts in Warsaw.


Kremenchuk

A number of Kremenchuk web sites (some in English)

Photos

Photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html


Krivoluka

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Krivoy Rog

Jewish Community
http://www.fjc.ru/news/archives.asp


Krukenitse (Polish Krukienice, Krukenicja)

Northwest of the Drogobych Oblast, and is 13 miles north northwest of Sambor (Sambir).  In 1939 it had a population over 500.  Today, it is located in the L'viv oblast.


Krym

Located on the Krym peninsula and south of Ukraine.  It is by the Azov and Black Seas. The Administrative Center is Simferopol and it is known as the  Autonomous Republic of Krym   Government offices are at
13, Kirova Ave.
Simferopol, 333005
Phone (0652) 25 1275 Fax: (06522) 6414


Kryvyi Rih - (Krivij Rig, Kryvyy Rih)

A number of Kryvyi Rih web sites (some in English)


Krzemieniec

Yizkor Book
'Memorial Book Of Krzemieniec'
Translation of Pinkas Kremenits; Sefer Zikaron Edited by Abraham Samuel Stein and published in Tel-Aviv in 1954 Includes a history of Jewish settlement in Kremenets; Before WW I and more
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets/kremenets.html
 


Ksaverov (Ksaveriv)

Located near road P94 Narodichi-Malin, 25 miles south of Narodiche near the town of Nedashki


Kukizov

Yizkor Book
"Khurbn Jaryczow bay Lemberg; Sefer Zikaron le-Keshoshei Jaryczow y-Sevivoteha"

(Destruction of Jaryczow Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Jarczow and Surroundings Ukraine)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Kupel

186.5 miles west southwest of Kiev and located in the Khmelnytska oblast


Kursk

A city and an Oblast  and is the administrative center for the area.  It is located in western Ukraine - about 120 miles north of Kharkov. In 1989 it had a population of 424,000 in the city. 

The Kursk Oblast  was established in 1934 and its boundaries are the Orel Oblast on the north, the Voronezh Oblast on the east, the Belgorod Oblast on the south and the Sumy and Bryansk Oblasts on the west.  This area is a very important source for refining sugar from the vast fields of sugar beets.  The largest town are Kursk, Lgov, Oboyan, Fatezh.  The Oblast, in 1989 had a population of 1,339,000.


Kushmir

Located in Podila


Kuty

Once in Galicia and located 32 km (about 20 miles) west southwest of Chernovitz, in the Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast.  Close by to the north is Kosov and Kolomyia is north slightly west of Kuty (about 20 miles)Kuty is located on the Cheremoch river.
http://www.ibiblio.org/yiddish/Places/Kuty/

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
There are a few land records for the town that are located in the L'viv Archives.  They date from 1795 to 1858/  There are also land records for Stara Kuty that are in the Kosov area, and these records are also in the same archives.  In 1931, Kuty had 5,393 residents.  


Kuzmin

Research
There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives


Kyiv (see Kiev)


Labun (Lubin is Yiddish name) (See Yurovshchina)

A small village south of Polonnoye. According to the JewishGen Communities Database, Labun is there former name of the town now called Yurovshchina.  Before WW I, Labun was in the Zaslav district (Uyezd), Volhynia Guberniya. Russian Empire.  Between the World Wars, Labun was in Kamenets-Podolski district, Ukraine SSR. Soviet Union.  Today it is in Khmel'nyts'kyi Oblast, Ukraine.
www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp


Ladyzhinka

Cemetery
P1010154
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=86&p17_
imageid=1404


Ladzkie (Liats'ke, Chervonoye)

Was called Chervonoye during the Soviet-era.


Lanchin

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 


Lanovtse

Once in Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_lanowce.htm


Lanowiec (G) (Lanovtse, Lanowitz, Lanovitsy, Volhynia, Ukraine)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Lavriv (Lawrow)


  Maps

http://www.mapquest.com/ 


Lebedintsy (Lebeda)

Located 30 miles southeast of Zhitomir. A map is available at
http://www.mapquest.com/
 


Letichev District (Podolia) Letichev Uyezd    (147.9 miles WSW of Kiev) 8 Shtetls:

It was the home of the Baal Shem Tov and the cradle of the Hassidic movement. See the book
"
The
Road from Letichev"
for a detailed description of synagogues, details on the Jewish agricultural colony and the 1648 Khmelnytsky massacres, as well as the pogroms of 1882, 1903-7 and 1919-21. there are records also available in the Ukrainian Archives

Towns in Ukraine within the Letichev District:
Derazhnia, Letichev, Medzhibozh, Mikhalpol (Mikhampol, Mikhalovka), Staro Zakrevsky Meidan, Volkovintsy, Zinkov, Butsnevtsy (Butsni), Snitkov (Snitovka)


Books  
             

     These towns are mentioned in
"
The Road from Letichev"
     Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
     http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Liatychiv (Latyczow) (Starostwo)

The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, (obtained from Appendix I of the book) was 652
"The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the
18th Century
"
Authored by M. J. Rosman


Litin  (Podolia)

32 kilometers  west northwest of Vinnitsa and had a pre-WWII Jewish population of 2,487.  Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer states that in 1928 Litin had a population of 8,382. The town was known for sawmilling and metalworking
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podolia_Governorate

This town is mentioned in "The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 

Yizkor Book
(A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Litin) has updated material available
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Lozova


Lubarya

Located in Novogradvolynsky District, Volynsky Region


Lubny  (Lubin, Luben, Lovyn)

Once in Poltava Guberniya.  It is located 113 miles (183 km) ESE of Kyiv. Conflicting information indicates that the town of "Lubin" is not Lubny, but rather may be Yurovshchina.

Research
Referenced by an article entitled
 "Using Landsmanshaft Burial Plots to Discover and Confirm the Location of a Family Shtetl"
Authored by Emily H. Garber and appearing in the Spring 2011 issue of Avotaynu.


Luboml

In October, 1941, this village disappeared from the face of the earth.  Nazi storm troopers occupied the shtetl of more than 4,000 Jews who were systematically massacred and then buried in mass graves.

"Remembering Luboml: Images of a Jewish Community"
An exhibition that showed at the Schatten Gallery, Woodruff Library on the Emory University campus in Atlanta, Ga. Information at (404) 727 6868.

Regional Special Interest Groups
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Lugans'k (Luhansk)

A number of L'viv web sites (some in English)

See also a photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html


Lujeni

Located in the Chernivtsi Oblast in the north Bukovina area and near the Prut river.  In 1941 it had a population of 2,023.


Lukov (Maciejow)

http://www.jtasgal.dabsol.co.uk/MACIEJOW/Index.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Lutsk

Located in the Volynska Oblast.

Yizkor Book
A translation of
"Geven a Shtot Lutsk, Geven un Umgekumen"
(Once There Was a Town Named Lutsk and it was Destroyed) An unpublished memoir
Authored by Joseph Receptor

http://www.jewishgen.org/
 

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


L'viv (L'vov, Lwów, Lemberg, Leopol, Lvov)

Located forty-five miles from the Polish border, it is considered the "cradle of the resurgent and sometimes xenophobic Ukrainian nationalism".  It is a well preserved example of Austro-Hungarian Baroque, a smaller Prague. Once part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and then Poland - between the wars -- it became part of the Soviet Union in 1939.  When WW II began, Ukraine's Jewish population numbered some 1.5 million, with 200,000 in LvovIt is the gem of the Ukrainian and European culture - a real open space museum.  The city was originally established as a fortress town, because of its geographical location and natural resources. It was founded in 1256 by Prince Danylo of Galicia, who named the city after his eldest son Lev. 

The principality of Galicia - located in what is today western Ukraine - was originally ruled by the Romanovych line of princes, direct descendants of the Kievan Rus rulers.  However, it wasn't long before the important trading route began successively changing hands as armies battled over its territory.  Lviv was renamed as often as it was retaken.  Leopolis, Lember, Lwow Lvov, and now Lviv. The longest rulers were the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Poland

There is much to read about this city at
http://www.polynet.lviv.ua/lviv/eng/cerkva_e.htm
 

The city was not founded by the Poles, the Germans, nor the Austrians, but it was founded in the mid-13th century by Prince Danylo Romanovych.  He named the city after his son, Lev. Lev, in Russian, means lion.  The Germans called it Lemberg which means "Lion's City. Jews settled in L'vov soon after it was founded in the mid-13th century.  Galicia became part of the Hapsburg Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1772 and L'vov changed its name to Lember and only the wealthy and educated Jews who adopted the German way of life were allowed to live outside the city's Jewish quarter. There is an article, authored by Dan Fellner in the April 2008 issue of Hadassah Magazine
http://www.hadassah.org/
 

http://www.fellnertravelinfo.com/ukraine/

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/Lvov.html

It is believed, according to Dan Fellner's article, that the early Jews arrived from Byzantium and Asia Mino (Turkey) and neighboring lands. Later (about 100 years later) Jews fled Germany because of the plague and persecutions.  By the end of the 14th century, L'vov had two Jewish settlements.  One was inside the walled city and other outside the gates.  Each had their own synagogues and mikvahs, but shared a cemetery.

When it was known as Lemberg, it had been a center of Jewish life to rival Vilnius and Warsaw.  The oldest synagogue in the Ukraine, destroyed by the Nazis in 1942, was located across from the Golden Rose restaurant.

L'viv suffered relatively little damage during WW II.  The result is an Old Town, anchored by cobblestoned Rynok Square featuring more than 40 buildings in a variety of architectural styles.  It bears a resemblance to Florence, Italy.

The city has a general population of some nine hundred thousand people of which there are about five or six thousand Jews today.  There is a Jewish newspaper which appears in Ukrainian and Yiddish, and is published by Boris Dorfman who also gives tours of Jewish sites in L'viv. Meilech Shoichet, a resident, is involved in the Jewish cemetery restoration. 

Archives
Main
Archives, Administration of Ukraine
The Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine, City of L'viv (TsDIA-L'viv)
Soborna Square 3-a
L'viv, 290000, Ukraine. 
Phone/Fax 011 380 322 72 35 08
(Phone Only: 011 380 322 72 30 63)

The Central State Historical Archive in L'viv
Has some historical Manukiv and Orkhovychi Vital Statistic Records. Drill down through culture, Lemkos and genealogy.  
http://www.infoukes.com/

The L'viv Archives
Does not have Parish Records of towns that were formerly in the Hungarian Ruthenia but they do have former Galicia town records.  The L'viv Historical Archives has virtually nothing for towns that were formerly in the Bukowina area.  Email for Diana Peltc, Director of the L'viv Archives archives@cl.lv.ukrtel.net

L'viv State Archives
Diana Peltc is Deputy Director.
http://www.huri.harvard.edu/abb_grimsted/L-2.html


Books  
             
               

     "In The Sewers of Lvov: A Heroic Story of Survival From the Holocaust"
     Authored by Robert Marshall and published by Scribner - chronicles the plight of 20 Jews
     who survived by hiding for more than a year in the city's sewer system.


"Jews Of Poland -- Five Cities: Bialystok, Lvov, Krakow, Vilna and Warsaw"
A documentary account of the vibrancy of Jewish life in the region before the Holocaust.  It was filmed in 1938-39 and is available in both Yiddish and English.
http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/26155/The-Jews-of-Poland-Five-Cities-Bialystok-Lvov-Krakow-Vilna-and-Warsaw/overview


"List of Lwów Holocaust Victims, Compiled List"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
     


"L'viv Sightseeing Guide"
A nicely organized publication with maps, including separate sections dealing with museums and cemeteries.
ISBN 966 7022 09 9


"Lwów Volume: Part I From The Encyclopedia of the Jewish Diaspora, Jerusalem"
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/thesis.htm


"My Private War
Authored by Jacob Gerstenfeld-Maltie. This book tells the story of the survival of a man from Lvov (Lemberg) during the war. It supplies very interesting insights into life in Lemberg during that time.  May be ordered from Amazon.com 


"Smoke in the Sand: Jews of Lvov in the War Years, 1939-1944"
Authored by Eliah Yones and published by Gefen.  This book details the role of the Judenrat (Jewish Council) which provided work for as many as 5,000 people in the ghetto at one time.


"The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness"
Authored by Simon Wiesenthal and published by Schocken.


'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html 


Cemetery
Lychakivsky Cemetery
Bears witness to the city's unique history.  German, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian inscriptions can be found engraved on the crumbling tombstones and imposing mausoleums that stand amid entangled trees and shrubs
http://www.isjm.org/sitesmonuments/europe/ukraine/lviv/tabid/195/default.aspx

http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/article/lwow/12,cemeteries/11181,old-jewish-cemetery-in-lvov/

Communities in Ukraine
http://www.pikholz.org/Trip/community.htm

Galician Forced Laborers from L'vov
Data on 1,110 workers, from a collection of the L'viv State Archives. Holocaust

Ghetto


The Lvov ghetto, shown here in the spring of 1942, was established in late 1941 with 106,000 people. By May of 1942, only 84,000 residents were left. Photo credit: Meczenstwo Walka, Zaglada Zydów Polsce 1939-1945. Poland. No. 107.

Little remains, but there is a pink building at 3 Ugolna Street which is the site of a mid-19th century synagogue, yeshiva and mikve.  It was the city's only functioning synagogue between 1945 and 1962 when it was closed by the Soviets.  A memorial to the victims of the ghetto is at Chornovola Street, near the railroad bridge.
http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005171

http://www.deathcamps.org/occupation/lvov%20ghetto.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemberg_Ghetto

http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/ghettos/lvov.html

Hassidic Movement
L'vov became the center of the Hasidic movement towards the end of the 18th century.

Holocaust
When WW II began, the Jewish population swelled to more than 200,000 as refugees poured in from German occupied Poland. The Germans captured the city in June 1941and more than 6,000 Jews were killed immediately in pogroms carried out by the local population, fueled by rumors that Jews had participated in the execution of Ukrainian political prisoners. In November 1941, there was a Jewish ghetto which eventually held more than 100,000.  Shortly thereafter, the Germans began emptying the ghetto and sending the Jewish population to Belzec death camp (60 miles north of L'vov) and thousands more to the Janówska labor camp (located in the northern part of the city) where most were shot by firing squads.  The Ghetto was liquidated in June 1943.  When the Russians recaptured L'vov in July 1944, there were only a few hundred Jews remaining to tell the story. After WW II, some 30,000 Jews returned, but that number has been since reduced to about 6,000 as many chose to emigrate to Israel, Germany and America.

There remains the ruins of the main Synagogue and Golden Rose Synagogue, the Pas house, Hasidic school and Synagogue, former hospital founded by Dr. Rappaport, Yad Harusym building, hose of Sholom Aleichem, monument of the victims of the Jewish Ghetto, Yaniv cemetery and Yaniv concentration camp.

Andrei Sheptytsky was the head of the Greek Catholic Church until his death in 1944.  This bearded grandfatherly man was most famous for how he opposed SS leader Heinrich Himmler during WW II, by writing him a hostile letter condemning the Nazi persecution of Jews in Ukraine.  Only by divine intervention, say many Ukrainians, did Sheptytsky go unpunished, and the Jews hidden in his monasteries - including the Rabbi of Lviv - went undiscovered
http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005171

Jewish Community Center
Housed in the Hesed Arieh (Lvov Jewish House);
30 Kotlarevski Street;
Phone 011 380 322 389 860; Website is in Russian
There is also a one-room museum in the building.  The facility is directed by Ada Dianova

arie@hesed.lviv.ua
www.hesed.lviv.ua   

L'viv Information
http://www.brama.com/


  Maps

L'viv City Maps
http://www.lemko.org/maps/cities/index.html

http://fcit.sf.edu/HOLOCAUST/gallery/p107.htm

L'vivska Oblast
Located deep in the Carpathian (Karpaty) mountains.
http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Ukraine/Lvivska_Oblast/TravelGuide-
Lvivska_Oblast.html
 

http://www.newportnewslib.org:8080/lib/item;jsessionid=0C6AF4B4B18254F9EE
4EFD8457CF7675?id=229002

Museums
Museum of the History of Religions
Located at 1 Muzeina Street, displays about 50 Judaica items.  Thousands more that are not displayed and may never be, are stored in other L'vov museums.

Photo Gallery
http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetLinks/lviv/links.html


Pogroms
One occurred in 1918 leaving 70 Jews dead.

    
Rynok Square - Photo by Dan Fellner.  See his web page for additional photos and his travel story
http://www.fellnertravelinfo.com/ukraine/


Research
Located in the L'vivska, there is a database on-line at and then follow the links. 
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/

The Lwów Archives indicated that they have records for 1829, 1831-50 and 1896.

L'viv Election list stored at Yad Vashem 
There are twenty-three paper folders in a file called M52.  Everything is in Russian. The folders are in three boxes and these boxes contain twenty-six folders from a
posting by Israel Pickholtz
Zach4v6@actcom.co.il 

L'viv Ghetto Database
An index of the Jews in the L'viv ghetto during the years of 1942-45 on-line at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/lvov.htm
 

ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lviv/Lviv.html

Synagogues
The only active synagogue in the 21st century
Bais Aron V'Yisroel 
4 Brothers Miknovski Street;
380 322 383 804.
Completed in 1931, the L'viv synagogue is in rather good condition though the original artwork on the walls and ceilings need work.

Golden Rose Synagogue
Built in 1582 inside the city walls by the Nachmanovich family and at one time, there was a fight about who own the land that the synagogue was built on with the Jesuits, but the Jews were able to prove that they owned the land.  The synagogue remained right up until the Holocaust when the Nazis burned it down in 1942.  Part of the northern wall has survived and bears a plaque written in English, Hebrew and Ukrainian.  Remains of the synagogue are located at 54 Starojevrejskaja Street.  Next door is the local bureau of the Union of Councils for Jews in the Former Soviet Union which offers a small kosher canteen which can provide kosher meals to visitors.  Contact to make arrangements 380 322 622 219; meylach@link.lviv.ua

A Reform temple was opened in 1910 when the Jewish population was 57,000. L'vov eventually returned to Poland between the world wars and by 1939, it had a Jewish population of 110,000  one third of Lvov's total population.

There were two other prominent synagogues that did not survive the Holocaust.  In the Old Market Square near where the city was founded, there is a plaque marking the location of what was once the largest Reform synagogue in Galicia.  Several blocks away, near an outdoor market at the corner of Sanska and Vesela Streets, in the site of the former Hasidic Grand Synagogue, originally built in the 17th century.

Travel and  Tourism
There is a saying in Lviv that goes like this: "East Meets West"  And it's true.  You can roam the narrow cobblestone streets, gaze in awe at the baroque domes, renaissance steeples and red terra-cotta roofs dotting the horizon.  Such a city cannot be in the Soviet Union.  Lviv' s heart, it is said, always remained in Europe.  It never left the continent that it was a part of for most of its turbulent history.  Missing, if you look over the city from one of the foothills of the Carpathian mountains, are the broad boulevards of Tsarist Russia and the imposing gargantuan architecture of the Soviet regime.  In its place are narrow cobbled lanes winding through a curious mix of classic and romantic architecture.  Lviv evokes images of Prague or Salzburg, which may surprise a few westerners, but is old news for its native residents.

http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/ukraine.htm

Hadassah Magazine of April, 2008 featured a very interesting article by Dan Fellner
http://fellnertravelinfo.com/ukraine/index.shtml

http://www.fellnertravelinfo.com/ukraine/

Union Council for Jews in the Former Soviet Union
www.ucsj.com

White Page Telephone Book


Oleh Iwanusiw, a Ukrainian genealogist,
olehwi@attcanada.net , a member of the
genealogy@infoukes.com discussion group has a 1999 Phone Book and has offered to lookup phone numbers. 

Simon Wiesenthal was living in L'vov with his wife when the Nazis invaded in 1941.  They were imprisoned in Janówska, from which Wiesenthal escaped in 1943 and fought with the partisans before being recaptured in 1944.  Two years after being liberated from the Mauthausen concentration camp, he helped establish the Jewish Documentation Center in Austria.


Lvovo (Lvowo)

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lvovo/

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Lypca (Lipche, Lipka)


Lysyanka

Cemetery
DSC08534
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=89&p17
_imageid=1444


Lysychansk


Lyubar

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG - Contact Ellen Shindelman 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Lyubech


M. Stone Ford

Located in Volyn province, there was a pogrom in July 1919
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/03.html#6


Machifka

Located near Berdichev


Machliniec (Polish spelling for Makhlynets')

A small shtetl that still exists.  To obtain residence records, contact the registry office for Maklynets' located in Stryi.  Vital records are in several places including possibly in Warsaw if your ancestors were Jews or Roman Catholic; if Evangelical, records may be found in Leipzig.


Makiivka

There is a Makiivka web site


Mal'chychi (Malczyce)

Now in Horodok Raion west of L'viv.  Malczyce was in Austria's Grodek Jagiellon Administrative District and Janow Judicial District.


Malin

Located 50 miles south of Narodiche, road P94, and 8 miles south from the main road A225 Korosten-Kyiv


Manukiv (Makuniow)


Maps

A map is available. Information maybe available at the Przemysl Archives. 
http://www.mapquest.com

Research
Vital Statistic Records are on microfilm.  Select culture, then Lemkos and then genealogy.
http://www.infoukes.com


Marganets


Marinopol (Mariajmpole, Maryampol)

Once located  in the Galicia Province of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.  This used to be a small town of close to one thousand residents with about 250 pre WW II Jewish souls.

The town is currently known as Marinopol and between WW I and WW II, it was located in Poland's Stanislawow Province, and again, currently Stanislawow Province has changed it's name to Ivano-Franko(i)vsk.


Mariupol

A number of Mariupol web sites (some in English)


Masandra


Mayuniche


Medvedovka

Volhynia Guberniya


Medzhibozh  (Medzhybizh, Medzibozh)

The shtetl where the Baal Shem Tov is buried.  West of Breslov and also along the Bug River. There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives.  The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book
"The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 18th Century"
Authored by M. J. Rosman amounted to 2,039.


Books  
             

This town is mentioned in "The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Photos
A photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html 


Meidan


Books  
             
     This town is mentioned in
     "
The Road from Letichev"
     Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
     http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Mejirichi

There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives


Melitopol

A Melitopol web site is located at


Melnitsah  (Melnitza, Melnitsas in Yiddish and Melnitsah)

Located in the Tarnopol Oblast.

Yizkor Book
"Melnitza Survivors in Israel and Diaspora"
The Editor is Joshua Liot, and published in Tel Aviv in 1994 and includes illustrations, maps in Hebrew, Yiddish and English.


Mena

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1046450


Mezhyrov

Located near Vinnitsa 


Mezirich

Yizkor Book
"Memorial for Greater Mezirich: In Construction and Destruction"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 


Miaskovka - (Myaskofka)


Mikhalpol (Mikhampol, now called Mikhalovka)


Books  
             

Guide to the Yivo Archives, Volume 0
Available from Google Books, Amazon or Yivo has name lists of Jews from Mikhalpol
 By Yivo Archives


This town is mentioned in
"The
Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/mikhalpol-german-and-ukriane-see-mihhaylovka-also-see-podolia-guberniya.html

History
http://museumoffamilyhistory.blogspot.com/

Holocaust
List of Murdered Jews 
(Yad Vashem holds a list of murdered Jews)
http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameDetails.html?itemId=5752973&language=en

Landsmanshaftn society
http://access.cjh.org/

http://www.felshtin.org/resources/felshtinarchive.pdf


Mikolaiow (Mikolayev, now Nikolayev)

Located in Podolia Guberniya

Daniel Kazez has a link to his Oberman (Guberman)  and Lis (Liss) families from this town
http://www.dankazez.com/guberman-lis.html


Mikulince

Yizkor Book
"Mikulince; Sefer Yizkor"
(Mikulince Yizkor Book: List of Holocaust Victims)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Mikulintsy (Mikulińce) (G)

Once a part of Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_mikulince.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"History of the Jews in the Bukowina," ("Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina,")
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html


Minkovtsy  (Minkovitz)

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/minkovtsy/


Mogilev Podolski - (Mohyliv-Podil's'kyi)

Located in the southwestern Ukraine in the Podolia Guberniya.  It is several hundred miles from Mogilev in Belarus.  This town is located on the Dniester River, just across the river from Moldova (formerly Bessarabia).

Photo
A photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html 

Research
The telephone code is 04337 and the Director's number for the telephone service is 23 444


Molodia (Melodiya)

Located in the Chernivtsi Oblast.  Reports indicate that the Archive is not very cooperative in helping one research and they suggest contacting the nearest Ukrainian Consulate and have them help you fill out a for known as AHKETA (pronounced Anketa), to facilitate the acquisition of information from ZAHS (RAGAS).  The AHKETA needs to be completed in Ukrainian language.

http://www.bukovinasociety.org/gaschler-norbert-molodia-schwabenpfarrei-E.html


 Maps

http://www.bukovinasociety.org/map1910.html

Research
http://wn.com/Category:1940_in_Bulgaria


Mollova Podolia

No information available at this time


Monastyriska (G) (Monastrische, Monastyrka)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
Contact Cynthia Stern
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monastyriska/mon002.html

http://www.ibiblio.org/yiddish/LOC/ds135-r93locbib.html

http://www.jewishinstitute.org.pl/en/gminy/miasto/951.html

ShtetLinks
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Morochne

Located in Rivenska Oblast


Mukacheve  (Mukachevo, Mukacsevo, Munkacs)

Located in Zakarpatskaya Oblast.

Cemetery
The cemetery with the tombstones was eradicated in the mid 1960s, ostensibly for commercial expansion.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary


Maps

City Maps
http://www.lemko.org/maps/cities/index.html

Research
There is an alphabetical listing of 1,500 individuals buried in the destroyed Jewish cemetery.  The list has been previously available in Hebrew and now in English.  The information is from an enumeration list prepared during the end of the 1920s. 

ShteLinks

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mukachevo/ 


Munkacs (Mukacsevo, Mukachevo)

Located in Zakarpats'ka Oblast.

Cemetery
There is an alphabetical listing (in English and in Hebrew) of 1,500 individuals buried in the destroyed Jewish cemetery. Contact: Louis Schonfeld Lmagyar@en.com
 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Muszkatowka (Mushkativka)

Located in the Borszczow District. The Balch Institute located at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's facility at 13th and Locust Street in Philadelphia has information about the immigrant experience. 


 Maps

A map is available at
http://www.mapquest.com/
 


Mychnovets (Michnowec)

A listing of the inhabitants of this village, including the street names is in the possession of Oleh Iwanusiw who can be contacted at olehwi@attcanada.net 


Myklashiv (Myklasziw)

Maps

     http://lemko.org./atlas
 


Mykolaiv (Mikolajow)

Located in the Mykolaivska Oblast. The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book
"The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 18th Century" amounted to 1,142.
Authored by M. J. Rosman

Research
A database of record is developed, and further information can be obtained at  
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
 

A number of Mykolaiv web sites (some in English)


Myrgorod (Myrhorod, Mirgorod)

Photos
See also a photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry' 
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html


 Ndvorna (G) (Nadvirna, Nadvorna, Nadworna)

Once located in Galicia  - Podolia - located in southwest Ukraine, near Poland.

Cemetery
There are 16,000 known burials in this old Jewish cemetery.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Nadvorna/nadw.htm

http://www.isjm.org/jhr/IInos1-2/ukraine.htm

The founder of the Ndvorna dynasty was the Buczacz rebbe ztkll. He was the 5th generation descended to the Baal Shem Tov Ztkll.h according to Chaim Lerman lechaim@telkomsa.net

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG information is available at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Edut ve-Zikaron"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol2_00328.html


Narodichi (Narodiche, Velikiye Narodiche)

Located in the northeast corner of Zhitomir province, 20 miles northeast from Korosten on local road P22.  In Ukrainian this name would be known as Velikiye Narodiche


Nemirov  ( Nemyriv )


Jewish cemetery

Located north of Breslov.

Research
There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives


Nepolokowitz   (Nepolokivtsi (During Romanian times known as Grigore Gika Vode Nepolokautz,
                                  Nepolocauti, Grigore  Ghica Voda)

A village in the district Cozmeni Chernivtsi region, today in Ukraine and before WW II, in north Bukowina, Romania.  It is 30 km northwest from Chernovtsy (Czernowitz)  in northern Bukowina.  It used to be the last train station in Bukowina before crossing the border to Galicia and Poland. In 1776 there were 56 families and by 1900 it had 1,294 inhabitants.  In 1930 there were 316 Jews

Yohanan Loeffler, Melbourne, Australia  is the webmaster
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Nepolakivtsi/

http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2011-07/msg00172.html

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/nepolokivtsi.html

Website
http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/czernowitz12/testfile2010-2/1770.html


Nezhin (Nizhyn) 

The town of Nezhin is located in the Chernigov province of Ukraine. Jews first settled in Nezhin, after the partition of Poland, at the beginning of the nineteenth century. 

Archive
There is an Archive in Nezhin

Photos
Photos, maps and history of the town and area are at
http://www.ourfamilystory.net/chaiken/chaiken_pages/ancestra/ancestral.htm
 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG - Contact Alfred Feller.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Nikopol


Nikolayev (formerly known as Mikolaiow, Nikolajev)

Located in Podolia Guberniya.  Nikolayev is located southwest of Kiev, very near Proskurov. (There are several villages in Ukraine that have the name Mykolaiv)
1800s.html


Nizhnev (G)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG - Contact Susannah R.. Juni
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book


Nizhniye Stanovtsy

Yizkor Book
"
Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html
 


Nova Kahovka (Nova Kakhovka)

Nova Kakhovka (49,500 inhabitants) is the oblast’ town on the left bank of Dnipro. It was founded on the site of Kliuchove Hamlet near the Kakhovka hydroelectric power station in 1950. The water reservoir (2,155sq.km) created in 1955-1958 supplies potable and irrigation water to the southern oblast’s and Crimea. In 1952 Nova Kakhovka became a city boasting good samples of soviet urban architecture of the 1950s: majestic city council, enormous recreation centre with decorated roof and pompous central entrance to the Enerhiya stadium. There are also dwelling houses for engineers and machine hall of Kakhovka HPS

Map of Area
http://www.maplandia.com/ukraine/khersonska/nova-kakhovka/


Nova Praga   (NOV. PRAGA, Nova Praga, Nova Praha, Novaya Praga, НОВ. ПРАГА, Нова Прага)

Вхід до стадіону "НІКА"

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/87184184

Located in Kirovohrads'ka Oblast. The population of Nova Praha, Ukraine is 7513 according to the GeoNames geographical database. 

Map
http://www.gomapper.com/travel/where-is/nova-praha-located.html


Nova Ushitsa (Nova Ushitsa,NOVA USHYTSYA,  НОВА УШИЦЯ  [UKR], NOVAYA USHITSA,  НОВАЯ
                               УШИЦА  [RUS], NEI-USHITZ AND  נײַ־אושיצע [YID], OYSHITZ [YID], USZYCA [POL],
                               LETNEVSKY [RUS, UNTIL 1829], USHITSA, USHITSA NOVAIA, USZYCA NOWA, NOWA
                              USZYCA, NOVA USYCJA, NOVA-OSHITZA
)

Located in the Khmielnitskii (Kamenets-Podolski district until 1954),the Jewish community dates from the early 18th century. In 1765, 203 poll tax payers lived there. From 1838 to 1840, 80 Jews including rabbis and community leaders were tried in what became known as the Oyshits Incident. They were accused by the governor of Kiev, General Gurayev, of murdering two Jews, informers on "absconders" (unregistered persons who had avoided paying taxes and doing military service) to the authorities. Most of the accused were sentenced by a military court to flogging and exiled to Siberia. 1847 census: 725 Jews in town with 1,235 in district. 1897: Jewish population 2,213 (34.5% of the total). After the Bolshevik Revolution and civil war, livelihoods dwindled . 1926: 1,844 Jews (28.4%), and in 1939, 1,547 (55%). In the 1920s a rural Jewish Council (Soviet) existed. Germans entered the town on July 14, 1941. In September a closed ghetto was instituted.  In Spring 1942 Jews from the environs were incarcerated there. On August 20, 1942, an Aktion murdered 3,222. A group, taken to the labor camp in Letichev, perished there. Those remaining in the town ghetto were killed on October 16, 1942. [June 2013]
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/nova-ushitsa-kamenets-podolski-novaya-ushitsa-nei-ushitz-oyshitz-uszyca.html

Maps

Map and Information on Nearby Towns
http://www.geody.com/geospot.php?world=terra&map=col&ufi=-1047930&alc=nvs

http://www.gomapper.com/travel/where-is/nova-praha-located.html

Research
David Goldman davic@pop.erols.com reports that metric records for this shtetl aren't even in the closest large city

Names of Holocaust Victims
http://db.yadvashem.org/names/nameResults.html?placeDeath=Nova%20Ushitsa&placeDeathType=LITERAL&language=en


 Novograd-Volinsk

The city on the river. First mentioned in chronicles Ipatievskoy of 1257 as Zvyagel composed Galitsko-Volyn principality. It also belonged to Lithuania, Poland, Russia. Novohrad-Volynskyi (historical spellings: Возвягель Vozbyahrel’, Звяголь Zvyahol’, Звягель Zvyahel’, Звягаль Zvyahal’; modern: Ukrainian: Новоград-Волинський, translit: Novohrad-Volyns’kyi; Russian: Новоград-Волынский, translit.: Novograd-Volynsky; Yiddish: זוויל translit. Zvil; Polish: Zwiahel) is a city in the Zhytomyr Oblast (province) of northern Ukraine. Serving as the administrative center of the Novohrad-Volynskyi Raion (district), the city itself is also designated as a separate raion within the oblast.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volhynian_Governorate

Jewish Community
http://www.berdichev.org/jews_of_ukraine_1919_1920.html

Metrical Book
There is an 1894 Metrical Book available.


Novgorod-Siverskyi - (Novgorod Seversk, Novgorod-Soversk, Gorky)

A town in Ukraine, about 160 miles northeast of Kiev. It's not far from Chernigov. Novgorod-Seversk, State of Chernigov (now  Gorky). Novgorod-Seversk in tsarist times was part of the Chernigov Guberniya.  The northern part of that tsarist province was moved out of Chernigov province in Soviet times, mostly into Bryansk province, perhaps a bit into Gomel province, but Novgorod-Seversk is within the current borders of Ukraine. Novgorod means "new city" or "new town", and is a common place name

Research
Such records as might have survived from that town should be in the archive in Chernigov, and those records have been filmed and are available from SLC at your local FHC (in Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish)

Novgorod Volynsk Uyezd

There is an 1850 census. Unfortunately this is the only source of information about Novgorod Volynsk Uyezd. No other census or birth records survived.


Novomoskovsk


Novomyrhorod

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/03.html#6


Novoselica

Located east of Cernovcy.

Research
The L'viv Historical Archives has virtually nothing for towns that were formerly in the Bukowina area.


Novovolynsk


Novy Oleksinets

Cemetery
There is an old Jewish Cemetery that Ronald Doctor found on his trip to the area in 2002.
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~orjgs/win22.PDF


Novyy Yarchev (Yarychev)

Yizkor Book
"
Khurbn Jaryczow bay Lemberg; Sefer Zikaron le-Keshoshei Jaryczow y-Sevivoteha"
(Destruction of Jaryczow: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Jarczow and Surroundings Ukraine)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Obertin

Holocaust
http://www.avotaynu.com/holocaust/appendixc2.htm

Yizkor Book
"
A List of Jewish People Who Were Imprisoned and Taken into German Slavery
from Obertin Region"

From documents of the Russian Commission transliterated by Alexander Dunai

http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html


Ochakov


Odessa

 



 


 

 

 

     Odessa Train Station


   
Odessa
 
 
Odessa port

  
  http://www.ukrainian.org/component/datsogallery/detail/1/601
   
A deep water port with access to the Dnepr River.  Many people who claim to have come from Odessa, really meant that they boarded a ship in Odessa, or spent some time in the city before emigrating.

Irving Howe, in his
"World of Our Fathers"
states that the reason that Jews coming from Ukraine and southern Russia did not use this port was that it was rarely practical as it was longer and more expensive.  In 1794, it was created as a Russian city when it was won from the Turks in a war.  It became a major Jewish center, especially for Polish and Galician Jews, once the reforms of Alexander II in 1861 were instituted.    It is estimated that present day Odessa has a Jewish population of somewhere around 25 to 30,000 souls.

In 1820, Odessan Jews founded the first institution of higher education in the Russian Empire, where Jewish students could learn secular subjects such as European

Life for Jews in the city, and surrounding areas, was less harsh and restrictive, than in the rest of Russia.  Jews could be admitted into the city's gymnasia (schools) after demonstrating their educational prowess by passing a written examination.  In 1876, there were three gymnasia and two schools called 'Pre-gymnasia'.
http://www.jokisaari.net/odessa/odessainfo.html

Archives (Odessa) (State)
http://www.mennonitehistory.org/archives/odessa_state_archives.html


Books  
             

"Odessa: Genius and Death in a City of Dreams"
Authored by Charles King and published by Norton. King tells the story of the city's rise and fall through individuals, making his history accessible to the nonscholar.  Given Odessa's cosmopolitan reputation, it's not surprising that wo Western European nobles were among the key figures who developed the city.  The book explores the city's location on the Black Sea that allowed it to serve as a trading port that attracted a diverse population.  It drew Jews to Odessa to work as traders, particularly to their brethren who lived further inland.  Odessa was that rare city in the Russian Empire where Jews and non-Jews mixed, both on the streets and in the city's cultural institutions.


History
Gangster-led crime submersed Odessa which produced the Russian Empire's greatest collection of criminals, delinquents, and creative crooks, men and women who managed to raise the vocation of the lowly gonif to a profession.  The city's relative freedom extended to religion; it became a center of the Haskala, or Jewish Enlightenment.  Spurred by immigrants from the Galician town of Brody, progressive forms of synagogue worship, Jewish choral music and synagogue architecture flourished.

Odessa's diversity didn't survive the 20th century, as it fell prey to the same factors - pogroms, the Russian Civil War and, of course, the Holocaust when it, and the surrounding region, came under the brutal rule of Romanian dictator Marshal Ion Antonescu during WW II.

Many former residents found a "better life" in Brooklyn's Brighton Beach area.  So many, in fact, that it is called "Little Odessa".

Odessa Jewish Pogrom Memorial

Odessa Jewish Pogrom Memorial
http://guideinodessa.com/odessa_tours.html

Holocaust
Odessa Mass Executions from 1937 - 1938.  Lists names in alphabetical order at
http://home.earthlink.net/~hmehrman/execute/index.htm
 

http://archive.jta.org/article/1941/11/14/2855778/massexecution-of-25000-jews-in-odessa-reported-inlondon

Museum of Jewish History

  
 
Partisan catacombs


  Maps

City Maps Page
http://www.lemko.org/maps/cities/index.html

Odessa Opera House  
http://www.jokisaari.net/odessa/galleria/img58.htm

Landsmanshaft
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/AJHS/CatLandsmanshaft.htm

Photos
There is an article in the Eretz magazine (geographic magazine from Israel) issue 73 for Nov/Dec. 2000) which includes a photographic essay on Jewish life in Odessa, past and present. Email: eretz@eretz.co.il
 
http://www.eretz.com/NEW/index23.php

Pogrom
There was a pogrom in 1905.

Research
Baltimore Jewish Community

Rescue, relief and renewal of the Jewish community in Odessa
http://www.associated.org/


A database of records.
Further information can be obtained at  
http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/
 

A database which offers some statistics about Odessa's Jewish traders and journeymen
http://jewish-history.com/Occident/volume2/nov1844/odessa.html
 

Occident and American Jewish Advocate
Industry of the Jews at Odessa in 1842/1844
http://jewish-history.com/Occident/volume2/nov1844/odessa.html

Odessa Mass Executions 1931 - 1938
An alphabetical list of names though admittedly, not complete
http://home.earthlink.net/~hmehrman/execute/index.htm

Odessa Study Group  
Some information can be found here. The site is informative and includes a map link.  Contact is Anita Citron who can be reached from the site.
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ukrodess/page12.html

Odessa Young Men's Benevolent Association
Records from 1950s to 1968, incorporated 1901; Burial Permits 1958-1968.  Records are at the Center for Jewish History, New York City, NY
http://www.cjh.org/

Odessa Young Men of Harlem Sick Benevolence Association
Records from 1898 p 1974-5 in box, est. 1912
http://www.ajcarchives.org/AJC_DATA/Files/1912_1913_7_Directories.pdf

'The Rebirth of the Jewish Community of Odessa'
A lecture  given at a Jewish Culture Workshop as stated in a 284 page book by Igal Kotller.  The program is setup in German and includes several familiar names including Alexander Beiderman
http://uni-potsdam.de/u/mmz/odessa99.htm
 

Vital Records from Odessa and Simferopol
http://www.rootsweb.com/~ukrodess/index.html

Regional Special Interest Group
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/odessa/

Synagogue
This site provides information about the Brody synagogue and also about the Nahlas Eliezer Synagogue, the Central Synagogue and the Kosher Meat and Slaughters Synagogue.  The site includes illustrations of each synagogue described and also and also of the personages associated with each one.
http://www.moria.farlep.net/vjodessa/en/synagogs.html
 

Tikva Children's Home
Although this site doesn't offer any genealogical value, please take a look.  This website provides information about Tikva Children's Home, a non-profit organization whose core mission is to care for the homeless, abandoned and abused Jewish children of the Odessa region of Ukraine. Tikva provides a loving home, essential social services, a first-rate education in the environs of a revitalized Jewish community, and an opportunity for a brighter future through immigration to Israel.

The site is managed by Tikva' s New York fundraising and PR office and includes photos and bios of the children it saves, information about programs in Ukraine and Israel, announcements of upcoming field visits to Odessa, and myriad opportunities for individuals, companies and organizations to help this worthy cause
http://www.tikvaodessa.org/

Travel   Traveling Roots
Odessa Travel and Tourism
http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/ukraine.htm

Founded in 2001.  The full time researcher, and guide is Vladimir Chaplin a 26 year old researcher and guide.
http://www.visit2odessa.com/museums.html#page-the-jewish-museum

UKR-Odessa-Genealogy Research Group 
Formerly known as the Odessa Study Group on JewishGen is now located on the Roots Web site.  To join this group go to
http://lists.rootsweb.com/index/intl/UKR/UKR-ODESSA-GEN.html


http://www.rootsweb.com/~ukrodess/index.html


Okhtyrka


Okup

Baal Shem Tov
Israel Ben Eliezer was born on Chai (18th) Elul 5458 (1698) in this small village in Western Ukraine.  This site is devoted to spreading the teachings of the Baal Shem Tov through stories, music and art
http://www.baalshemtov.com/


Books  
             

 

This town (Okupy)  is mentioned in
"
The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Olesina (Olesino, Olesyn, Olesin)

The name during the Soviet period.  Today it is Olesyn; in Polish it is Olesin and this was the spelling during the Austrian period.  It is about 6 miles northeast of Kozova and Kosova is about 10 miles East of Berezhany. Kosova in Ukrainian (transliterated); Kosowa in Polish and Austrian name. It is a village and about 5 km (3 miles) north of Kozova and is a county seat (Raions).  It was part of oblast Ternopil in western Ukraine and was part of Poland until September 1939 and in Galicia, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, from 1772-1918.


Olexandria


Olgopol

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1049259


Olyka

"Pinkas ha-Kehila Olyka; Sefer Yizkor" (Memorial Book of the Community of Olyka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Orkhovychi -  (Orchowice)


Maps

A map is available and information maybe available at the Przemysl Archives. 
http://www.mapquest.com

Research
Vital Statistic Records

Available on microfilm. For further information - select culture, then Lemkos and then genealogy.
http://www.infoukes.com
 


Osroh

The Great Synagogue in Osroh, Volhynia, Ukraine, Photo 2011 by Vladimir Levin
http://cja.huji.ac.il/Activities/Updates.html 


Oster

Located in Chernigovskaya Guberniya.  There are other towns with this, or a similar name:  Oster 5057 3053 N Ukraine  39.1 miles NNE of Kiev;   Ostjor (OSTER) 5057 3053 V Ukraine  39.1 miles NNE of Kiev; Ostra (VISTRYA) 4855 2508 V Ukraine  262.3 miles WSW of Kiev; Ostra 4819 2539 N Ukraine  263.0 miles WSW of Kiev;  Ostre;  4843 2431 N Ukraine  293.5 miles WSW of Kiev


Ostrog  (Ostroh, Ostrah)


http://www.geni.com/projects/Brody-is-no-more/2250

Located originally in Volhynia Guberniya, but today it is in Rovno (Rivne) Oblast.  It is south east of RovnoBrody is to the south west as is KremenetsNovograd Volynsky is to the northeast. There has been a Jewish Presence: since 15th century. Under the Cossack uprising in 1648-49, 7,000 Jews were massacred. At one time, it was part of Galicia.

 Pre-Holocaust Jewish population: approximately 10,500 Fate of Jews during WW II: murdered outside town by Nazis and Ukrainian collaborators Post-war: the community was not rebuilt after the war.
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Ostroh/


  Maps

Map and additional information at
http://uamaps.com/ukraine-map/rovenskaya/g_ostrog/ostrog/

Research
There some census reports and a number of secondary sources in Zhitomir and Rovno Archives. 

Synagogue
http://members.tripod.com/~mikerosenzweig/polsynagog.htm

 
http://members.core.com/~mikerose/polsynagog.htm

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Ostrog (Vohlin)
Matsevet Zikaron Le-Kehila Kedosha Ostrog book; A Memorial to the Ostrog Holy Community published by The Ostrog Society in Israel in 1987.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/volyn2/Vol015.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Ostropol (Osterpolye)

Located in the Khmelnytsky Oblast -' 4948 2734, Ukraine, 137.7 miles WSW of Kiev.  The hero of Jewish folklore, Gershele Ostropoler was from this town

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
- Contact Martin Horwitz
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Ottynia (G)

Formerly in Galicia. Jews are known to have lived in Ottynia since 1635
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ottynia/ottynia.htm

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Ozernyany (G) (Jezierzany)  

Once a part of Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_jezierzany.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"History of the Jews in the Bukowina" ("Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina,")
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html

"Sefer Ozieran ve-ha-Seviva" (Memorial Book Jezierzany and Surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Ozirna ( Austrian = Jezierna)

A town about 10 miles west and slightly north of Ternopol.  It is in the Zvoriv Guberniya and is about half way to Zvoriv (Zborow)  Before the war it had a population of 6,500 with about 850 Jews.


Maps

http://www.mapquest.com 

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Jezierna"
(Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Palashevka (G)

Once a part of Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Palashevka/palashevka.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Paripsy

Located southeast of Zhitomir and during the late 1800s in the Volhynia Guberniya.


Patskano'va

Located in Zakarpatia. 

Research
For record searching, you need to contact the  Uzhhorod Archives and the respective registries.


Pavlograd


Pavoloch  (Pavolitch, Pawolotsch, Pawolocz)

Located near Kiev

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/pavoloch/pavoloch.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Peremyshlany (Peremyshlyany, Peremyshl' in Ukraine)


Peresyp

A large industrial district on the outskirts of Odessa that built its first synagogue in the early 1890s, from donations from local residents, notable among them Lazar Klebman, a merchant. The synagogue was named Nahlas Eliezer.  More information about this and other area synagogues can be found at
http://www.moria.farlep.net/vjodessa/en/synagogs.html
 


Pereyaslav-Borispol  (Pereyaslav )

Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi (Ukrainian: Переяслав-Хмельницький, translit Pereyaslav-Khmel′nyts′kyi; also referred to as Pereyaslav-Khmelnytskyy) is an ancient city in the Kiev Oblast (province) of central Ukraine, located on the confluence of Alta and Trubizh rivers some 95 km (59.03 mi) south of Kiev. Until 1943, the city was known as Pereyaslav. It is a village in the district of Pereyaslav, government of Poltawa. Its population of 10,000 embraces about 1,000 Jews. Of the latter, 157 are artisans. Instruction in the Talmud Torah is imparted to 114 Jewish children, the remainder attending five elementary schools. From 1648 to 1649 many Jewish families were killed in Borispol by the Cossacks under Chmielnicki
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/3574-borispol

Cemetery
PEREIASLAV-KHMELNYTSKYI MUNICIPAL CEMETERY (JEWISH SECTION - ALTITSKY CEMETERY)
http://www.admin.lo-tishkach.org/Search/Search/ShowQryCemeteryTownPage.aspx?QryCemeteryAndTown=9369

Research
Parish records which are in the Orthodox Consistory of Pereyaslav-Borispol have been filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah for their FHL Catalog. There are 267 rolls of microfilms available to rent. Included are memoranda, decrees and directives, parish censuses, financial records, litigation papers, land and building records, school documents, criminal records, marriage injunctions, disciplinary actions, reports, complaints, vital records and other documents.

The documents refer to localities from all districts of Poltava Province.  Also includes towns from the following districts:
Chernigov Province; Kozeletz and Oster Districts; Kiev Province; Cherkassy, Chigirin, Kanev and Uman Districts: and from Kherson Province; Aleksandriya and Yelizavetgrad Districts. The region was later divided among the Oblasts of Poltava, Chernigov, Kyyiv and Cherkassy, Ukrayina.  Text is in Russian and covers the period from 1733 to 1785 for the Consistory records and 1715 to 1836 for the Parish records

Proceedings of Pereyaslav-Khmelnitskiy city government (Duma) 1870-1917 – Jewish Archive Fund 534
http://www.jewua.info/proceedings-of-pereyaslav-khmelnitskiy-city-government-duma-1870-1917-jewish-archive-fund-534/

http://www.ibrary.illinois.edu/spx/webct/subjectresources/subsourukr/Archival_Resources.html


Pervomaysk (Bogopol, Myk)

Located in the Vinnitsa Province and in the former Russian Podolia Guberniya.   It is 94 km southeast of Uman. The town was created in 1919 after the villages of Olviopol and Holta combined with Bogopol to form Pervomaysk.  Prior to WW I it was in the Russian Podolia Guberniya , and today it is in the Mykolaiv Oblast
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/453340/Pervomaysk

http://www.mkjcc.org/en/community/region/pervomaysk/

Cemetery
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/pervomaysk-bogopol.html


 Maps

http://www.mapquest.com 

http://www.infoukes.com/lists/genealogy/ 


Pereyaslav Khmel'nitskiy (Pereiaslav, Perejaslav)

Southeast of Kiev


Pereyaslav-Khmelnytsky


Petrovka (Krasnogvardeyskoe)

House where the Jews of Petrovka were assembled before being murdered
 

House where the Jews of Petrovka were assembled before being murdered
http://www.yadvashem.org/untoldstories/database/index.asp?cid=309

Until 1925 Petrovka was part of Kurman-Kemelchi, today Krasnogvardeyskoe; afterwards it became an independent village.

History to 1881. Jewish settlement in Ukraine predates the beginnings of recorded history in the region. Archaeological evidence places Jews among Greek traders inhabiting the Black Sea coastline in the early centuries before the Common Era. The eastern portions of Ukraine, extending all the way to Kiev, were later absorbed into the Khazar kingdom, with its center just north of the Caspian Sea. The Khazars were a Turkic nomadic people whose rulers and upper classes converted to Judaism in the mid-eighth century, perhaps in an attempt to retain political independence in the face of the growth of the Christian world in the west and Muslim expansion from the south. Kiev in particular shows significant evidence of Khazar settlement, and the city may in fact have been founded by the Khazars as a trading outpost. The story of the Khazar king’s conversion to Judaism, after he had convened a debate among representatives of the major monotheistic faiths, is later echoed in the Povest’ vremennykh let (Russian Primary Chronicle; twelfth century), describing how Prince Volodymyr (Vladimir) chose Eastern Christianity under similar conditions in the late tenth century
http://www.yivoinstitute.org/downloads/ukraine.pdf

Holocaust
At the end of 1941 or the beginning of 1942 the Jews of Petrovka and of  surrounding
kolkhozes were murdered on the outskirts of the  village. Petrovka was liberated by the Red Army in mid-April 1944

World War II in Ukraine: Jewish Holocaust
http://www.infoukes.com/history/ww2/page-25.html


Piater (Petagora)

A small village in Russia (now Ukraine).

Holocaust
A cemetery in Hartford, Connecticut held a memorial service in 2009
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6eyVGprYqw


Pidhaytsi   (Pidgaitsi, Pidhaitsi, Pidhajci, Pidhajzi, Pidgajci, Pidgay)

http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/pidhajtsi.htm


Pikulovitse

Yizkor Book
"
Khurbn Jaryczow bay Lemberg; Sefer Zikaron le-Keshoshei Jaryczow y-Sevivoteha"
(Destruction of Jaryczow: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Jarczow and Surroundings Ukraine)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Pisarevka

Located 191.3 west southwest of Kiev in the Khmelnytska oblast


Pochayev

Yizkor Book
"Pitshayever Yizkor Bukh"
(Memorial Book Dedicated to the Jews of Pitchayev-Wohlyn executed by the Germans)
http://www.jewishgen.org//yizkor/translations.html
 


Podbortse

Yizkor Book
"Khurbn Jaryczow bay Lemberg; Sefer Zikaron le-Keshoshei Jaryczow y-Sevivoteha"
(Destruction of Jaryczow: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Jarczow and Surroundings Ukraine)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Podhajce - (Podgavtsy)

It was once in Galicia, and now it is known as Podgaytsy, Ukraine.

Cemetery
There was once a Jewish cemetery.
The
New York Podhajcer Society has cemetery records for this shtetl.

Research
Births
and Marriage records
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

Deaths: 1896, 1898, 1899
Deaths (Index Only); 1879-1882, 1884, 1887, 1893-1895

Index Only entries are extracted from indices and the underlying records are not available and cannot be ordered from AGAD.

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Records for 90 districts and sub-district towns in the former Galician provinces of Lwów, Tarnopol and Stanisiawow.  Nearby towns and villages may also have registered their vital records in these district and sub-district towns. 

Travel
Jean and Mervin Rosenbaum visit to Podhajce
http://podhajce.homestead.com/

Podgaytsy Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol2_00410.html


Podkamen (G)   (Podkamien, Podkamin, Podkaminya, Pidkamin, Pidkamien)

Once a part of GaliciaThe name translates to 'Below the Rock'. It is just northwest of Rohatyn. There are actually two towns with the name of Pidkamin in Ukraine.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/podkamen/podkamen.htm

Photos
http://collections.yadvashem.org/photosarchive/en-us/102188.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Podlaski Malyye

 


Map

http://www.getamap.net/maps/ukraine/ternopil_s_ka_oblast/_podvolochisk/

Yizkor Book
"Khurbn Jaryczow bay Lemberg; Sefer Zikaron le-Keshoshei Jaryczow y-Sevivoteha"
(Destruction of Jaryczow: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Jarczow and Surroundings Ukraine)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Podolia

Located in the southwestern Ukraine, northeast of Moldova/Bessarabia and now in Ukraine.  The largest city is Kamenetz-Podolsk.  Podolia Guberniya is next to Volhynia Guberniya.


Maps

A map of the general area is available at:   
http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~feefhs/maps/ruse/re-ukrai.html

www.expediamaps.com/results.asp?Place=uvysla 


Podvolochisk

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Podwoloczyska ve-ha-Sevivah"
(The Book of Podwoloczyska and Environment)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Pogrebishche 

http://www.nachshen.com/lifschitz.htm

http://nachshen.com/gazeteer.htm


Polonnoye   (Polna, Polonnoje, Polona, Polonna, Polonne, Polone)

A wedding in Polonnoye, Ukraine. The bride is standing under the chuppa, the marriage canopy
http://www.friends-partners.org/partners/beyond-the-pale/eng_captions/31-1.html

Located 50° 07'N x 27° 31'E  Poninka and Novalabun, all are located in the Volhynia Guberniya.  It is close to Labun.

Holocaust
The Jews of Polonnoye and Labun were placed together in a ghetto created at a quarry near Polonnoye.  They were then massacred together
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/polonnoye/polonnoye.html

Museum
There is a Peretz Markish Museum opened.  This was the birthplace of this famous Yiddish poet and murdered under Stalin in 1952, along with other Jewish writers in the Soviet Union.  Curator is Semyon Bentsiannv.

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Subscribe to the Polonnoye Discussion group
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/polonnoye/Listserv.html
 

Research
The site has past and present photos, historical summaries; a summary of surnames being research; bibliography; and a list of Landmanschaften cemeteries. 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/polonnoye/index.html
  

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/polonnoye/polonnoye.html
 

"Sefer Zakorrem"
(Book of Memory; Suffering of Jews that died during the Nazi Occupation; History of Polonnoye Jews) 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Poltava, Dniepropetrovsk

A number of Poltava web sites (some in English)


Pomortsy (G) (Jazlowiec)

Once part of Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_jazlowiec.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Popiel

Located near Boryslaw and 4km from Boryslaw-Tustanowice.  From the 1929 Poland Business Directory this village was located in Drohobycz County, Lwów Province in Poland at that time. 

Census
In the 1921 National Poland Census, there were 1,834 people living in this village of which there were 27 - 50 Jews, but only 19 declared their mother language as Jewish.

Research
The Regional Court was in Sambor


Postolivka

Located in the Husiatynskyi Raion, Ternopilska Oblast

Holocaust
There is  a list of probable Jewish surnamed soldiers born in this town who died or disappeared in WW II and published on the Internet: 
Baran, Berchyshyn, Bekhavskyi, Bialkovskyi, Hensiur/Gensiur, Zel, Zubak, Kowalski, Kolisnyk, Konkani, Kravets, Kushil, Malkut, Mushaliuk, Podolskiy, Polnyi, Slobodetskyi, Teshner, Turchyn, Shevela.


Potochany


 Maps

Map of area
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?countryid=247&addtohistory=&country=UA&city=Potochany&submit=Get+Map


Priluki - (Pryluky, Przyluka)
 

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/priluki/priluki.html 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"Kniga Pamiati"
(Memorial Book to the Warriors, Residents of Priluki Who Perished in the Great Fatherland War - WW II
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Probuzhna (G)

Once a part of Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_probuzna.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Proskurov  (Proskurow) (now Khmelnytsky)

Located in Podolia Guberniya. This town is mentioned in
"The
Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 

Cemetery
There is a Mass Grave of victims of the 1919 killings and the cemetery is in excellent condition

History of the town of Proskurov
http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/Podolia/proskurov/ProskurovCollection.htm

Holocaust
http://collections.yadvashem.org/photosarchive/en-us/56385.html

Research
1875 Jewish census
Located at the Kaminetz-Podolsk Archives

Pogrom
http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1P2-3842191.html
 

Synagogue
  
 Proskurov Synagogue


Przemysl

Przemysl was part of the Rzeszow "Kehila", but they parted ways and Przemysl became part of "Kehilat Lember" (L'vov).

Archive in Przemysl (State)
Has it's own web site which indicates that it has among others, Jewish documents.
http://www.workjoy.com.pl/pmap_gos/archiwum/ev/historia.html
   

History of the Area
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Przemysl/history.shtml


Maps

This is an easy to search site that includes a interactive Road Atlas of Ukraine, music and a clickable map of the Eparchy of Przemysl:
http://lemko.org


Zasadki

www.mapquest.com/cgi-bin/ia_free?width=500&height=300&level=5&1at=495167&ling=

Holocaust information
about Przemysl available at Poland


Pukiv

Research
The FHC has microfilmed some records
www.familysearch.com
 


Putyvl'


Rabotishche

Located about 120 miles west of Kiev


Maps

A map is available of the area
http://www.mapquest.com
 


Rachov  (Rakhiv, Rakhov in Ukrainian; Rakhov in Czech and Raho in Hungarian)

Located near the Tisla river )- located in the Zakarpats'ka Oblast and is south of L'viv and north of Sighet, Romania.  In 1941, it had a population of 12,455 and belonged to the Austria-Hungary until 1920, when it passed on to Czechoslovakia.  In 1938, it was given to Hungary and in 1945 the USSR acquired the city.

Yizkor Book
There is a translation of the history and a description taken from "Sefer Marmarosh"
http://home.ici.net/~eganin/www/translations/rachov.html
 


Radensk

Located in the southern region of Ukraine.  It is 17 miles west-northwest of Kherson and 105 miles west of Odessa. It had, in 2004, a population of 3,804
http://www.wolframalpha.com/entities/cities/radensk_ukraine/4y/ci/j8


Radomyshl (Radomysl)

The site includes a lot of new discoveries.  It contains eight parts: History; Images; Maps; Links; Holocaust; Archives & databases; Memoirs & Family stories and Genealogy.  The site also (under Archives & Databases) a link to the 1913 List of Radomyshl Businesses and a list of Holocaust victims named by street.
http://radomyshl.lk.net

Images of Radomyshl
This site contains History, Images, Maps, Links, Holocaust Archives and databases, Memoirs and family stories and Genealogy
http://radomyshl.lk.net/imindex.html

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/03.html#6


Regional Special Interest Groups

Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Radovtsy (Rodavetz)

  

This shtetl is located in Podolia region.
http://www.topix.com/ua/khmelnitskiy


http://www.traveljournals.net/explore/ukraine/map/m1561167/radovtsy.html


Radzewillow (Radyvyliv)

Located in Volhynia and is 374 km west of Kiev.


Radzivylov (now known as Chervonoarmiis'ke)

It is about 88 km. southwest of Rivne.

Research
1880 birth and marriage registers.


Rafalovka - (Stararafalivka, Starayarafalovka)

http://home.comcast.net/~carol.deckelbaum/genealogy/rafalovka.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Ramenskoye

Jewish Community
http://www.fjc.ru/news/archives.asp?origMedia=231180&scope=0&start=580&l=en&media=80056


Ratno

Yizkor Book
"Ratne; Sipura Shel Kehila Yehudit she-Hushmedah"
(Ratne; the Story of a Jewish Community that was destroyed). 
The Editor is Nahman Tamir who lives in Tel Aviv and the Ratno Society in Israel, published the book in 1983.  The book has not been translated into English.


Repuchewitz (Repuzynce, Repuzhintsy)

It is corrupted German/Yiddish version of village Repuzynce, pronounced [reh poo zhee ntseh] (currently known in Ukrainian as Repuzhintsy at 4839 2548) located just 3 miles East from Zalishchyky.

Both localities are located within the historical Bukovina where Ukrainian, Romanian (Moldavian), Russian, German (Austrian) and Yiddish town names are happily mixed up.


 Rovno (Rovno, Ruvno, Ruvne)

Located in the Volhynia Guberniya and is the Rivenska Oblast (Province) capital in the NW area of Ukraine. This site will also offer various maps, history, searchable database and photos.

http://www.binenbaum.org/Cities_Ukraine_Rovno.shtml


Maps

http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/ 

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ukrwgw/oblastclickmap.html

Along with the city of Rivne, both Lutsk and Zhitomir are also capital cities of their respective oblasts and all three oblasts form a region known as Volyn', or Volhynia.  This is a plateau, in the forest zone of Ukraine, bordering with the Polissia region (Pripet marshes, lowlands that spread into Belarus).  On the west is the Pidliasshia region of Poland, on the South Galitzia and Podolia regions of Ukraine, and on the east --- Central Ukraine Kyiv region.

Research
A database will be available in the future.

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/rovno/rovno.html


Rogachev

Located between Berdichev and Novograd Volynskiy.


Rogatin (G) (Rohatyn)

Once part of Galicia, Rohatyn (Ukrainian: Рогатин, in Polish): a city located on the Hnyla Lypa River in the Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast, in western Ukraine

www.rtrfoundation.org/webart/archdatap46-49.pdf 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
"Father Patrick Desbois and his organization in Paris, YAHAD In Unum, hundreds if not thousands of previously unknown and/or undocumented mass graves sites have been - and continue to be - documented across Eastern Europe, Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, and Russia. These are in many cases previously unaccounted for and uncounted dead in the statistics of Shoah deaths. Through ballistic experts, historic aerial and ground maps, Soviet Extraordinary Commission reports from 1944-46, yizkor books, and other written sources, as well as eyewitness accounts (many of which have never been told before), the work of Father Desbois and YAHAD provides an important missing piece of the Shoah: the Nazi campaign of extermination by bullets.


"The Holocaust By Bullets."
Father Desbois authored in 2007, "La Shoah Par Balles", subsequently translated into English "The Holocaust By Bullets."
The release of his book coincided with the release of Daniel Mendelsohn's remarkable book, "
The Lost" (translated into French as Les Disparus).
 

Located today in Ukraine, about one hour's drive south and east of the city of Lviv. Rohatyn is located near Mendelsohn's family shtetl and both are located in the heart of Father Desbois' investigations.

A few of these elderly Ukrainian (non-Jewish) witnesses had seen and/or heard the murder of the  Rohatyn Jewish community between 1942 and 1944. As is typical,
until their interviews by Father Patrick Desbois, these witnesses had never before told anyone about what they saw - and, in some cases, how they or their parents had participated in the Jews' destruction. From Ukrainian oral testimony to oral French translation, I had the opportunity to access these videos and tapes and make English transcriptions for sharing with the members of my Rohatyn Google research group.

On March 30, 2011, my husband and I had the privilege to join Father Desbois' group for one day of a Poland-Ukraine study trip that began three days earlier in Krakow. It was the last day of their itinerary, which had included a visit to the Jewish sites of Krakow, Schindler's factory, the nearby camps, as well Rava-Ruska and Belzec. Their final day - now with us in tow - was to include a visit to the Lisinitchi forest on the outskirts of Lviv where Lviv' s Jews and others were murdered by bullets and dumped into mass graves, and sites further east including Busk and Olesko. The day was compellingly summarized in the recent issue of the YAHAD Newsletter (No. 15):

"The tour was led by Father Desbois and historian Marcello Pezzetti, a member of YAHAD' s Scientific Committee and director for the new Shoah Museum that opens in Rome in 2014. For
four days, a 30-member group, from 12 countries, toured concentration and extermination camps, visited museums and walked the sites of mass shootings, in a program designed to shed additional light on the history of the Holocaust in the East. Beginning in Krakow, Poland, participants took a narrated walking tour of the Krakow ghetto and the historic Jewish quarter and visited the Krakow Historical Museum located in the former factory of Oskar Schindler. During the week, the group met with the museum directors at Auschwitz and the Belzec extermination camp, visited execution sites in the Ukraine at Lvov, Busk and Olesko and heard briefings on Nazi programs such as Operation Reinhardt and Operation 1005. The program included a visit to the Ukrainian town of Rawa Ruska, the starting point of YAHAD 's research program and the site of a concentration camp in which, as Father Desbois recounted in his book, "The Holocaust by Bullets", his grandfather had been imprisoned and witnessed the fate of the Jews. In Lvov, the group walked through the Lisinitchi forest, a huge extermination site with 49 mass graves. The program offered participants the opportunity to better understand YAHAD 's research methodology that combines archival research with the testimony provided by witnesses. The group also heard directly from witnesses interviewed by YAHAD. For those interested in reading reports of each of the days' events and speakers, along with photos, here are the direct links to the daily blog written daily for YAHAD by William Mengebier, who was on the trip: 27 March, Krakow:
http://yahadblog.weebly.com/1/post/2011/03/empty-chairs-the-vanished-jews-of-krakow.html

28
 
March: Birkenau and Auschwitz:
http://yahadblog.weebly.com/1/post/2011/03/a-town-called-owicim.html

29
 
March, Rava-Ruska and Belzec:
http://yahadblog.weebly.com/1/post/2011/03/roots-rawa-ruska.html

For the day we joined (30 March), the YAHAD blog relates our experiences far better than we can:
http://yahadblog.weebly.com/1/post/2011/03/fading-memories.html

We posted some additional photos of our own here:
http://www.pbase.com/nuthatch/ua_a_day_with_yahad

And a moving account of the group's last day together and departures for home (to France and many other countries):
http://yahadblog.weebly.com/1/post/2011/04/journeys-end1.html

The direct web link for YAHAD In Unum:
http://www.holocaustbybullets.com/

The link for YAHAD In Unum News is:
http://www.yahadinunum.org/en/about-yahad-in-unum/yahad-in-unum-news-no-15-avril-2011/

The link for the ongoing YAHAD blog is:
http://yahadblog.weebly.com/


Books  
             
 

For information on Father Desbois' book, "The Holocaust By Bullets", see:
http://www.holocaustbybullets.com/en/about-patrick-desbois/publications-2/

Finally, I wish to add that Father Desbois and YAHAD are seeking to get in contact with anyone who is a survivor of Busk or who can
point them to a survivor or eye witness of the atrocities perpetrated there; these horrors remain largely undocumented and still unacknowledged. To email YAHAD, contact Marina Durteste at
m.durteste@yahadinunum.org
 (French or Ukrainian language) or Marco Gonzalez (English, French, or Spanish language) at m.gonzalez@yahadinunum.org From a posting by Marla Raucher Osborn


ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rohatyn/rohatyn.htm

Yizkor Book
"
Database of names from Rohatyn Yizkor Book and Rohatyn Cemetery Database"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 

Another one was printed in Israel in 1962 titled Kehelat Rohatyn.


Rokitnoye

Yizkor Book
"History of the Jews in the Bukowina"
("Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina,")
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html


Romanovka (G)

 Once a part of Galicia
 http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_romanowka.htm  

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Romanowe Siolo

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Romny


Rostovitsa (Raschtevitza)

A railroad station located approximately 7 miles northeast of Belilovka on a rail line that connects the town of Uman to the town of Kazatin


Rotmistrovsky

Pogrom
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/03.html#6Rovenky 


Rovno  (Rowne) - (Rivne, Rovne, Rowne, Rowno, Ruvne, Ruvno)

Rivne is also an Oblast

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rovno/rovno_homepage.htm

Archive
Rivne Oblast Archive
http://www.huri.harvard.edu/abb_grimsted/O-17.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"Sefer  Zikaron" (Rowno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Rowno, Wolyn)
http://wwwjewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 


Rozdol (G)  (Razdol, Rozdul, Rosdil, Rozdo, Rozla)

A very informative (East Galicia) web site:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rozdol/rozdol.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Rozhniatyn

Located between L'viv and Ivano-Frankivsk and is a 'county' seat.


Rozhnyatov (G) (Rozhnyatov)- (Rozhnyatov, Rozniatow, Rozhantov, Rozhnyatuv, Rozintov, Roznatov,
                                   Roznyatuv
)


http://members.shaw.ca/d_y_g/5johann.htm

http://otherimages.net/resultsframe.asp?inline=true&image=0400023452&wwwflag=3&imagepos=14 

Once a part of Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Rozhnyatov/Rozhome.html

Cemetery
Four hundred photos of gravestones can be viewed at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Buchach/
Gravestones2000/index.htm

 

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Rozhnyatov/Gravestones2000/
index.htm
 

Rozhnyatov Aerial Photo of Jewish cemetery
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Rozhnyatov/RozhCemetery.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 

The Rozhnyatov Yizkor Book is available at
http://www.ushmm.org/research/library/family/books/#R


http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Rozniatow/Rozhnyatov.html


Rozniatow

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Zikaron le-Kehillot Rozniatow" (Yizkor Book in Memory of Rozniatow)  which includes the neighboring communities of Stryj, Dolina, Bolkhov, Kalush and Stanislawow.  The Table of Contents indicates that there is a map of Rozniatow and photos
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Rozniatow/Rozhnyatov.html

http://www.library.yale.edu/judaica/site/collection/yizkorbooks.php


Rozvoriany


 Maps

http://www.mapquest.com/cgibin/ia_free?width=500&height=300&
level=5&lat=498167&lng=245167


Rozyszcze

Yizkor Book
"
Rozyszcze Ayarti" (Rozyszcze, My Old Home)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Rubizhne


Ryzhanovka (Ryshanovka, Roshanovka)

Located 149 km south of Kiev in the Kiev Guberniya.


Sadgura (Sadagera in Yiddish)

A suburb of Chernivtsi.  At one time the population was about 80% Jewish. 

Memoirs on the Sadgura ShtetLinks web site recalling life in Sadgura (Bukovina) and Chotin (Ukraine) in the early 1900s.  Jack (Yankel) Becker tells the story of his early years in this 1974 oral history - interview with his daughter, Elizabeth  
becker.html

Links to additional information including photos, maps, databases, personal trips, about the area. Rabbi Israel Friedmann was the patriarch of the Ruzhiner, later Sadagorer, dynasty of Hasidic Rabbis.  He moved to Sadagora, Austria (now Sadgura, Ukraine) in the mid 1800s. 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/sadgura/sadgura.html


Historical account
:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sadgura.html


and the scholarly work by Dr. Assaf of Tel Aviv
http://spinoza.tau.ac.il/hci/vip/David-assaf.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina" (History of the Jews in the Bukowina)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Sadowej-Wiszni   (Sadowa Wisznia, Sudova Vysnya, Sudovaya Vishnya, Vinizka)

Located in present day Ukraine and is 28.4 miles west of L'viv and 26 miles east of Przemysl - just over the Polish Border.


Sambor (Sambir)

This is a 15th century community which had about 8,000 Jews before the WW II.  Most were deported to Belzec
http://motic.wiesenthal.com/
 

Holocaust
Between the "Aktionen" and deportations to Belzec, they wiped out the community. 


  Maps

Map of Sambor
http://motlc.learningcenter.wiesenthal.org/pages/t068/t06828.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
for Sambor, Galicia (now Sambor, Ukraine) are available at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw and will be indexed by JRI-Poland. 
Births: 1862-1883, 1885-1897; 
Marriages: 1877-1897; 
Deaths:  1868-1883, 1887-1894

Another informational site for Sambor is
http://motic.wiesenthal.com/albums/malbum/m15/a0770m2.html
 

Some additional information may be available at my web page for Galicia

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


http://www2.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sambor/sambor.html


Sarnovichi

Located northeast from Korosten and halfway to Narodiche 


Satanov (G) (Sataniv, Satanow)

Once a part of Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Satanov/satanov.html


Books  
             

This town is mentioned in
"The
Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock  
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book
"The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the
18th Century"
Authored by M. J. Rosman amounted to 1,625.


Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Seletin

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
Contact Norah Schdrf
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Seredne (Hungarian Szerednye)

Once was in Carpatho-Russia, Czechoslovakia, today in Sumy District Ukraine. Jews settled here in the early 19th century and numbered a few hundred until the end of the century. Russian soldiers killed 25 Jews on March 19, 1918.  In 1926, there were 1,176 Jews and only 463 in 1939 when the Germans captured the town on October 1, 1941.  In December, 1941 the 100 remaining Jews were murdered.
Information obtained from


Books  
             
 

"The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust"
Authored by Shmuel Spector and Geoffrey Wigoder.


Holocaust
In 1941, they murdered over 100 of the remaining Jews.


Sevastopol

A number of Sevastopol web sites (some in English)

Photo
A photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry' 
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html


Severodnetsk

A number of Severodnetsk  web sites (some in English)


Shargorod (G)

A town in Vinnitsa oblast, Ukrainian SSR An organized Jewish community existed there from the latter half of the 17th century. 


Books  
             

"The Shtetl: Image and Reality,"
Edited by Gennady Estraikh and Mikhail Krutikov and published by the University of Oxford in 2000, offers a study by Alla Sokolova, entitled "The Podolian Shtetl as Architectural Phenomenon."  The author describes the general layout of several towns: Shargorod, Tomashpol, Chernivtsi, Yaruga, Bershad and Dzigovka and discusses the architecture and interiors of many of the buildings she visited.  At the back of her chapter she presents a 'schematic plan' of Shargorod. 

She also reproduces a photograph of a frame house in Shargorod, which has a stone basement and walls of mud and thatch cylinders, dating from the second half of the 19th century.  There is also a photograph of another, similar house in Shargorod, but with a different floor plan.  This house dates from the early part of the 19th century but has a facade of brick which was done in the early 1990s as part of its modernizing.  Each photograph is accompanied by a floor plans showing where the various rooms were located.

Encyclopedia Judaica 
http://www.bjeindy.org/encyclopedia_judaica_online


This town is mentioned in
"
The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock 
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Photo
A description of the town's narrow streets and a photograph of a building in color
http://home.comset.net/adainlo/eng-ukrain.htm
 

ShtetLinks
Sites that have additional information includes: 
http://motlc.wiesenthal.com/text/x29/xm2995.html
  

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG - Contact Yackov & Lena Berkun.
http://www.jewishgen.org
 


Shahtarsk

Ukraine - UA , UKR
Region: 05 , Donets'ka Oblast'
City: Donetsk
Postal code:
Latitude: 48 , Longitude: 37.8
Metro code: Area code:


Shargorod   (Szargorod (Polish), Sharigrad (Russian), Sharigrod (Ukraine) and Sargorog (Hebrew.)

Shargorod is located in Vinnitskaya at 48ş45 28ş5, 56 km from Vinnitsa. Present town population is 5,001-25,000 with 101-1,000 Jews. Shargorod is one of the few remaining shtetls

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0018_0_
18225.html

https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%A9%D7%A8%D7%94%D7%95%D7%A8%D7%95%D7%93 

http://ukrainianheritagefound.com/bar.html

http://www.jta.org/2007/09/17/news-opinion/world/jewish-pearls-remain-in-south-ukraine

http://www.eej.dotwebsystem.com/content/_common/attachments/pages_
from_jewish_space_in_central_and_eastern_europe_261-338.pdf

Cemetery
The cemetery is located at Muravskoe highway after the bridge on the outskirts of the town  "The tombstones are everywhere. Old ones jut out of the high grass at awkward angles. The graves overlook the green rolling hills-Ukraine's blood-soaked black earth under the perfect dome of its vast blue skies. The 1917 Bolshevik Revolution and the Russian Civil War, the Second World War and Soviet rule gave the shtetls a mortal blow. Today, it seems only the names on the graves remain-Bratslav, Uman, Nemirov, Bershad, Shepetovka. Maria Yakovlevna, a Ukrainian woman who has been tending Shargorod's Jewish cemetery for most of her life, walks among the tombstones in early August. One stone is possibly readable with a very well-trained eye and a magnifying glass, but perhaps not."
http://articles.latimes.com/1997/nov/09/news/mn-51918

http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/shargorod.html

Synagogue
http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Space:Shargorod


Sharovka

There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives
http://www.tripmondo.com/ukraine/khmel-nyts-ka-oblast/sharovka/

http://books.google.com/books?id=iitQhYsM-dMC&pg=PA1367&lpg=PA1367&dq=Sharovka+Jew&source=bl&ots=mMxVOL
gDQA&sig=TTUt3_OsWxZqOZ4N4oo0TQIJZb8&hl=en#v=onepage&q=Sharovka%20Jew&f=false


Shatova (Shatov)

A small village in the Kamenets-Podolski region. Shatov in Kurskaya Oblast' is located in Russia - roughly 301 mi (or 484 km) South of Moscow, the seat of the Russian government
http://www.tripmondo.com/russia/kurskaya-oblast/shatov/


Shepetovka (Shepetivka)

Research
There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives


Sherivtsi   (Szerewci)

Located about 32 km northeast of Chernivtsi Horishni Sherivtsi is about 11 km north of Chernivtsi


 Maps

http://www.infoukes.com/ua-maps/oblasts/oblast06/Pages/Pg7.html 


Shostka


Shumsk

Located at 50'07'/26'07', 62 km south of Rovno. It is now part of the Ternopil District , but is identified with the historic region of Volhynia. It was part of Poland from the 16th century to the end of the 18th century, when it became part of Russia.

In 1921 the Treaty of Riga returned Shumsk to Poland. It became part of the USSR in 1939, but was overtaken by the German Army during World War II. In 1945 Shumsk was again part of the USSR, and remained so until the establishment of the independent state of Ukraine in 1991.
http://www.sonic.net/~shumsker/shumsk/shumsk.html


Shyshkovtse

There are two towns with this name; one was in the district of Zaleszczyki, sub district Tluste and is 50 km north of Chernivtsi. 

The other Shyshkovtse was in the Brody district, sub district Polka Mien.


Simferopol


Sitniaki

Close to Fastov  and Kiev


Skala (G) - (Skala-Podolskaya )

Once a part of Galicia and is located in Borshchiv Guberniya, Ternopol Oblast and about 60 miles southeast of Ternopol, bordering Halychyna (Galicia).   It lies east of Gorodenka, just west of Kamenets Podolski. The population is approximately 5,000. 

To the north there is the town of Smotrich and Orinin is due south.  According to the Times Atlas of the World (Page 82) it is located in a direct line between Chortkov in the northwest and Kamenets Podolski in the southeast.  This whole area is east of L'vov in an area surrounded by Ivano-Frankovsk in the west, Ternopol in the north- Khmelnytsky in the east and Chenovtsy in the south.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_skala.htm    

Skala Podilska
Regional Special Interest Groups

Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Skalat (G)

Formerly in Galicia (Austro-Hungary), then Poland, and now in Ukraine
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_skalat.htm

It was home to a large Jewish population, and even more families lived in the surrounding villages and towns, according to an article in her City Lights column by Schelly Talalay Dardashti in The Jerusalem Post. Schelly Dardashti Email address: schelly@allrelative.net  
http://www.jpost.com/Editions/2002/01/03/JewishWorld/JewishWorld.41063.html 

Cemetery
The Skalaters Association in Israel planed to visit and dedicate a memorial consisting of Jewish gravestones that had been used as building material, in July 2002.  This memorial was constructed in a corner of the former cemetery now being used by a nearby school as a soccer field.  At the edge of the soccer field, there is some fifteen grave stones, neatly stacked.  There is also a Holocaust memorial outside the town.  This memorial includes about twenty gravestones that had been taken from the cemetery, standing around the central memorial.  So that the stones would all be of the same height, some were cut at the bottoms, where the names appeared.  Further information can be obtained from Haim Braunstein 03 618 3213 or
40 Hibat Zion, Ramat Gan 52408, Israel. 

History
Includes information from the 1971 Skalat Yizkor book, and a list of members researching families from Skalat 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Skalat/skalat.html
 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Synagogue
There is a 'synagogue' which had been turned into a warehouse and is deserted now.

Travel
A visit the Skalat Holocaust Memorial in the Holon Cemetery, which can be viewed from the Skalat site at SRRG.  The page for the memorial is labeled "New".  You'll also find a 'Trip Report' including photos.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Skalat/Skalat.html
 

Yizkor Book
"Skalat; Kovets Zikaron Le-Kehila she-Harva ba-Shoa"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Skvira

Skvira, Ukraine
http://home.earthlink.net/~chervinfamily/Ref/Maps/Frm/skvi-f01.html

Skvira was an ancient town which was completely destroyed at the end of the 16th century.  In 1897 there were 8,910 Jews - about half the population.  Almost 1,000 Jews who didn't escape the Nazis, were murdered by them in September, 1941 
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0018_0_18697.html

Cemetery
"The old cemetery has been destroyed. The between wars cemetery is in the back and pretty overgrown. The post WW2 cemetery is in the front, has 100-200 stones and is maintained. There are also 3 mass murder sites there marked by memorials. One of the memorials lists the family names of the people who were killed there."
http://www.mrt5.com/ukraine.html


Skovyatin - (Polish: Skowiatyn)

Borszczow district in Tarnopol region was part of Austro-Hungarian Empire. The town is located close to the old Russia (Podolia region) - Austria border, but nevertheless it was in Austria, not Russia.


Skovyatino

Located at 5848 3723, near Cherepovets


Skubyatino

Located at 5519 3104 near Belarusian border is situated only 15 miles from the known Jewish town Surazh (Surazh-Vitebskiy, Surz) in the Vitebsk region


Slavuta

Located in the Khmel'nyts'ka Oblast, Slavutskii District.
http://www.huri.harvard.edu/abb_grimsted/L-1.html

http://www.lemko.org/genealogy/oblasts.html

Research
There are records available in the Ukrainian Archives. 


Slovechno

http://jewage.org/wiki/en/Special:JImages/Slovechno_Ukraine

In May, 1919, in this town, located in the Volyn province, there was a terrible massacre
http://www.oldgazette.ru/lib/pogrom/03.html#6


Slovyansk


Smla

A certificate, obtained by Ruth Rosenbloom, indicates: 'That in the Registry Books of the Birth of Jewish people in the town of Smla, Kiev County, in 1885, in the Female Column #88, is an extract that to Zoose Abramovitch Belatsakofske, a reserve discharged from the Russian army, and his wife Mariam Ruhel, was born on June 28, 1885, in Smla, a daughter, to whom was given the name Muse.  Town of Smla, 1910, June 8, Smolensk Community of Rabbis.'  This translation was done by 'The Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society' May 1956


Smila  (Smela (

Cemetery

DSC09929
There is an "old" and a Municipal Jewish cemetery as well as a Mass Grave site
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=60&p17
_imageid=857


Sniatyn (G) (Snyatyn)

Formerly in Galicia and now located in Ukraine

Holocaust
Most of the Jews were sent to Belzec Camp by the Nazis in April, 1942 and July 9, 1942. 

Landsmanshaft
The Sniatyn Landsmanshaft has been in continuous existence for more than 100 years and offers a site that includes an historical overview of the town, region maps, old postcards of the town, a long, descriptive and highly interesting interview with a woman who was born in Sniatyn in the first decade of this century, an overview of the Sniatyn Landsmanshaft and its current genealogical activities plus a comprehensive list of the current genealogical holdings. Click on cancel if a password dialog box pops up.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Sniatyn/
  

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
The churches and synagogues wee responsible to recording vital statistics (births and deaths) for the state.  The Sniatyn historical books could be in several places: in the Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine, L'viv; in the local registry office (ZAHS) in Oblast Archives (Sniatyn is in Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast); or in the Polish National Archives (Archives of Ancient Documents in Warszawa).  The ZAHS has more recent documents.


Snitkov (Snitovka)


Books  
             

This town is mentioned in
"
The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock  
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Snizhne  


Sobolevka

There are 6 different towns named Sobolevka.


Sokal

While there are many towns that have the name Sokol, in west Ukraine, there is only one place that has the spelling of Sokal


 Maps

   
 http://www.mapquest.com/ 

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Sokolovka (Justingrad)

Current name is Justingrad and it is located North of Uman on the main road #M20 on the way from Belaya Tserkov and Kiev

P1010157
Jewish Cemetery and there is also a Mass Grave site
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=63&p17
_imageid=951


Solotvyn

The remains of a Jewish cemetery dating to the 16th century in the Ukrainian village of Solotyvn.  (Dina Kraft)

The remains of a Jewish cemetery dating to the 16th century in the Ukrainian village of Solotvyn  (Photo: Dina Kraft)
http://cja.huji.ac.il/Activities/Updates.html


Soroki (Soroka)

Located on the Moldova border, near the Dniester River.


Sosnovoye (Selisht, Seish Scihin (Yiddish), Sagol Slistht (German), Lyudvilpol (Hungarian) and Lyudvopol (Czech)


Main Street and square in Sosnove
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sosnove

Sosnovoye is located in Rovenskaya, 62 km from Rovno. Present town population is 1,000-5,000 with no Jews. The earliest known Jewish Community was 17-18th century. 1937 Jewish population (census) was 1100

http://www.holocaustcenter.org/page.aspx?pid=567

http://www.jewishgen.org/cgi-bin/volhynia/voltowns.pl

Cemetery
The mass grave is located at Shevchenka St. 32. No other towns or village's Jews were murdered at this mass grave. The isolated flat land has no sign or marker. Reached by turning directly off a public road, access is open to all. No wall, fence, or gate surrounds the mass grave. No stones are visible or removed. The mass grave contains unmarked mass graves. Private individual/s owns site used for agriculture (crops or animal grazing) Properties adjacent are residential and shops. The mass grave boundaries is larger now than 1939. Visited rarely by organized Jewish group tours or pilgrimage groups and local residents. The mass grave was not vandalized in the last ten years. There is no maintenance
http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/ukraine/sosnovoye.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG Contact Larry Lavittt
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Stakhanov


Staneshti de Zhos

Yizkor Book
The following link to this shtetl 's site has been expanded with the addition of a Memorial List and a List of Survivors "Die Juden in Unter-Stanestie" (The Jews of Unter-Stanestic) and "Unter Stanestie Bukowinaer Circle, Inc." printed in a 20th anniversary booklet and banquet journal.  Just follow this site: 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/
  

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Stanislawow  (Stanislav)

Located east of Warsaw. There are several hundred Jews living in this community and the Rabbi name is Moshe Leib Kolesnik, a local man, trained by Chabad in Moscow.  He also helps the smaller Jewish communities of Kolomyia and Buczacz. 


Books  
             

"Chapter Two of The Jews of Stanislawow Province"
Authored by Rabbi Moishe Leib Kolesnik in PDF format includes selected items (by Town) from the Rabbi's Archive


Stara Ropa

Located in the Stary Sambir rayian (district) in the L'viv oblast in Western Ukraine


Books  
                          

    
 It is listed under the neighboring parish of Starya Sol (Russian spelling) in the book about the L'viv Oblast  "Istoria Horodovy i Sel Ukraininskoi SSR - Lvovskaya Oblast".  There are 26 volumes, see Volume 6.   There  are also volumes of a Soviet Encyclopedia in English.


Stara Syniava  (Stara Sieniawa)

The Jewish population, or Kehila, in this, the Czartoryski Territories in 1776, obtained from Appendix I of the book amounted to 851.


Books  
             

"The Lords' Jews, Magnate-Jewish Relations in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth during the 18th Century"
Authored by M. J. Rosman


Staro Konstantinov (Old Constantine aka Novokonstantin) [New Constantine])

A city in Volynska Oblast and is about 80 miles from Zhitomir. It was an important Jewish center, it produced a number of scholars, and it was an important center of Chasidism.


 Books  
             

This town is mentioned in
"
The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock 
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Research
A description of what a flour mill operation run by Jews was like in Russia in the early 1900s was discussed by JWeintraub@FULLERTON.EDU
on JewishGen 11-19-02

Yizkor Book
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2008-03/
msg00010.html


Stary Sambor  (Staryy Sambir, Staryi Sambir, Samor)

The Polish and Austrian official place name (Staryy Sambir, Staryi Sambir, Samor) . 


 Maps

    http://www.mapquest.com/
  

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
- Contact Laurel White. 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Staro Zakrevsky


Books  
             

This town is mentioned in
"
The Road from Letichev"
Authored by David A. Chapin and Ben Weinstock 
http://home.earthlink.net/~dchapin/
 


Stavishche (Stavisht)

Yizkor Book
"Stavisht" Yizkor Book
"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Steblev

DSC08632
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=66


Stepan ( Stefan, Szczepan, Stepantsy)  

Located along the Horyn River. The remains of a fortification gate can be found under the Shul, along with a tunnel that connected two fortresses. 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/stepan/stepan.html

Cemetery
Stepantsy Jewish Cemetery
Stepantsy Jewish Cemetery
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=23

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG - Contact Daniel G. Shimshak. 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"Ayaratenu Stepan"
(Our City Stepan)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

A translation of some of the stories that occurred in this shtetl from 1939 on 
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stepan/stepan.html
 


Storojinet (Stordjinet)

There is an excellent site for further information about this old Jewish village located near the Carpathian mountains.  It was once part of Romania (Bukovina). The site offers old pictures of the Rigler family and pictures of what the town looks like now 

ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/storojinet/
 

Yizkor Book

Haim Cohen's Storojinet Memorial Page
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/storojinet/


Strels'k   (Polish: Strzeliska Nowe, now known as Novyye Strelishcha, Ukraine, Strel'sk, Stril's'k)

Located 50 km SE of L'viv in what used to be known as Bobrka county. There is also a small town called Strel'sk northeast of L'vov and close to the Belarus border and still another one (Strelsk) located near Kiev and in the Volhyn Province.  It is a few kilometers north of Sarny, Ukraine, and about 75 km north of Rivne, Ukraine.

Holocaust
"List of Holocaust Victims from Strels'k"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/strzelsk/strzelsk.html


Strusov (G)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Stryhantsi

First mentioned in 1578. The name come from Ukrainian word "stryhty" - to cut (usually hair, to make a haircut or to cut something with scissors) Village shop in Stryhantsi, tel.: +380 3548 31183 Village club in Stryhantsi, Tel.: +380 3548 31187
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/zemla.htm


Stryy (G) (Stryj-Polish; Stryi, Stryia and Stry)

Located in Western Ukraine (formerly Eastern Galicia) about 40 miles south of L'viv. A Jewish community has been in existence since the late 1500s. In 1772 the town became part of the Austrian Empire.  At that time there were abut 440 Jewish families.  It became a part of Poland after WW I.  In 1921 there were 10,988 and about 12,000 in 1939. For information, maps and book resources
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/stryy/

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Stryj" (Book of Stryj); 
"
Extermination of the Jews of Stryj and Vicinity" (Emergence of Genocide in Galicia and Resettlement Transports to Belzec Extermination Camp); "The Town of Stryj Without Jews" (Memoir of Schaje Schmerier);  "Schupo-Kriegsverbrecher von Stryj vor dem Wiener Volksgericht" (The Protective Police War Criminals of Stryj Tried By the People's Court  
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html
 


Suchostav (G)

A shtetl and a region that is 226 miles west southwest of Kiev and was a part of Galicia.  Within a 25 mile radius are Buchach, Khorostkov, Chortkov and Husiaty.  To the northwest, is the Poland border and to the south is the Romania border. There is much to learn from this site 

Cemetery
Four hundred photos of gravestones
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Buchach/Gravestones2000/index.htm

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Rozhnyatov/Gravestones2000/index.htm 

Thomas Weiss tfweiss@mit.edu is the webmaster for the Rozniatow and Suchostav Web pages
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/SRRGhome.html 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
Shaya (Sidney) Fink, and his brothers (Leo, Jake, A. I., Willie) were among the very first, if not the first, such [windows washing and maintenance] company in New York. They gave jobs to all the "boys" from Suchostaw right off the boat. Indeed, numerous naturalization certificates show witnesses who were either a Fink brother, or other Suchostawers who worked for them."

Why did they choose this business? In the beginning it was cheap, you needed a bucket, a brush, rags, and you built up your business. Philosophy behind this, as my grandfather used to say: no matter how bad times got, e.g. the Depression, if your place of business wasn't clean, no customers would come in. Even if your business was nearly bankrupt, the windows, floors etc had to be clean, to show a good face.

Cousins and other relatives started branches in Chicago and assisted others in getting started, like in Florida. Many Suchostawers were members of the Suchostawers Benevolent Society. A video also includes several years of annual memorial services at the cemetery plot in NY, on whose pillars are engraved the names of the officers and founders of the group, including the Finks.  From a posting by Shelly Talalay Dardashti

ShtetLinks

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/SRRGhome.html

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_suchostaw.htm

Yizkor Book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Rozniatow/Rozhnyatov.html


Strzalkowce (now Stshalkoytse)

Located about four miles from Borshchev.


Suceava County

Located in the southern half of the area formerly known as Bukovina.  The northern portion of Bukovina s now part of the Ukraine.  This site includes maps 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/suceava.htm
 


Suchostaw Region Research Group

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostaw/SRRGhome.html

The SRRG includes the following Administrative Districts (AD) and Judicial Districts (JD): Buczacz AD - Czortkow AD - Husiatyn AD -Skalat AD - Trembowla AD - Zaleszczyki AD \Tarnopol AD - Borszczow JD - Skala JD - Zbaraz JD

Some of Shtetlach:
Barysz, Baworów, Beremyany, Bilcze, Borszczów, Borki Wielkie, Buczacz, Budzanow, Burakowka, Chorostkow, Cygany, Czortkow, Darachow, Dolina, Grzymalow, Hadynkowce, Horodnica, Husiatyn, Jablonów, Jagielnica, Janow, Jazlowiec, Kaczanowka, Kluvince, Kobylowloki, Kolodziejowka, Kopyczynce, Kosmezhin, Kotowka,  Korolowka, Kosmierzyn, Kosow, Krzyvoluka, Kujdance, Ladyczin, Lanowce, Losyacz, Mikulince, Molczanowka, Monasterzyska, Myshkowce, Myszkowice, Nagorzanka, Ostapie, Ostra, Ozeryany, Pauszowka, Podwoloczyska, Potok Zloty, Probuzhna, Romanowka, Romanowe Siolo, Skala, Skalat, Snowidow, Sosolowka, Strusow, Stryjowka, Suchostaw, Suszczyn,Swidowa, Swierzkowce, Tarnopol, Tarnoruda, Teklowka, Trembowla, Tluste, Touste, Trybuchowce, Tudorow, Ulaszkowce, Wasylkowce, Wygnanka, Worwolince, Zaleszczyki, Zazdrosc, Zbar


Sudak


Sudilkov

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~pauldana/

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Research
Paul W. Ginsburg, Webmaster of the excellent  Sudilkov On-line Landsmanshaft site
http://www.sudilkov.com


Sukhivtsi

Located 5 km north of Terpylivka 


Sumy

Located in central north part of country. A number of Sumy web sites (some in English)

Photos
See also a photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry'
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html


Surazh

Located near Bryansk and was in different Guberniyas at various times. 

Records
Records may be held in the Bryansk Archive


Sushchin (Sushchyn, Suszczyn)

Located SSE from Ternopil


Sverdlovsk


Svezhkovtse

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Svidova

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Svitlovodsk


Szimerki

Located in Zakarpatia Oblast.

Research
For record searching, you need to contact the Uzhhorod Archives in and the respective registries.


Szumsk (Shumsk)

According to the "Yevreyskaya (Jewish) Encicklopaedia", published in St. Petersburg, the population of Shumsk in 1907-1913 was 2,258.  87% of the population was Jewish.

Yizkor Book
"Sefer Zikaron le-Kedoshei Szumsk"
(Szumsk ... Memorial Book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Talnoye  (Tolna, Tulna, Talno, Tolnoye)     Talnoye

  
   Roadside sign indicating Talnoye - photo taken by Ted Margulis

The Yiddish name is Tolna -107.3 miles South and West of Kiev and today is in the Cherkassy Region. It is 38 km northeast of Uman.

Talnoye  for photos and a brief story about the town - located in Kiev oblast.  In 1847 there were 1,807 Jews and by 1897 their number reached 5,452 (57% of the total population).  Before WW II, there were 4,169 Jews. Most of the records (1884-1848) for Uman and possibly Talnoye, (it has been reported), are in the State Archives of Cherkassy Oblast.

Tal'ne in Ukrainian, or Tal'noye in Russian, is in the former Kiev Guberniya between Uman and Zvenigorodka. This URL should produce a map showing both Ostropol' and Tal'noye, so you can see that Tal'noye was perhaps a few hundred miles from Ostropol'.
http://tinyurl.com/6muhzh


During the 19th century, Rabbi David Twersky lived in Talnoye.  Thousands of Chasidim in Ukraine adhered to Twersky and subsequently to his sons.  The melodies of the Chazzan of the Chasidic Court, Rabbi Yossele Tolner, became popular among the masses in Russia and Poland. 

The Twersky Rabbinical line comes from Talnoye
Rabbi Y. Twersky, Talner Congregation
64 Corey Road, Brookline, Mass. 02146 and

Harvard University Center for Jewish Studies
6 Divinity Avenue
Cambridge, Mass 02138. 

An Ohel close to the center of town holds the remains of Reb David Twersky.  The un-land-marked Jewish community was Orthodox. 

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze2nb56/talner/about/talneHistory.html

In the 1938 census there were 12,000 Jews and today the town population is around 60,000
with one or two Jews left.  It was said that all one needed to do to take a census of the town's residents, was to count the number of violins hanging on the wall of each house.  My father was one of those who played the violin and continued to play for many years.  When I introduced my soon-to-be wife, Shirley, to my family, my father excused himself and in a few minutes, returned with his violin, so that he could express his feelings of meeting Shirley for the first time.

A survey of the town, by Irene Silfin in 1997, is located at
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/e-europe/ukra-t.html
 

The Mayor's office is at
v1 Lenine 28,
2nd floor, 258730
Talnoye, UK

The city suffered severely from bands of peasants who ravaged the region in 1919-20.  The soldiers of the White Army who passed through Talnoye during the summer of 1919 rioted and burnt down a large part of the city.  In 1926 there were 4,169 Jews (39% of the population). 

The Jewish settlement was destroyed after the region was taken by the Nazis in 1941.  The Jews were led out of the town believing they were going to board a ship to take them to Palestine.  There is a memorial at the place where they were all machine gunned down and dumped into a mass grave, just outside of town. 

Talnoye
Personally visited by Ted & Shirley Margulis in August, 1994.  The Mayor, at the time, said that they were the first American Jews to ever had visited the town. There are just a few older Jews still living in this farm area although there are several younger people who do not claim to be Jewish, but most likely are.  During the 1930s, an archeological dig discovered a very early settlement just outside of the shtetl and there is the "Castle" now used as a Town Museum that hold many artifacts from the past years. 

The cemetery is located on the outskirts of the city, about 38 km northeast of Uman, and is in the Kiev Oblast.    The site is reached by turning directly off a public road.  Access is open to all with no wall, fence or gate surrounding the area.  The cemetery is many hectares.  Five gravestones are in their original location, but many are in the new section.  Most are buried beneath earth and grass. Vegetation is a problem in the newer parts of the cemetery.  The granite finely smoothed and inscribed stones or double tombstones, some with portraits on the stones, are inscribed in Yiddish and Russian/UkrainianIrene Silfin visited the town in July, 1995.
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/e-europe/ukra-t.html

 

A typical 19th century kitchen as depicted in the Museum in Talnoye
Photo taken by Ted Margulis in August, 1994

The lone synagogue in Talnoye is in major disrepair and the original Jewish cemetery has been paved over as a playground for a public school today.  The original tombstones have been used as paving materials although some can still be seen lying on the hillside that leads to the nearby river.

Just outside of the shtetl is a mass grave, marked by two small stone pyramids The plaques attached indicates that 5,871 Jews were murdered by the Fascists in August, 1941.  What happened was that the German Einsatzgruppen Group C herded the Jews of the town, and surrounding areas, after telling them they would be walking to Odessa to board a ship to Palestine.  As they approached this site, German machine gunners mowed them down.

Today, Talnoye is in the Cherkassy Region Kiev Guberniya was broken up into several different Regions when the Soviets took over."

There is a Talnoye Group which has it's own web site and mailing list
http://www.talnoye.com/index.html


Books  
             

"Memoirs of Mischa Elman's Father"
Out of print but written in 1933 and may be available from a public library.  Mischa left Talnoye as a young boy and after his conservatory studies, went to London and then to the U.S.


The Margulis Saga

I hope an inspiring story of how I was able to successfully locate my half brother's son who was born in Talnoye, moved to Kerch in the Crimea and later moved to Siberia during WW II, and who now lives in Melbourne, Australia with his wife Lana and their son.  My half brothers and my father were born and raised in Talnoye

Margulis Saga to read the story of how we found each other after using the web and the International Red Cross to do the search.


"So where there was that forest there was a road so they were brought here.  There was not a field here, there were the ravines here.  On the 16th of August they were unloaded from these wagons here.  The Germans stood with their machine guns on the small hill here and the others were standing on the other hill so they were shooting people from two sides.  It was early in the morning and until late in the evening.  That's why I didn't believe when people say that there were two thousand people here because of course more were killed here.  The people from this neighboring village of Belashe tell that the earth was moving here nearly for five days and even some children were saved. People who lived in the next village, Belashive, they came at night here and tried to save some children who were still alive.  And two women who live now in Vladisvastock, they came here and they were two of these children who were saved and they were just taken off this ravine and when we looked we saw that there were bodies were from this monument to that one.  There is another monument there to mark this collective tomb.  And we even wanted to take this strip of land and to make a memorial complex but until this time we have not been allowed to do this."

"So this is the tragedy which happened here. [Reading from memorial] The Eternal memory of victims of fascism 16th August 1941.  And if you look in that direction you can just see there is on the horizon the village of Belashe and behind that village there was a field on which Hitler and Mussolini were on this military parade just on the same day when people were being shot here. They were Italian military detachment here and they took the victory parade on that field behind the village there.  I want to make people know that a definite number of those were shot here because until this time the truth is not open for everybody.  When I wrote to the court, because I had an opportunity to address him through the German embassy, the German Side recognized that the real amount of those who were killed here was 6,000. And you know that they are not so easy to agree and but if they recognize that figure in response to be truth.

This road was built in the 50's.  It was laid down and it was even an attempt to lay this road just on the places of these the memorials.  So there were even efforts made by the people who lived here at this time to stop them [from building the road over the memorial]. And this is the second memorial.  The second place.  So they were shooting from that place to this place." 

The above was typed in exactly as my friend Mila Begun (of blessed memory) had sent it to me before her untimely death.  Unfortunately I do not know who the person was that wrote the above, but having been the first American Jew to visit the site, I can attest to the facts as they were explained to my wife and I by the former Mayor Polisheck. 

Ted and Shirley Margulis


Tarasha (Tarasche)

Located about 1.5 hour drive southwest of Kiev. 

Cemetery
There is remnants of a Jewish cemetery with the oldest stone dated 1892, though the majority of those stones prior to WW II were bulldozed or overgrown with vines.  Jacqueline Garrick visited the cemetery in 2003: 301 942 8817
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/e-europe/ukra-t.html

History
In 1891, 12 year old Boris Thomasefsky arrived in New York City from this shtetl.  He had a beautiful voice and on Saturdays, young Boris earned money by singing at the Henry Street Synagogue on the Lower East Side.  During the week he worked as a cigarette maker in a sweatshop where he heard his fellow workers sings songs from the Yiddish theater they had attended in the "old country".  At age 13 he became producer and director of a traveling company presenting a wide repertoire of Yiddish plays.  He and his wife Bessie became the most famous Yiddish theater impresarios.


Tarashcha  (Tarasca in Yiddish; Tarashtcha in German and Trarsza in Polish)

Located 122 km from Kiev and has a town population of somewhere between 5,000 and 25,000 with between 11 to 100 Jews.  Town Officials addresses are at
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/e-europe/ukra-t.html

Holocaust
Jews from here were buried in a mass grave at Medvin during the Holocaust.


Tarnorudka (G)  (Tarnoruda in Polish)

Located in the Tarnopol province.  In 1921, it had 571 people with 148 of them being Jewish.  It is located south east from Tarnopol Podvolochisk (Polish: Podwololyczyska) and is on the border of the Zbruch River between Satanov and Podvolochisk and 10 miles south of Podvolochisk.  It is a historical border town dividing Poland from Soviet Union in the interwar period. During this same period, the town was under the town of Skalat administration.  Further information can be found in the Archives of the Gesher Galicia SIG. 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_tarnoruda.htm 

Alexander Sharon wrote up this subject town
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG  
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Teleshovka  

Located near Kiev.

Cemetery

The Jewish Cemetery in this shtetl is in poor condition and contains many mass graves.


Terebovlia (Terebovlya) (G) - (see Trembowla)

It was once a part of Galicia


 Maps


     You can find a map of Trembowla (Terebovlia) district or province at the US Library of Congress
     Map and Geography Division
     http://www.loc.gov/rr/geogmap/

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
  

ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_trembowla.htm
 

Yizkor Book

translations.html


Terlitsya

Cemetery

http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid
=30&p17_imageid=247

 


Ternopil  (Tarnopol, Tarnopol. Ternopol, Tarnopolu )

From 1772 to 1919, it was in Austria's Galizien Crownland (Galicia) During this time it's name
was spelled Tarnopol.  Prior to that it was in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.  From the end of WW I to 1939 it was in Poland and was spelled TarnopolThen it was in the Soviet Ukraine and now Ukraine.  During the Soviet era it was spelled Ternopol, now it is spelled Ternopil. (see Tarnopol, Ternopol, Tarnopol, Tarnopolu) There are/were about 400 Jews living in the area in 2005. David Feinstein is considered the head of the Jewish Community of Ternopil Oblast.

Part of the L'viv and Ternopil Oblast were also part of the Volynska Guberniya.  The administrative boundaries changed at the whim of the conquerors.  To get a definition of "Volynska Zemlia", one should go back to the 9-14th centuries AD, when Volyn was an "udilove kniazivstvo", or even a totally independent Volyn' Princedom.  Later, Volyn' joined with Halychyna into the Halytcko-Volynske Korolivstvo (kingdom), which eventually joined with Lithuania, and later was swallowed up by Poland.

Archives
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~orjgs/win22.PDF

Ternopol Oblast Archives
State Archives of Ternopol Oblast, Ukraine,
Derzhavnyi Arkhiv Ternopilskoi Oblasti
,
282000, Ternopol,
vul. Sahaidachnoho 14, Ukraina. 
Director is Bogdan Khavarivsky. 
Phone (0352) 224495  Fax: (0352) 228618
http://www.archives.gov.ua/Eng/Archives/ra19.php

The Director has stated that you can send an inquiry in English to his archive, but to always include an IRC (International Reply Coupon) because, even if the archives doesn't find any information, they will still send you a letter in any case.

The Archives has census documents (Revizskaya Skazka) to before 1735 according to Ron Doctor's Ukraine Journal
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~orjgs/trips/Ron/ron_main.htm


History

Photos, history and a monument at
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/galicia.htm


 Maps

Carl R. Migden crmigden@aol.com has a present day map/plan of Ternopil though it is in the Ukrainian language.

Ternopil City Maps Page
http://www.lemko.org/maps/cities/index.html

Many churches are beautifully photographed, Descriptions are in Cyrillic,
http://www.ssft.ternopil.ua/oldtern/
   

Photos
Photo gallery entitled 'The Vanishing World of Ukrainian Jewry
http://pages.prodigy.net/euroscope/jewishworld.html

Research
Birth records from 1866 to 1897 and marriage records from 1878 to 1897
http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/ 

Book of Lists of Soldiers
who disappeared and/or were killed in Action in WWII for Ternopil Oblast.  The books, (50 volumes)  are published only in Ukrainian. The book is entitled "Knyha Pam'iati Ukrainy" (Memorial Book of Ukraine) and are published separately in several volumes in each capital city for each Oblast in Ukraine (between about 1990 and 1998).  The material in each volume is arranged by: Raion (an average of 5 per volume) Village/town Soviet (about 300 of them per volume) Family Names (about 14,000 per book)

There is no index.  The Library of congress has some volumes listed.
http://www.litopysupa.com/main.php?pg=2&bookid=286

Synagogue
http://members.core.com/~mikerose/polsynagog.htm


Ternovka (Tarnovka)

The town is at the edge of the Podolia District, bordering on the Kiev District. 132.8 miles South of Kiev


Tetiev - (Tetijev—Tetiyev—Tetievo—Tetiewo—Tetiyiv—Tetiew—Tatiew -Tetiw—Tetyiow (Polish) Titeyow—
                 Titejov— TeTiďb/TETIĎB (Cyrillic

Located 70 miles south sw of Kiev and near Belaya Tserkov, a larger town. In the Kiev Guberniya.  

Pogrom
This town is most noted as the scene of a massacre in 1920 that left about 5,000 dead.  a new site contains extensive information about this time including the history of Tetiever emigrant organizations, death and survivor lists, photographs 
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/tetiev/tetiev.htm
 


Tilsit (Sovetsk)

Located in the Tulskaya Oblast 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jewsineastprussia/3168676156/


Tlumach (G)  (Tlumacz (Polish); Tlomats (Yiddish)  

Once a part of Galicia.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/tlumach/tlumach.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Tlumacz

Yizkor Book
"Tlumacz - Tlomitsch Sefer Edut ve - Zikaron" (Memorial Book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Tolstoye (G) (Tlusta (Yiddish), Tluste (German), Tluste Miasto (Hungarian), Tluste Wies  (Slovak), Touste
                            (Polish), Tovste (Czech), Toyste (English
)

Once a part of Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/Tolstoye4850/Tolstoye4850.html

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Tomashpol


Books  
             

"The Shtetl: Image and Reality"
Edited by Gennady Estraikh and Mikhail Krutikov and published by The University of Oxford in 2000, Alla Sokolova's study is entitled "The Podolian Shtetl as Architectural Phenomenon."  The author describes the general layout of the town and discusses the architecture and interiors of many of the buildings she visited.


Torez


Transnistria

Yizkor Book
"Reminiscences of Transnistria"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Trembowla (G)   (Terebovlia)

Now in Ukraine but was once located in Poland and specifically in Galicia.

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Tributkhovtsy

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Trochinbrod  (Zofiowka)

http://members.tripod.com/sokolowg/troch.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG

http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Trostyanets (G)  (Troscianiec)

This site mentions a pogrom by Russian troops which occurred in 1915. The website also offers panoramic views of Trostyanets seen from the Sus mountain. Although the website was not created by a Jew, there is some information about the Jews of the town: in 1892 twenty one Jews lived there and in 1900 there were nineteen Jews. Only five Jews remained in 1939. The website's author remarks that the Jews of Trostyanets kept the Sabbath strictly, and used a Ukrainian neighbor ["Sabbath Goy'] to light the fire
http://www.personal.ceu.hu/students/97/Roman_Zakharii/trostyanets.htm 

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG 
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Truskavets


Tsybulev


Jewish Cemetery and there is a Mass Grave Memorial
http://www.lo-tishkach.org/en/index.php?categoryid=51&p17_sectionid=32&p17
_imageid=257


Tuchin   (Tuczyn, Tutshin, Tuchin - Krippe)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

ShtetLinks
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/tuchin/tuchin.htm


Tudorov (G)

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Tulchin

Located south of Breslov in Vinnitsa province 

"I have been getting mail from people who are searching for people from Tulchin in Vinnitsa province. If you are interested I will be most willing to share with you. I am looking for FEINSTEIN, MALAMUD, YABLIK, SCHMULENSON, MARSHAFSKY, BECKER  and WEISSMAN  any help will be appreciated. Esther Feinstein Sackheim ZeraKodesh@aol.com

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=808&letter=C#2748

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1056838

http://tinyurl.com/5oh7se


Turja Remeta

Records
For record searching, you need to contact the Uzhhorod Archives  and the respective registries.


Tysmenitza  (G)  (Tysmenitsa, Tismenitsie, Tysmienica

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG - Contact Susannah R. Juni
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 

Yizkor Book
"A
Memorial to the ruins of a Destroyed Jewish Community"
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Ulashkovtse (G) (Ulashkivitsi)

Once part of Galicia
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostav/SuchostavRegion/sl_ulaszkowce.htm

Regional Special Interest Groups
Ukraine SIG, Galicia SIG and Hungary SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/Shtetlinks/ukraine.html
 


Uman  (Koliivshchyna)


     A wide angle view, found in a brochure, of the main street of Uman

Located 115.9 miles South of Kiev - half way between Kiev and Odessa, it is also the bu